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1751 full-text articles. Page 1 of 39.

Balancing A Right To Be Forgotten With A Right To Freedom Of Expression In The Wake Of Google Spain V. Aepd, Shaniqua Singleton 2016 University of Georgia School of Law

Balancing A Right To Be Forgotten With A Right To Freedom Of Expression In The Wake Of Google Spain V. Aepd, Shaniqua Singleton

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


Police Body Worn Cameras And Privacy: Retaining Benefits While Reducing Public Concerns, Richard Lin 2016 Duke Law

Police Body Worn Cameras And Privacy: Retaining Benefits While Reducing Public Concerns, Richard Lin

Duke Law & Technology Review

Recent high-profile incidents of police misconduct have led to calls for increased police accountability. One proposed reform is to equip police officers with body worn cameras, which provide more reliable evidence than eyewitness accounts. However, such cameras may pose privacy concerns for individuals who are recorded, as the footage may fall under open records statutes that would require the footage to be released upon request. Furthermore, storage of video data is costly, and redaction of video for release is time-consuming. While exempting all body camera video from release would take care of privacy issues, it would also prevent the public ...


Trending @ Rwu Law: Linn F. Freedman's Post: The Goal Of Gender Equality In Cybersecurity 08/23/2016, Linn F. Freedman 2016 Roger Williams University School of Law

Trending @ Rwu Law: Linn F. Freedman's Post: The Goal Of Gender Equality In Cybersecurity 08/23/2016, Linn F. Freedman

Law School Blogs

No abstract provided.


Controversy Over Information Privacy Arising From The Taiwan National Health Insurance Database Examining The Taiwan Taipei High Administrative Court Judgement No. 102-Su-36 (Tsai V. Nhia), Chen-Hung Chang 2016 American University Washington College of Law

Controversy Over Information Privacy Arising From The Taiwan National Health Insurance Database Examining The Taiwan Taipei High Administrative Court Judgement No. 102-Su-36 (Tsai V. Nhia), Chen-Hung Chang

Pace International Law Review

This article examines the limitations of the application of traditional information privacy theory to disputes relating to modern technologies. If information privacy is understood as an individual’s right to full control over his information, activities involving the collection, process and use of personal data cannot be conducted without the data subject’s consent because his privacy rights would be affected as a result of such activities. Instead of the privacy interest approach, this article introduces a privacy harm approach to reconcile the defects of traditional privacy theory. The privacy interest approach helps identify situations in which an individual’s ...


Cell Phone Searches After Riley: Establishing Probable Cause And Applying Search Warrant Exceptions, Erica L. Danielsen 2016 Pace University School of Law

Cell Phone Searches After Riley: Establishing Probable Cause And Applying Search Warrant Exceptions, Erica L. Danielsen

Pace Law Review

Part I of this note discusses the Fourth Amendment’s protection against unreasonable search and seizures and its probable cause requirement. The Fourth Amendment’s text remains the same since its enactment. However, interpretation of the Fourth Amendment continues to evolve in order to stay current with society. Interpretation of the Fourth Amendment also varies based on state constitutional law since states can provide its citizens with greater protection than the United States Constitution. This is why the United States Supreme Court, federal district courts, and state courts have all undergone thorough Fourth Amendment analyses when applying the true meaning ...


That ‘70s Show: Why The 11th Circuit Was Wrong To Rely On Cases From The 1970s To Decide A Cell-Phone Tracking Case, David Oscar Markus, Nathan Freed Wessler 2016 University of Miami Law School

That ‘70s Show: Why The 11th Circuit Was Wrong To Rely On Cases From The 1970s To Decide A Cell-Phone Tracking Case, David Oscar Markus, Nathan Freed Wessler

University of Miami Law Review

In light of society's increasing reliance on technology, this article explores a critical question – that of the Fourth Amendment’s protection over privacy in the digital age. Specifically, this article addresses how the law currently fails to protect the privacy of one’s cell phone records and its ramifications. By highlighting the antiquated precedent leading up to the Eleventh Circuit’s ruling in United States v. Davis, this article calls on the judiciary to find a more appropriate balance for protecting the right to privacy in a modern society.


Cellphones, Stingrays, And Searches! An Inquiry Into The Legality Of Cellular Location Information, Jeremy H. D'Amico 2016 University of Miami Law School

Cellphones, Stingrays, And Searches! An Inquiry Into The Legality Of Cellular Location Information, Jeremy H. D'Amico

University of Miami Law Review

Can the Fourth Amendment protect an individual’s right privacy by preventing the disclosure of her location through cell site location information? Does it currently? Should it? Many court opinions answer these questions in both the affirmative and the negative. The rationale underlying each conclusion is disparate. Some rely on statutory regimes, others rely on the United States Supreme Court’s interpretation of reasonableness. However, Cell Site Location Information is a technology that requires uniformity in its interpretation. This note investigates the different interpretations of the Fourth Amendment as it relates to Cell Site Location Information. It explains the technology ...


Wearable Fitness Devices: Personal Health Data Privacy In Washington State, Steven Spann 2016 Seattle University School of Law

Wearable Fitness Devices: Personal Health Data Privacy In Washington State, Steven Spann

Seattle University Law Review

Private entities are increasingly targeting individuals in the United States and around the world to gather personal data for such purposes as product development, market identification, and insurance risk assessment. While credit card records and online browsing histories have long been the medium through which this data is gathered, in more recent years, wearable fitness devices have added a new dimension to data production and collection. These devices are capable of gathering a significant amount of data regarding a person’s physical and physiological characteristics, thereby exposing these data producers to personal privacy infringement. Washington State lawmakers and citizens must ...


The Two Faces Of The Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court, Emily Berman 2016 University of Houston Law Center

The Two Faces Of The Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court, Emily Berman

Indiana Law Journal

When former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden leaked a massive trove of information about secret intelligence-collection programs implemented under the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act in the summer of 2013, U.S. surveillance activities were thrust to the forefront of public debate. This debate included the question of whether and how to reform the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court (“FISA Court”), the statutorily created secret court that reviews government applications to conduct surveillance in the United States. This discussion, however, has underemphasized a critical feature of the way the FISA Court works. As this Article will show, since the terrorist attacks ...


Taking A Bite Out Of Michael Vick's Publicity Rights: An Analysis Of How Teh Right Of Publicity Should Be Treated After A Celebrity Is Convicted Of A Crime, Stephen Reginald Fowler 2016 University of Georgia School of Law

Taking A Bite Out Of Michael Vick's Publicity Rights: An Analysis Of How Teh Right Of Publicity Should Be Treated After A Celebrity Is Convicted Of A Crime, Stephen Reginald Fowler

Journal of Intellectual Property Law

No abstract provided.


Rights Of Publicity: A Practitioner's Enigma, Gil N. Peles Esq. 2016 Proskauer Rose LLP

Rights Of Publicity: A Practitioner's Enigma, Gil N. Peles Esq.

Journal of Intellectual Property Law

No abstract provided.


Beyond Irbs: Ethical Guidelines For Data Research, Omer Tene, Jules Polonetsky 2016 Future of Privacy Forum

Beyond Irbs: Ethical Guidelines For Data Research, Omer Tene, Jules Polonetsky

Washington and Lee Law Review Online

No abstract provided.


It Stands To Reason: An Argument For Article Iii Standing Based On The Threat Of Future Harm In Data Breach Litigation, John Biglow 2016 University of Minnesota Law School

It Stands To Reason: An Argument For Article Iii Standing Based On The Threat Of Future Harm In Data Breach Litigation, John Biglow

Minnesota Journal of Law, Science & Technology

No abstract provided.


An Unconstitutional Work Of Art: Discussing Where The Federal Government's Discrete Intrusions Into One's Privacy Become An Unconstitutional Search Through Mosaic Theory, Steven Graziano 2016 University of Minnesota Law School

An Unconstitutional Work Of Art: Discussing Where The Federal Government's Discrete Intrusions Into One's Privacy Become An Unconstitutional Search Through Mosaic Theory, Steven Graziano

Minnesota Journal of Law, Science & Technology

No abstract provided.


Clapper Dethroned: Imminent Injury And Standing For Data Breach Lawsuits In Light Of Ashley Madison, Arthur R. Vorbrodt 2016 Washington and Lee University School of Law

Clapper Dethroned: Imminent Injury And Standing For Data Breach Lawsuits In Light Of Ashley Madison, Arthur R. Vorbrodt

Washington and Lee Law Review Online

No abstract provided.


If You Fly A Drone, So Can Police, Stephen E. Henderson 2016 University of Oklahoma College of Law

If You Fly A Drone, So Can Police, Stephen E. Henderson

Stephen E Henderson


According to the U.S. Constitution, the more you fly your drone, the more police can fly theirs. “Come on,” you might reply, “that hoary document”—and, yes, sorry to make you the sort who drops words like hoary—“that hoary document surely says nothing about drones.” But in fact it does. At least it does as interpreted by the courts. In particular, it is how they interpret the Fourth Amendment. So, to understand this aspect of drones, we first must understand this provision of the Bill of Rights...


Table Of Contents, 2016 The Catholic University of America, Columbus School of Law

Table Of Contents

Catholic University Journal of Law and Technology

No abstract provided.


Baring All: Legal Ethics And Confidentiality Of Electronically Stored Information In The Cloud, Whitney Morgan 2016 Catholic University of America (Student)

Baring All: Legal Ethics And Confidentiality Of Electronically Stored Information In The Cloud, Whitney Morgan

Catholic University Journal of Law and Technology

No abstract provided.


Wearable Devices As Admissible Evidence: Technology Is Killing Our Opportunity To Lie, Nicole Chauriye 2016 Catholic University of America, Columbus School of Law

Wearable Devices As Admissible Evidence: Technology Is Killing Our Opportunity To Lie, Nicole Chauriye

Catholic University Journal of Law and Technology

No abstract provided.


Exporting Internet Law Through International Trade Agreements: Recalibrating U.S. Trade Policy In The Digital Age, Markham C. Erickson, Sarah K. Leggin 2016 Steptoe & Johnson LLP

Exporting Internet Law Through International Trade Agreements: Recalibrating U.S. Trade Policy In The Digital Age, Markham C. Erickson, Sarah K. Leggin

Catholic University Journal of Law and Technology

No abstract provided.


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