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Who Knows What, And When?: A Survey Of The Privacy Policies Proffered By U.S. Direct-To-Consumer Genetic Testing Companies, Christopher Slobogin, James W. Hazel 2019 Center for Genetic Privacy & Identity

Who Knows What, And When?: A Survey Of The Privacy Policies Proffered By U.S. Direct-To-Consumer Genetic Testing Companies, Christopher Slobogin, James W. Hazel

Christopher Slobogin

Direct-to-consumer genetic testing (DTC-GT) companies have proliferated in the past several years. Based on an analysis of genetic material submitted by consumers, these companies offer a wide array of services, ranging from providing information about health and ancestry to identification of surreptitiously-gatheredb iological materials ent in by suspicious spouses. Federal and state laws are ambiguous about the types of disclosures these companies must make about how the genetic information they obtain is collected, used, and shared. In an effort to assist in developing such laws, this Article reports a survey of the privacy policies these companies purport to follow. It ...


Is It Time For A Universal Genetic Forensic Database?, Christopher Slobogin, Ellen Wright Clayton, J. W. Hazel, B. A. Malin 2019 Center for Biomedical Ethics and Society

Is It Time For A Universal Genetic Forensic Database?, Christopher Slobogin, Ellen Wright Clayton, J. W. Hazel, B. A. Malin

Christopher Slobogin

The ethical objections to mandating forensic profiling of newborns and/or compelling every citizen or visitor to submit to a buccal swab or to spit in a cup when they have done nothing wrong are not trivial. But newborns are already subject to compulsory medical screening, and people coming from foreign countries to the United States already submit to fingerprinting. It is also worth noting that concerns about coercion or invasions of privacy did not give pause to legislatures (or, for that matter, even the European Court) when authorizing compelled DNA sampling from arrestees, who should not forfeit genetic privacy ...


Is It Time For A Universal Genetic Forensic Database?, Christopher Slobogin, Ellen Wright Clayton, J. W. Hazel, B. A. Malin 2019 Center for Biomedical Ethics and Society

Is It Time For A Universal Genetic Forensic Database?, Christopher Slobogin, Ellen Wright Clayton, J. W. Hazel, B. A. Malin

Ellen Wright Clayton

The ethical objections to mandating forensic profiling of newborns and/or compelling every citizen or visitor to submit to a buccal swab or to spit in a cup when they have done nothing wrong are not trivial. But newborns are already subject to compulsory medical screening, and people coming from foreign countries to the United States already submit to fingerprinting. It is also worth noting that concerns about coercion or invasions of privacy did not give pause to legislatures (or, for that matter, even the European Court) when authorizing compelled DNA sampling from arrestees, who should not forfeit genetic privacy ...


Bytes Bite: Why Corporate Data Breaches Should Give Standing To Affected Individuals, Caden Hayes 2019 Washington and Lee University School of Law

Bytes Bite: Why Corporate Data Breaches Should Give Standing To Affected Individuals, Caden Hayes

Washington and Lee Journal of Civil Rights and Social Justice

High-profile data hacks are not uncommon. In fact, according to the Privacy Rights Clearinghouse, there have been at least 7,961 data breaches, exposing over 10,000,000,000 accounts in total, since 2005. These shocking numbers are not particularly surprising when taking into account the value of information stolen. For example, cell phone numbers, as exposed in a Yahoo! hack, are worth $10 a piece on the black market, meaning the hackers stood to make $30,000,000,000 from that one hack. That dollar amount does not even consider copies the hackers could make and later resell. Yet ...


Table Of Contents, Seattle University Law Review 2019 Seattle University School of Law

Table Of Contents, Seattle University Law Review

Seattle University Law Review

No abstract provided.


Breaches Within Breaches: The Crossroads Of Erisa Fiduciary Responsibilities And Data Security, Gregg Moran 2019 University of Miami Law School

Breaches Within Breaches: The Crossroads Of Erisa Fiduciary Responsibilities And Data Security, Gregg Moran

University of Miami Law Review

Although the drafters of the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (“ERISA”) likely could not have anticipated the data security issues of the twenty-first century, ERISA’s duty of prudence almost certainly requires employee benefit plan fiduciaries to protect sensitive participant data in at least some manner. This Article suggests the Department of Labor should issue a regulation clarifying fiduciaries’ data security obligations. Given that fiduciaries are in the best positions to recognize their plans’ individual security needs and capabilities, the regulation should not attempt to micromanage fiduciaries’ substantive data security policies; rather, it should focus on the procedures ...


The Privacy Hierarchy: A Comparative Analysis Of The Intimate Privacy Protection Act Vs. The Geolocational Privacy And Surveillance Act, Katherine A. Mitchell 2019 University of Miami Law School

The Privacy Hierarchy: A Comparative Analysis Of The Intimate Privacy Protection Act Vs. The Geolocational Privacy And Surveillance Act, Katherine A. Mitchell

University of Miami Law Review

The advent of the technological boom brought the world smartphones, social media, and Siri. These novel benefits, however, were accompanied by unchartered invasions of privacy. Congress has embarked on the seemingly endless path of protecting its constituents through civil and criminal legislation aimed at combatting such invasions. Two recent examples include the Intimate Privacy Protection Act (“IPPA”) and the Geolocational Privacy and Surveillance Act (“GPS Act”). Nonetheless, the IPPA, which was proposed to criminalize the dissemination of nonconsensual pornography, has garnered much less support—and much more criticism—than its geolocational counterpart.

This Note discusses the striking similarities of both ...


Biometric Identification In India Versus The Right To Privacy: Core Constitutional Features, Defining Citizens’ Interests, And The Implications Of Biometric Identification In The United States, Madison Julia Levine 2019 University of Miami Law School

Biometric Identification In India Versus The Right To Privacy: Core Constitutional Features, Defining Citizens’ Interests, And The Implications Of Biometric Identification In The United States, Madison Julia Levine

University of Miami Law Review

In 2009, the Indian government introduced a widespread biometric identification system called Aadhaar—a national scheme that issues Indian citizens and residents a unique identification number while collecting and storing their most personal biometric and demographic information. As the Aadhaar system was implemented and promoted in India, widespread concerns grew regarding the storage and protection of such private information. How can Indian citizens enforce and protect their privacy rights? In 2017, the Indian Supreme Court attempted to address this issue by holding that an individual’s right to privacy is an inherent part of the right to life and personal ...


Big Data Discrimination: Maintaining Protection Of Individual Privacy Without Disincentivizing Businesses’ Use Of Biometric Data To Enhance Security, Lauren Stewart 2019 Boston College Law School

Big Data Discrimination: Maintaining Protection Of Individual Privacy Without Disincentivizing Businesses’ Use Of Biometric Data To Enhance Security, Lauren Stewart

Boston College Law Review

Biometric identification technology is playing an increasingly significant role in the lives of consumers in the United States today. Despite the benefits of increased data security and ease of consumer access to businesses’ services, lack of widespread biometric data regulation creates the potential for commercial misuse. Of particular concern is the use of biometric data by businesses, such as those within the data broker industry, to enable opaque discrimination against consumers. Although some states, such as Illinois, Texas, and Washington, have adopted comprehensive biometric data regulation statutes, the statutes do not offer a consistent approach. This Note argues that Congress ...


Likes And Retweets Can't Save Your Job: Public Employee Privacy, Free Speech, And Social Media, Frank E. Langan 2019 University of St. Thomas, Minnesota

Likes And Retweets Can't Save Your Job: Public Employee Privacy, Free Speech, And Social Media, Frank E. Langan

University of St. Thomas Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Lowering Legal Barriers To Rpki Adoption, Christopher S. Yoo, David A. Wishnick 2019 University of Pennsylvania Law School

Lowering Legal Barriers To Rpki Adoption, Christopher S. Yoo, David A. Wishnick

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

Across the Internet, mistaken and malicious routing announcements impose significant costs on users and network operators. To make routing announcements more reliable and secure, Internet coordination bodies have encouraged network operators to adopt the Resource Public Key Infrastructure (“RPKI”) framework. Despite this encouragement, RPKI’s adoption rates are low, especially in North America.

This report presents the results of a year-long investigation into the hypothesis—widespread within the network operator community—that legal issues pose barriers to RPKI adoption and are one cause of the disparities between North America and other regions of the world. On the basis of interviews ...


Predictability For Privacy In Data Driven Government, Jordan Blanke, Janine Hiller 2019 Mercer University

Predictability For Privacy In Data Driven Government, Jordan Blanke, Janine Hiller

Minnesota Journal of Law, Science & Technology

No abstract provided.


Deepfakes: False Pornography Is Here And The Law Cannot Protect You, Douglas Harris 2019 Duke Law

Deepfakes: False Pornography Is Here And The Law Cannot Protect You, Douglas Harris

Duke Law & Technology Review

It is now possible for anyone with rudimentary computer skills to create a pornographic deepfake portraying an individual engaging in a sex act that never actually occurred. These realistic videos, called “deepfakes,” use artificial intelligence software to impose a person’s face onto another person’s body. While pornographic deepfakes were first created to produce videos of celebrities, they are now being generated to feature other nonconsenting individuals—like a friend or a classmate. This Article argues that several tort doctrines and recent non-consensual pornography laws are unable to handle published deepfakes of non-celebrities. Instead, a federal criminal statute prohibiting ...


Privacy In Gaming, N. Cameron Russell, Joel R. Reidenberg, Sumyung Moon 2019 Fordham University

Privacy In Gaming, N. Cameron Russell, Joel R. Reidenberg, Sumyung Moon

Fordham Intellectual Property, Media and Entertainment Law Journal

Video game platforms and business models are increasingly built on collection, use, and sharing of personal information for purposes of both functionality and revenue. This paper examines privacy issues and explores data practices, technical specifications, and policy statements of the most popular games and gaming platforms to provide an overview of the current privacy legal landscape for mobile gaming, console gaming, and virtual reality devices. The research observes how modern gaming aligns with information privacy notions and norms and how data practices and technologies specific to gaming may affect users and, in particular, child gamers.

After objectively selecting and analyzing ...


Data Scraping As A Cause Of Action: Limiting Use Of The Cfaa And Trespass In Online Copying Cases, Kathleen C. Riley 2019 Fordham University School of Law

Data Scraping As A Cause Of Action: Limiting Use Of The Cfaa And Trespass In Online Copying Cases, Kathleen C. Riley

Fordham Intellectual Property, Media and Entertainment Law Journal

In recent years, online platforms have used claims such as the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (“CFAA”) and trespass to curb data scraping, or copying of web content accomplished using robots or web crawlers. However, as the term “data scraping” implies, the content typically copied is data or information that is not protected by intellectual property law, and the means by which the copying occurs is not considered to be hacking. Trespass and the CFAA are both concerned with authorization, but in data scraping cases, these torts are used in such a way that implies that real property norms exist ...


A Constitutional Hope: An Alternative Approach To The Right Of Privacy And Marijuana Laws Using Argentina As An Example, Kevin E. Szmuc 2018 University of Miami Law School

A Constitutional Hope: An Alternative Approach To The Right Of Privacy And Marijuana Laws Using Argentina As An Example, Kevin E. Szmuc

University of Miami International and Comparative Law Review

No abstract provided.


Cybersecurity, Shareholders, And The Boardroom: An Analysis Of Current And Proposed Measures For Protecting Corporate Intellectual Property, Kathryn V. Wymer 2018 University of Georgia School of Law

Cybersecurity, Shareholders, And The Boardroom: An Analysis Of Current And Proposed Measures For Protecting Corporate Intellectual Property, Kathryn V. Wymer

Journal of Intellectual Property Law

No abstract provided.


A Duty To Safeguard: Data Breach Litigation Through A Quasi-Bailment Lens, Miles Christian Skedvold 2018 University of Georgia School of Law

A Duty To Safeguard: Data Breach Litigation Through A Quasi-Bailment Lens, Miles Christian Skedvold

Journal of Intellectual Property Law

No abstract provided.


Privacy Localism, Ira S. Rubinstein 2018 University of Washington School of Law

Privacy Localism, Ira S. Rubinstein

Washington Law Review

Privacy law scholarship often focuses on domain-specific federal privacy laws and state efforts to broaden them. This Article provides the first comprehensive analysis of privacy regulation at the local level (which it dubs “privacy localism”), using recently enacted privacy laws in Seattle and New York City as principal examples. Further, this Article attributes the rise of privacy localism to a combination of federal and state legislative failures and three emerging urban trends: the role of local police in federal counterterrorism efforts; smart city and open data initiatives; and demands for local police reform in the wake of widely reported abusive ...


Privacy Spaces, Bert-Japp Koops 2018 Tilburg Insitute for Law, Technology and Society

Privacy Spaces, Bert-Japp Koops

West Virginia Law Review

Privacy literature contains conceptualizations of privacy in relation to role-playing and identity construction, and in relation to access control and boundary-management. In this paper, I combine both strands to introduce the concept of privacy spaces: spaces in which you can play, in your own way, the relevant role(s) you have in social life. Drawing from privacy conceptions in legal scholarship, philosophy, sociology, anthropology, human geography, and psychology, a systematic overview of traditional privacy spaces is offered, including mental bubbles, the body, personal space, personal writings, the home, private conversation space, cars, stalls, intimacy bubbles, professional black boxes, coffee house ...


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