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Doctor's Orders: The Third Circuit Approves Short-Term Annuities As A Viable Planning Tool In Zahner V. Secretary Pennsylvania Department Of Human Services, Jennifer A. Ward 2016 Villanova University Charles Widger School of Law

Doctor's Orders: The Third Circuit Approves Short-Term Annuities As A Viable Planning Tool In Zahner V. Secretary Pennsylvania Department Of Human Services, Jennifer A. Ward

Villanova Law Review

No abstract provided.


Aging America, Thomas L. Shaffer 2016 Notre Dame Law School

Aging America, Thomas L. Shaffer

Thomas L. Shaffer

Professor Sarah Harper's assessment of the legal, political,

medical, and economic issues associated with old age in the

United States heralded the theme for this Symposium, "Aging

America." Her analysis turns, as she puts it, on "a fundamental

shift in the demographic structure of society. No longer will it be

the norm to have large numbers of young and small numbers of

old,"1 as it was when I was a boy (age 11 on V.J. Day, 1945).

"Rather, we are entering a world where age groups will be distributed

more or less equally across society-an age-symmetric society ...


Grow Up Virginia: Time To Change Our Filial Responsibility Law, Sylvia Macon 2016 University of Richmond

Grow Up Virginia: Time To Change Our Filial Responsibility Law, Sylvia Macon

Law Student Publications

This comment discusses the background and development of filial responsibility laws in England, the United States, and Virginia in Part I. Part II explains the purpose behind implementation of such laws while Part III discusses the problems enforcing the filial responsibility law may cause. Lastly, Part IV explains why past reasons for keeping the law are no longer valid.


Addressing The Ethical, Legal, And Social Issues Raised By Voting By Persons With Dementia, Jason H. Karlawish, Richard J. Bonnie, Paul S. Appelbaum, Constantine Lyketsos, Bryan James, David Knopman, Christopher Patusky, Rosalie A. Kane, Pamela S. Karlan 2016 University of Pennsylvania

Addressing The Ethical, Legal, And Social Issues Raised By Voting By Persons With Dementia, Jason H. Karlawish, Richard J. Bonnie, Paul S. Appelbaum, Constantine Lyketsos, Bryan James, David Knopman, Christopher Patusky, Rosalie A. Kane, Pamela S. Karlan

Bryan G Kane MD

This article addresses an emerging policy problem in the United States participation in the electoral process by citizens with dementia. At present, health care professionals, family caregivers, and long-term care staff lack adequate guidance to decide whether individuals with dementia should be precluded from or assisted in casting a ballot. Voting by persons with dementia raises a series of important questions about the autonomy of individuals with dementia, the integrity of the electoral process, and the prevention of fraud. Three subsidiary issues warrant special attention: development of a method to assess capacity to vote; identification of appropriate kinds of assistance ...


The Practice Of Elder Law, Stuart C. Bear 2016 Mitchell Hamline School of Law

The Practice Of Elder Law, Stuart C. Bear

Mitchell Hamline Law Review

No abstract provided.


Criminal And Adult Protection Financial Exploitation Laws In The United States: How Do The Statutes Measure Up To Existing Research?, Kevin E. Hansen, Jonathan Hampel, Sandra L. Reynolds, Iris C. Freeman 2016 Mitchell Hamline School of Law

Criminal And Adult Protection Financial Exploitation Laws In The United States: How Do The Statutes Measure Up To Existing Research?, Kevin E. Hansen, Jonathan Hampel, Sandra L. Reynolds, Iris C. Freeman

Mitchell Hamline Law Review

No abstract provided.


Person-Centered Guardianship: How The Rise Of Supported Decision-Making And Person-Centered Services Can Help Olmstead's Promise Get Here Faster, Sean Burke 2016 Mitchell Hamline School of Law

Person-Centered Guardianship: How The Rise Of Supported Decision-Making And Person-Centered Services Can Help Olmstead's Promise Get Here Faster, Sean Burke

Mitchell Hamline Law Review

No abstract provided.


Practical Islamic Estate Planning: A Short Primer, Imani Jaafar 2016 Mitchell Hamline School of Law

Practical Islamic Estate Planning: A Short Primer, Imani Jaafar

Mitchell Hamline Law Review

No abstract provided.


The New Minnesota Trust Code: Out With (Most Of) The Old And In With (Most Of) The Utc, Jennifer A. Maas 2016 Mitchell Hamline School of Law

The New Minnesota Trust Code: Out With (Most Of) The Old And In With (Most Of) The Utc, Jennifer A. Maas

Mitchell Hamline Law Review

No abstract provided.


Sending The Wrong Message: The Current State Of Minnesota Law Raises Multiple Barriers To Meaningful Resolution For Our Elder Population When Bringing Medical Malpractice Claims, Suzanne M. Scheller 2016 Mitchell Hamline School of Law

Sending The Wrong Message: The Current State Of Minnesota Law Raises Multiple Barriers To Meaningful Resolution For Our Elder Population When Bringing Medical Malpractice Claims, Suzanne M. Scheller

Mitchell Hamline Law Review

No abstract provided.


Able Act Accounts: Achieving A Better Life Experience For Individuals With Disabilities With Tax-Preferred Savings (And The Old Reliable Special And Supplemental Needs Trusts), David A. Rephan, Joelle Groshek 2016 Mitchell Hamline School of Law

Able Act Accounts: Achieving A Better Life Experience For Individuals With Disabilities With Tax-Preferred Savings (And The Old Reliable Special And Supplemental Needs Trusts), David A. Rephan, Joelle Groshek

Mitchell Hamline Law Review

No abstract provided.


Lawyers And The Secret Welfare State, Milan Markovic 2016 Texas A&M University School of Law

Lawyers And The Secret Welfare State, Milan Markovic

Milan Markovic

This Article suggests that the United States maintains a secret welfare state. The secret welfare state exists because of lawyers’ ubiquitous use of questionable practices in representing clients before benefit-granting government agencies, which enable thousands of individual to collect public benefits who may not qualify for them. This Article focuses in particular on lawyers’ handling of evidence of nondisability in Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) proceedings and participation in Medicaid planning. It may be possible that the legal profession’s central role in the distribution of public benefits is an obstacle to a fairer and more transparent social safety net.


Financial Elder Abuse: New York State Prevalence, Interventions, & Future Directions, Danen Danielak 2016 The College at Brockport

Financial Elder Abuse: New York State Prevalence, Interventions, & Future Directions, Danen Danielak

Senior Honors Theses

Millions of older adults living in the United States are victims of elder abuse and financial exploitation is the most common form of abuse. Additionally, the adult population age 65 and older is projected to more than double by 2060 (Colby & Ortman, 2015) which will increase the likelihood of elder abuse. New York State has a substantial older adult population, was the focus of largest and most comprehensive elder abuse prevalence study, and utilizes multiple forms of financial abuse interventions including the widely supported use of multidisciplinary teams. Thus, the purpose of this thesis is to describe the prevalence and ...


Productivity And Affinity In The Age Of Dignity, Stephen Lee 2016 University of California, Irvine School of Law

Productivity And Affinity In The Age Of Dignity, Stephen Lee

Michigan Law Review

This Review proceeds as follows. Part I summarizes The Age of Dignity. Part II explains how this segment of immigrant workers challenges the productivity/affinity binary that dominates immigration law’s formal migration rules. Part III shows how this binary sets up dual migration streams, both of which could account for future flows of care workers. As Part III shows, the example of the eldercare industry nicely illustrates how the employment based and family-based migration systems simply represent two different ways of filling labor needs. I then conclude.


Judge Halts End-Of-Life Decision-Making For Nursing Home Patients, Bob Egelko 2016 SFGate.com

Judge Halts End-Of-Life Decision-Making For Nursing Home Patients, Bob Egelko

Interviews

An Alameda County judge has ordered state health officials to stop allowing doctors at nursing homes to administer psychiatric drugs or make end-of-life decisions for patients the doctors consider mentally incompetent. An interview with Professor Mort Cohen


Selective Issues In Effective Medicaid Estate Recovery Statutes, Raymond C. O'Brien 2016 The Catholic University of America, Columbus School of Law

Selective Issues In Effective Medicaid Estate Recovery Statutes, Raymond C. O'Brien

Catholic University Law Review

Medicaid is a joint federal-state partnership program that provides medical care to the elderly, blind, and disabled poor. Unlike Medicare, Medicaid will pay for long-term care, leading millions of persons in need of such care to “spend-down” income or assets to qualify as sufficiently needy or poor. However, the state can eventually seek recovery of expenditures made through estate recovery programs following the death of both spouses. As it currently stands, states have no choice but to become increasingly vigilant in pursuing private funds in order to pay for Medicaid expenditures. As a result, elderly citizens and their families will ...


Measuring Older Adult Confidence In The Courts And Law Enforcement, Joseph A. Hamm, Lindsey E. Wylie, Eve M. Brank 2016 Michigan State University

Measuring Older Adult Confidence In The Courts And Law Enforcement, Joseph A. Hamm, Lindsey E. Wylie, Eve M. Brank

Faculty Publications, Department of Psychology

Older adults are an increasingly relevant subpopulation for criminal justice policy but, as yet, are largely neglected in the relevant research. The current research addresses this by reporting on a psychometric evaluation of a measure of older adults’ Confidence in Legal Institutions (CLI). Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) provided support for the unidimensionality and reliability of the measures. In addition, participants’ CLI was related to cynicism, trust in government, dispositional trust, age, and education, but not income or gender. The results provide support for the measures of confidence in the courts and law enforcement, so we present the scale as a ...


The (Ir)Rationality Of (Un)Informed Consent, Barbara A. Noah 2016 Westen New England University School of Law

The (Ir)Rationality Of (Un)Informed Consent, Barbara A. Noah

Faculty Scholarship

This essay considers the problem of over-utilization of medical care at the end of life and the lack of truly informed consent and briefly considers the multiple causes of these phenomena. It then explores the inherent challenges to making informed medical decisions using concepts of Knightian uncertainty, bounded rationality, optimism bias, and other heuristics. The essay concludes that uncertainty inherent in these decisions means that challenges to making truly informed decisions about medical care are even more substantial than physicians acknowledge or patients ever realize. Acknowledging these challenges is the first step to better medical decision making. informed consent has ...


Selective Issues In Effective Medicaid Estate Recovery Statutes, Raymond C. O'Brien 2016 The Catholic University of America, Columbus School of Law

Selective Issues In Effective Medicaid Estate Recovery Statutes, Raymond C. O'Brien

Scholarly Articles and Other Contributions

Medicaid is a joint federal-state partnership program that provides medical care to the elderly, blind, and disabled poor. Unlike Medicare, Medicaid will pay for long-term care, leading millions of persons in need of such care to “spend-down” income or assets to qualify as sufficiently needy or poor. However, the state can eventually seek recovery of expenditures made through estate recovery programs following the death of both spouses. As it currently stands, states have no choice but to become increasingly vigilant in pursuing private funds in order to pay for Medicaid expenditures. As a result, elderly citizens and their families will ...


Avoiding Overtreatment At The End Of Life: Physician-Patient Communication And Truly Informed Consent, Barbara A. Noah, Neal R. Feigenson 2016 Westen New England University School of Law

Avoiding Overtreatment At The End Of Life: Physician-Patient Communication And Truly Informed Consent, Barbara A. Noah, Neal R. Feigenson

Faculty Scholarship

This Article considers how best to ensure that patients have the tools to make informed choices about their care as they near death. Informed decision making can help reduce excessive end-of-life care and unnecessary suffering, and result in care that aligns with patients’ well-considered values and preferences. The many factors that contribute to dying patients receiving too much therapy and life-prolonging care include: the culture of denial of death, physicians’ professional culture and attitudes toward treatment, physicians’ fear of liability, physicians’ avoidance of discussions about prognosis, and the impact of payment incentives that encourage overutilization of medical technologies.

Under the ...


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