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4389 full-text articles. Page 4 of 101.

Can Jailbreaking Put You In Jail, Broke?, Trace H. Jackson 2017 University of Florida Levin College of Law

Can Jailbreaking Put You In Jail, Broke?, Trace H. Jackson

Florida Law Review

Most Americans own at least one “smart device.” These include smartphones and video game consoles. Device manufacturers limit an owner’s use of his smart device through both licensing agreements and technological measures. While the public largely ignores licensing agreements, the technological measures actively prevent an owner from using his device in whatever manner he sees fit, despite the fact that he owns the device. This prevention has led people to develop methods to circumvent these technological measures. These methods are device- dependent and include “jailbreaking” (iPhones), “modding” (video game consoles), and “rooting” (Androids).

This Note explores whether jailbreak developers ...


Antitrust And Information Technologies, Herbert Hovenkamp 2017 University of Florida Levin College of Law

Antitrust And Information Technologies, Herbert Hovenkamp

Florida Law Review

The relationship between antitrust policy and information was traditionally concerned with oral or written communications that had anticompetitive potential, mainly because they furthered collusion or market exclusion. Among the most difficult problems was interpreting the significance of communications that could be construed as either threats or offers to collude, or as facilitators of collusion. On the one hand, markets profit greatly from the free flow of information. On the other, particular uses of information threaten competition when they enable firms to coordinate price, output, or innovation.

Of course, explicit price fixing is a use of information but so are various ...


Manhattan_Project.Exe: A Nuclear Option For The Digital Age, David Laton 2017 Laton & Strain LLC

Manhattan_Project.Exe: A Nuclear Option For The Digital Age, David Laton

Catholic University Journal of Law and Technology

This article explores the possible implications and consequences arising from the use of an artificial intelligence construct as a weapon of mass destruction. The digital age has ushered in many technological advances, as well as certain dangers. Chief among these pitfalls is the lack of reliable security found in critical information technology systems. These security gaps can give cybercriminals unauthorized access to highly sensitive computer networks that control the very infrastructure of the United States. Cyberattacks are rising in both frequency and severity and the response by the U.S. has been ineffective. A cyber-weapon of mass destruction (CWMD) implementing ...


Thriving In The Online Environment: Creating Structures To Promote Technology And Civil Liberties, Daniel W. Sutherland 2017 U.S. Department of Homeland Security

Thriving In The Online Environment: Creating Structures To Promote Technology And Civil Liberties, Daniel W. Sutherland

Catholic University Journal of Law and Technology

No abstract provided.


Telecommunications Infrastructure: Another O-Ring In The Economic Development Of The Third World, James Germano 2017 Williams Mullen

Telecommunications Infrastructure: Another O-Ring In The Economic Development Of The Third World, James Germano

Catholic University Journal of Law and Technology

No abstract provided.


Targeted Advertising And The First Amendment: Student Privacy Vs. Protected Speech, Marco Crocetti 2017 Holland & Knight LLP

Targeted Advertising And The First Amendment: Student Privacy Vs. Protected Speech, Marco Crocetti

Catholic University Journal of Law and Technology

No abstract provided.


How Many Likes Did It Get? Using Social Media Metrics To Establish Trademark Rights, Caroline Mrohs 2017 The Catholic University of America, Columbus School of Law

How Many Likes Did It Get? Using Social Media Metrics To Establish Trademark Rights, Caroline Mrohs

Catholic University Journal of Law and Technology

This comment asserts that there is a need for an update to the multifactor test considered by courts in determining the strength of a trademark. Traditional factors include the expenses an entity can afford to pay in advertising, but do not give any weight to the presence of the entity on social media to reach its target consumer group.


Autonomous Cars: Navigating The Patchwork Of Data Privacy Laws That Could Impact The Industry, Anthony Jones 2017 Catholic University of America (Student)

Autonomous Cars: Navigating The Patchwork Of Data Privacy Laws That Could Impact The Industry, Anthony Jones

Catholic University Journal of Law and Technology

No abstract provided.


Is Wifi Worth It: The Hidden Dangers Of Public Wifi, Ellie Shahin 2017 Catholic University of America (Student)

Is Wifi Worth It: The Hidden Dangers Of Public Wifi, Ellie Shahin

Catholic University Journal of Law and Technology

No abstract provided.


The Ambiguity Of Redesignation: What Is 'Applicable' Under The Clean Air Act?, Andrew Miller 2017 Catholic University of America (Student)

The Ambiguity Of Redesignation: What Is 'Applicable' Under The Clean Air Act?, Andrew Miller

Catholic University Journal of Law and Technology

No abstract provided.


Table Of Contents, 2017 The Catholic University of America, Columbus School of Law

Table Of Contents

Catholic University Journal of Law and Technology

No abstract provided.


Masthead, 2017 The Catholic University of America, Columbus School of Law

Masthead

Catholic University Journal of Law and Technology

No abstract provided.


Flying Under The Radar: Low-Altitude Local Drone Use And The Reentry Of Property Rights, Kenneth Maher 2017 Duke Law

Flying Under The Radar: Low-Altitude Local Drone Use And The Reentry Of Property Rights, Kenneth Maher

Duke Law & Technology Review

The characteristics and capabilities of civilian drones have proliferated in recent years, giving rise to a burgeoning industry. The popular media and academic literature have predominantly focused on privacy concerns, devoting considerably less attention to the regulatory challenges created by the new technology. Congress instructed the FAA to integrate drones into the National Airspace System in 2012, but rulemaking delays and a moratorium on commercial uses hampered the industry and withheld benefits from the public. Final regulations are now in place, but the new rules revive legal uncertainty over the constitutional limits of federal authority and the ambiguous vertical bounds ...


Drones And Privacy In The Golden State, Brandon Gonzalez 2017 Santa Clara Law

Drones And Privacy In The Golden State, Brandon Gonzalez

Santa Clara High Technology Law Journal

Drones and Privacy in the Golden State


3d-Printed Food, Jasper L. Tran 2017 George Mason University

3d-Printed Food, Jasper L. Tran

Jasper L. Tran

No abstract provided.


Managing Cyberthreat, Lawrence J. Trautman 2017 Santa Clara Law

Managing Cyberthreat, Lawrence J. Trautman

Santa Clara High Technology Law Journal

Managing Cyberthreat


Plausibility Under The Defend Trade Secrets Act, 16 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 188 (2017), Michelle Evans 2017 John Marshall Law School

Plausibility Under The Defend Trade Secrets Act, 16 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 188 (2017), Michelle Evans

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

With the recent passage of the Defend Trade Secrets Act (DTSA), a federal civil cause of action for trade secret misappropriation is now available. To add some familiarity to the Act, the drafters incorporated definitions similar to those of the Uniform Trade Secrets Act (UTSA). However, even though the provisions may seem familiar, there is a new requirement that is not obvious on the face of the statute- the plausibility requirement for pleading under the federal rules. To understand plausibility; however, one must understand the DTSA. Unfortunately, there is no guidance from the DTSA that can aid interpretation of the ...


Alice-Backed Securitization: Start-Ups’ New Alternative To Venture Capital, 16 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 246 (2017), Robert Laverty 2017 John Marshall Law School

Alice-Backed Securitization: Start-Ups’ New Alternative To Venture Capital, 16 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 246 (2017), Robert Laverty

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

As of 2016, the United States software industry added $1.07 trillion in total value to the U.S. economy alone. Today, it’s no mystery that high-tech solutions are embedded in the fabric of our world. Venture Capital has been the dominant source of funding for startup and midsize high-tech firms for the last two decades. However, Venture Capital funding comes at a hefty cost. Young developing high-tech firms are often forced to bargain large shares of their ownership and managerial control to receive the funding they need to realize their potential. But, what if high-tech firms didn’t ...


Blocking Ad Blockers, 16 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 272 (2017), Tyler Barbacovi 2017 John Marshall Law School

Blocking Ad Blockers, 16 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 272 (2017), Tyler Barbacovi

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

The prevalence of ad blocking software (software that prevents the loading of web based advertisements) is a growing problem for website owners and content creators who rely on advertising revenue to earn money. While the number of ad block users continues to increase, there has thus far been no significant legal challenge to ad blocking in the United States. This comment examines how a website owner, through a combination of technological improvements and the anti-circumvention provisions of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, could successfully raise a legal challenge against the purveyors of ad blocking software.


An Empirical Study Of Law Journal Copyright Practices, 16 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 207 (2017), Brian Frye, Christopher Ryan, Franklin Runge 2017 John Marshall Law School

An Empirical Study Of Law Journal Copyright Practices, 16 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 207 (2017), Brian Frye, Christopher Ryan, Franklin Runge

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

This article presents an empirical study of the copyright practices of American law journals in relation to copyright ownership and fair use, based on a 24-question survey. It concludes that many American law journals have adopted copyright policies that are inconsistent with the expectations of legal scholars and the scope of copyright protection. Specifically, many law journals have adopted copyright policies that effectively preclude open-access publishing, and unnecessarily limit the fair use of copyrighted works. In addition, it appears that some law journals may not understand their own copyright policies. This article proposes the creation of a Code of Copyright ...


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