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3,326 full-text articles. Page 1 of 55.

Masthead, 2020 University of California, Hastings College of the Law

Masthead

Hastings Communications and Entertainment Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Going “All In” After Murphy V. Ncaa: An Approach For California To Legalize Sports Gambling, Kailey J. Walsh 2020 University of California, Hastings College of the Law

Going “All In” After Murphy V. Ncaa: An Approach For California To Legalize Sports Gambling, Kailey J. Walsh

Hastings Communications and Entertainment Law Journal

When people think of sports gambling, they think of Las Vegas. Until recently, Nevada was the only state where one could legally place bets on sporting events. However, since the recent Supreme Court decision, Murphy v. NCAA, states are now in control when it comes to deciding whether or not to legalize sports gambling. As a result of the Murphy v. NCAA decision, some states have started to pass legislation to allow its citizens to legally place bets on certain sporting events. The driving force to legalize sports gambling stems from states’ desires to increase revenue through the taxation of ...


This Is No Laughing Matter: How Should Comedians Be Able To Protect Their Jokes?, Sarah Gamblin 2020 University of California, Hastings College of the Law

This Is No Laughing Matter: How Should Comedians Be Able To Protect Their Jokes?, Sarah Gamblin

Hastings Communications and Entertainment Law Journal

This note will discuss the current state of protection for jokes and comedy. As it is now, the only protection comics have is self-help, meaning comedians take punishing thefts into their own hands. This note will dive into the reasons why the current legislature and courts refuse to recognize jokes as copyrightable. Specifically, why many believe that jokes to not meet the qualifications of being an expression, as well as the fear that protecting jokes will lead to chilled speech.

Additionally, this note shall discuss the ways jokes could be protected under the current legal scheme, including trademark and state ...


Leveraging The Ilo For Human Rights And Workers’ Rights In International Sporting Events, Dantam Le 2020 University of California, Hastings College of the Law

Leveraging The Ilo For Human Rights And Workers’ Rights In International Sporting Events, Dantam Le

Hastings Communications and Entertainment Law Journal

Sports majorly impact the world, and millions of fans from all over the globe rally together with pride to watch their countries compete on the world’s stage in international sporting events such as the Olympic Games and the World Cup. Studies suggest that mega sporting events help host cities gain an influx of resources from the central government relative to non-host cities in the same country, and that this may be particularly important in periods of economic recession and resource scarcity. Sports play a central role in quality education for all, and sports have been found to advance public ...


The Shield And The Sword: The Press Between The Public Interest And The Illegal Interception Of Private Communications, Andres Calderon 2020 University of California, Hastings College of the Law

The Shield And The Sword: The Press Between The Public Interest And The Illegal Interception Of Private Communications, Andres Calderon

Hastings Communications and Entertainment Law Journal

Journalism is not only under the attack of fake news and post-truth politics. Its main enemy comes from within. Malpractices of journalism such as the fabrication of sources and fake stories and illegal intrusion in people’s privacy are part of the equation that leads to people’s distrust in news organization.

This article addresses two very related topics that, nevertheless, have not been sufficiently studied as part of the same phenomenon: the reporter’s privilege to protect his sources’ identity and its connection with a journalist’s involvement in the illegal hacking or interception of private communications.

After reviewing ...


Any Safe Harbor In A Storm: Sesta-Fosta And The Future Of § 230 Of The Communications Decency Act, Charles Matula 2020 Duke Law

Any Safe Harbor In A Storm: Sesta-Fosta And The Future Of § 230 Of The Communications Decency Act, Charles Matula

Duke Law & Technology Review

No abstract provided.


The Use Of Digital Millenium Copyright Act To Stifle Speech Through Non-Copyright Related Takedowns, Miller Freeman 2020 Seattle University School of Law

The Use Of Digital Millenium Copyright Act To Stifle Speech Through Non-Copyright Related Takedowns, Miller Freeman

Seattle Journal of Technology, Environmental & Innovation Law

In 1998, Congress passed the Digital Millennium Copyright Act. This law provided new methods of protecting copyright in online media. These protections shift the normal judicial process that would stop the publication of infringing materials to private actors: the online platforms. As a result, online platforms receive notices of infringement and issue takedowns of allegedly copyrighted works without the judicial process which normally considers the purpose of the original notice of infringement. In at least one case, discussed in detail below, this has resulted in a notice and takedown against an individual for reasons not related to the purpose of ...


Limited Privacy In “Pings:” Why Law Enforcement’S Use Of Cell-Site Simulators Does Not Categorically Violate The Fourth Amendment, Lara M. McMahon 2020 Washington and Lee University School of Law

Limited Privacy In “Pings:” Why Law Enforcement’S Use Of Cell-Site Simulators Does Not Categorically Violate The Fourth Amendment, Lara M. Mcmahon

Washington and Lee Law Review

This Note proposes four factors courts should consider when asked to determine whether law enforcement’s use of a cell-site simulator constituted a Fourth Amendment search. The first asks courts to consider whether the cell-site simulator surveillance infringed on a constitutionally protected area, such as the home. The second asks courts to consider the duration of the cell-site simulator surveillance. The third asks courts to consider whether the cell-site simulator surveillance was conducted actively or passively. The fourth asks courts to focus on the nature and depth of the information obtained as a result of the cell-site simulator surveillance. If ...


So Much To Comment On, So Little Time: Notice-And-Comment Requirements In Agency Informal Rulemaking Under The Administrative Procedure Act, Kadie Martin 2020 Boston College Law School

So Much To Comment On, So Little Time: Notice-And-Comment Requirements In Agency Informal Rulemaking Under The Administrative Procedure Act, Kadie Martin

Boston College Law Review

On February 1, 2019, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit decided National Lifeline Ass’n v. FCC. In National Lifeline Ass’n, the D.C. Circuit Court held that, by adopting changes to a tribal telecommunications subsidy that contradicted prior policy rationale after only a two-week comment period, the agency both: (1) acted in an arbitrary and capricious manner, and (2) violated procedural requirements of the Administrative Procedure Act (APA). National Lifeline Ass’n represented a matter of first impression among the federal circuit courts and established a minimum comment period of thirty days ...


Executive Authority And Free Speech: An Analysis On The Restraints Of Presidential Power, Leta Lohrmeyer 2020 University of Nebraska at Omaha

Executive Authority And Free Speech: An Analysis On The Restraints Of Presidential Power, Leta Lohrmeyer

Student Research and Creative Activity Fair

This analysis examines the implications of social media platforms in connection to free speech and presidential power. Specifically, this study will be drawing on a precedent legal case, Knight First Amendment Inst. v. Trump (2019) along with other cases that are relevant to this paper. This research is contributing to the literature by exploring the topic of how developing technology is influencing political communication. Results support the idea that the definition of public forum needs to be expanded and updated to include social media. Theoretical consequences for the role of social media in connection to executive authority and First Amendment ...


Promoting Journalism As Method, Erin C. Carroll 2020 Georgetown University Law Center

Promoting Journalism As Method, Erin C. Carroll

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

The marketplace of ideas has been a centerpiece of free speech jurisprudence for a century. According to the marketplace theory, the vigorous competition of ideas, free from government interference, is the surest path to truth. As our metaphorical marketplace has moved online, the competition has never been so heated. We should be drowning in truth. Yet, in reality, truth has perhaps never been more elusive.

As we struggle to promote democratic debate and surface truth in our chaotic networked public sphere, we are understandably drawn to familiar frames and tools. These include the source of the marketplace of ideas theory ...


Masthead, 2020 University of California, Hastings College of the Law

Masthead

Hastings Communications and Entertainment Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Are College Football Players Being Promised Big Nfl Bucks And Being Shortchanged In The Classroom And On The Field?, Melanie Navarro 2020 University of California, Hastings College of the Law

Are College Football Players Being Promised Big Nfl Bucks And Being Shortchanged In The Classroom And On The Field?, Melanie Navarro

Hastings Communications and Entertainment Law Journal

Football is America’s pastime. Over one hundred million people tuned in to watch this year’s Super Bowl. Sundays during football season are spent in front of a television rooting for our favorite teams. Football has been an integral part of American culture for over 120 years. But in recent years, football has lost yardage. Information regarding the causal link between head injuries on the football field and degenerative brain diseases has come to light. Thousands of former National Football League (“NFL”) players took part in a highly publicized class-action lawsuit against the league. Players alleged that the NFL ...


Enemy Of The People: The Ghost Of The F.C.C. Fairness Doctrine In The Age Of Alternative Facts, Ian Klein 2020 University of California, Hastings College of the Law

Enemy Of The People: The Ghost Of The F.C.C. Fairness Doctrine In The Age Of Alternative Facts, Ian Klein

Hastings Communications and Entertainment Law Journal

The FCC Fairness Doctrine required that all major broadcasting outlets spend equal time covering both sides of all controversial issues of national importance. The Fairness Doctrine remained the standard for decades before it stopped being enforced during the Reagan administration, and was removed from the Federal Register during the Obama administration. Since the Fairness Doctrine’s disappearance, the perception by conservatives and progressives alike has been that major media outlets display overt biases towards one political affiliation or the other. As it becomes harder to determine real news from “fake news,” Americans’ trust in media is at an all-time low ...


Forum Delegation: The Birth And Transposition Of A New Approach To Public Forum Doctrine, Brett Johnson, Shane C. Epping 2020 University of California, Hastings College of the Law

Forum Delegation: The Birth And Transposition Of A New Approach To Public Forum Doctrine, Brett Johnson, Shane C. Epping

Hastings Communications and Entertainment Law Journal

This paper introduces and explores the concept of forum delegation: the power of government officials to suggest which forums to allow speakers to use. The concept is born out of a recent legal battle between the University of Minnesota and conservative speaker Ben Shapiro, in which the UMN required Shapiro to speak in a venue away from the heart of campus due to concerns over the school’s ability to provide adequate security for the event. The paper first analyzes the UMN case to assess the constitutionality of forum delegation in the context of regulating speech and public universities. Next ...


Net Neutrality: An Explainer, Kincaid C. Brown 2020 University of Michigan Law School

Net Neutrality: An Explainer, Kincaid C. Brown

Law Librarian Scholarship

Net neutrality is the idea that internet services or broadband providers should treat all content streaming through their systems the same, and providers who use their discretion to create “fast lanes,” block particular content, or throttle (slow down) internet speeds are not in keeping with how the internet ought to work.


Corruption And College Sports: A Love Story, Andrea Cristiani Closa 2020 University of California, Hastings College of the Law

Corruption And College Sports: A Love Story, Andrea Cristiani Closa

Hastings Communications and Entertainment Law Journal

College sports are a staple of American tradition, bringing in hundreds of millions of viewers each year. Fans from all over the country root for their team’s success and hope they will be the ones to take home the national championship each year. Increasingly, however, college sports have been in the public eye for a very different reason: corruption. The National Collegiate Athletics Association’s (“NCAA”) Amateurism Rule, which prohibits student-athletes from receiving compensation, has contributed to this ongoing corruption. The NCAA insists upon its student-athletes remaining amateurs, even though its own rule is damaging the integrity of college ...


The Influencers: Facebook’S Libra, Public Blockchains, And The Ethical Considerations Of Centralization, Michele Benedetto Neitz 2019 Golden Gate University School of Law

The Influencers: Facebook’S Libra, Public Blockchains, And The Ethical Considerations Of Centralization, Michele Benedetto Neitz

Publications

The theoretical promise of blockchain technology is truly extraordinary: a peer-to-peer distributed immutable ledger that could revolutionize economies, societies, and even our daily lives. But what if blockchain technology is not as decentralized as people think? What are the ramifications if, in reality, a blockchain’s core decisions are actually influenced by small groups of people or corporations?

This short article seeks to answer that question, by demonstrating that decentralized public blockchains are only as immutable as the decentralization of their governance. Moreover, the announcement of Libra, Facebook’s new permissioned blockchain, shows a growing trend of centralized control around ...


Florida’S Public Records Law: Its Role In A Tragedy During Hurricane Irma, Patrick Sheehan 2019 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Florida’S Public Records Law: Its Role In A Tragedy During Hurricane Irma, Patrick Sheehan

Theses from the College of Journalism and Mass Communications

The Facts:On September 10, 2017, Hurricane Irma made landfall in Florida, and wreaked havoc across the state causing structural damage, flooding, and power outages. Among those effected by the power outage was the Hollywood Hills Rehabilitation Center, a nursing home in Hollywood, Florida. In preparation of the impending storm, the governor of Florida, Rick Scott, held “teleconference calls (Spencer, Kennedy, Licon, & Associated Press, 2018),”with nursing home and hospital officials, as well as emergency managers. During these conference calls, Scott gave top nursing home executives his personal cell phone number and told these executives should they experience any issues ...


Justice Thomas’S Concurrence Says Much—And Little—About Preemption Of State Net Neutrality Efforts, Daniel A. Lyons 2019 Boston College Law School

Justice Thomas’S Concurrence Says Much—And Little—About Preemption Of State Net Neutrality Efforts, Daniel A. Lyons

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

A little-noticed concurrence in denial of certiorari by Justice Clarence Thomas may have caused a wrinkle in the ongoing net neutrality debate. Late last month, the Supreme Court quietly declined to review Lipschultz v. Charter Advanced Services (MN), LLC, an Eighth Circuit decision preempting state VoIP regulation. While concurring in the denial, Justice Thomas raised concerns about the underlying theory of federal preemption, noting that “[i]t is doubtful that a federal policy – let alone a policy of nonregulation – is” sufficient to support conflict preemption.

Justice Thomas’s concurrence – joined by Justice Neil Gorsuch – casts an interesting shadow on the ...


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