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Abortion, Informed Consent And Regulatory Spillover, Alex Stein, Katherine Shaw 2016 Cardozo Law School

Abortion, Informed Consent And Regulatory Spillover, Alex Stein, Katherine Shaw

Alex Stein

The constitutional law of abortion stands on the untenable assumption that any state’s abortion regulations impact citizens of that state alone. On this understanding, the state’s boundaries demarcate the terrain on which women’s right to abortion clashes with state power to regulate that right.
 
This Article uncovers a previously unnoticed horizontal dimension of abortion regulation: the medical-malpractice penalties imposed upon doctors for failing to inform patients about abortion risks; the states’ power to define those risks, along with doctors’ informed-consent obligations and penalties; and, critically, the possibility that such standards might cross state lines. Planned Parenthood v ...


Can I Skype My Doctor? Limited Medicare Coverage Hinders Telemedicine’S Potential To Improve Health Care Access, Hana Sahdev 2016 Boston College Law School

Can I Skype My Doctor? Limited Medicare Coverage Hinders Telemedicine’S Potential To Improve Health Care Access, Hana Sahdev

Boston College Law Review

Telemedicine services, such as virtual consultations and remote patient monitoring, are revolutionizing health care delivery. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 (“ACA”) promotes the use of technology in health care reform as a means to increase quality and access while reducing costs. Despite the excitement around telemedicine, the lack of Medicare reimbursement hinders access and innovation. This Note analyzes the utilization of telemedicine to promote health care access for Medicare beneficiaries, and argues that legislative and regulatory changes are needed to reconcile current Medicare policies with the ACA’s encouragement of using telemedicine services. Specifically, this Note ...


Extracting Medical Injury Information From The Legal System To Improve Patient Safety In The Health System: A Social Utility Approach, Mary Chaffee 2016 University of Massachusetts School of Law

Extracting Medical Injury Information From The Legal System To Improve Patient Safety In The Health System: A Social Utility Approach, Mary Chaffee

University of Massachusetts Law Review

As many as 400,000 people die each year, and a million are injured, by preventable medical injuries sustained in the U.S. health system. Collection of data to enhance understanding of how unintended medical injuries happen is an essential part of harm-reduction strategies. While health system data collection and reporting processes have improved in recent years, the scope and intractability of the medical injuries problem demands new efforts. The legal system could contribute valuable medical injury data to patient safety efforts but current practices largely prevent it. In medical malpractice claims where parties settle, case information is routinely protected ...


Decoupling Vaccine Laws, Dorit Rubenstein Reiss 2016 UC Hastings College of the Law

Decoupling Vaccine Laws, Dorit Rubenstein Reiss

Boston College Law Review

School immunization requirements are an effective way of increasing vaccine rates and reducing outbreaks, but they may have a dark underside. Although such mandates protect the general public, the availability of exemptions may be open to exploitation as a tool to try to undermine other avenues for protecting the vaccine-deprived children themselves. This essay argues that exemptions from school immunization requirements should not be understood to limit the protections available to children due to a decision to withhold vaccines. The existence of an exemption should, however, prevent criminal prosecution if a child dies from a preventable disease, because a parent ...


Disclosure Of Medical Information Under Louisiana And Federal Law, David V. Snyder 2016 Indiana University School of Law - Bloomington

Disclosure Of Medical Information Under Louisiana And Federal Law, David V. Snyder

David Snyder

No abstract provided.


Daubert's Significance, Thomas G. Field Jr., Colleen M. Keegan 2016 University of New Hampshire School of Law

Daubert's Significance, Thomas G. Field Jr., Colleen M. Keegan

RISK: Health, Safety & Environment

The authors review and note the limited reach of Daubert v. Merrell Dow Pharmaceuticals. They also address its implications for concerned non-lawyers.


Physician-Assisted Suicide: The Legal And Practical Contours, Anthony J. Dangelantonio 2016 University of New Hampshire

Physician-Assisted Suicide: The Legal And Practical Contours, Anthony J. Dangelantonio

RISK: Health, Safety & Environment

This paper considers current medical and legal perspectives on patients' right to assistance in dying. In highlighting the competing policy objectives that must be resolved, it examines failed legislative initiatives in Washington and California. It also considers a pending New Hampshire proposal. The last shows the difficulty of simultaneously alleviating physician's objections and achieving proponents' goals.


Book Review, Thomas G. Field Jr. 2016 University of New Hampshire

Book Review, Thomas G. Field Jr.

RISK: Health, Safety & Environment

Review of the following: lAIN HAY, MONEY, MEDICINE AND MALPRACTICE IN AMERICAN SOCIETY. (Praeger 1992) [244 pp.] Abbreviations, annotated list of personal communications, figures, glossary, index, full legal citations, notes, preface, references, tables. LC 91-38477, ISBN 0-674-13645-4. [Cloth $49.95. P.O. Box 5007, Westwood CT 06881-9990.]


Social & Legal Perspectives On Underuse Of Medication-Assisted Treatment For Opioid Dependence, Barbara Andraka-Christou 2016 Indiana University Maurer School of Law

Social & Legal Perspectives On Underuse Of Medication-Assisted Treatment For Opioid Dependence, Barbara Andraka-Christou

Theses and Dissertations

Medication-assisted treatment (MAT) in combination with counseling is considered the most effective treatment for opioid dependence by the World Health Organization, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and American Society of Addiction Medicine. Two MAT medications, buprenorphine and methadone, are considered essential medicines by the World Health Organization. Despite MAT’s effectiveness, it is severely underused in U.S. treatment settings, including physicians’ offices, hospitals, the Veterans Administration, residential treatment centers, prisons, and drug courts. The dissertation examines social and legal reasons for under-use of MAT in the U.S., including dominance of abstinence-only treatment methods, separation of ...


Use Of Facial Recognition Technology For Medical Purposes: Balancing Privacy With Innovation, Seema Mohapatra 2016 Pepperdine University

Use Of Facial Recognition Technology For Medical Purposes: Balancing Privacy With Innovation, Seema Mohapatra

Pepperdine Law Review

Imagine applying for a job, and as part of your application process, your prospective employer asks for a photograph. You, as an eager candidate, comply with the request and, unbeknownst to you, the employer runs your picture through a software program that scans you for any common genetic diseases and that estimates your longevity. Alas, your face indicates that you may die young. No job for you. Although this sounds like science fiction, we may not be that far off from this scenario. In June 2014, scientists from Oxford reported that they have developed a facial recognition program that uses ...


Actions Speak Louder Than Images: The Use Of Neuroscientific Evidence In Criminal Cases, Stephen J. Morse 2016 University of Pennsylvania Law School

Actions Speak Louder Than Images: The Use Of Neuroscientific Evidence In Criminal Cases, Stephen J. Morse

Faculty Scholarship

This invited commentary for Journal of Law & the Biosciences considers four empirical studies previously published in the journal of the reception of neuroscientific evidence in criminal cases in the United States, Canada, England and Wales, and the Netherlands. There are conceded methodological problems with all, but the data are nonetheless instructive and suggestive. The thesis of the comment is that the courts are committing the same errors that have bedeviled the reception of psychiatric and psychological evidence. There is insufficient caution about the state of the science, and more importantly, there is insufficient understanding of the relevance of the neuroscientific ...


Decline Of Dosage Regimen Patents In Light Of Emerging Next-Generation Dna Sequencing Technology And Possible Strategic Responses, Na An 2016 University of Minnesota - Twin Cities

Decline Of Dosage Regimen Patents In Light Of Emerging Next-Generation Dna Sequencing Technology And Possible Strategic Responses, Na An

Minnesota Journal of Law, Science & Technology

No abstract provided.


Lingering Regulatory Bars To Licensing For International Medical Graduates, Therese Bart 2016 University of St. Thomas, Minnesota

Lingering Regulatory Bars To Licensing For International Medical Graduates, Therese Bart

University of St. Thomas Journal of Law and Public Policy

No abstract provided.


Pregnancy Denied, Pregnancy Rejected In Stephanie Daley, Susan Ayres, Prema Manjunath 2016 Texas A&M University School of Law

Pregnancy Denied, Pregnancy Rejected In Stephanie Daley, Susan Ayres, Prema Manjunath

Susan Ayres

This article offers a reading of Hilary Brougher’s film Stephanie Daley (2006), in which a teen is accused of murdering her newborn (neonaticide). Brougher depicts a “phenomenology of unwanted pregnancy” and an example of therapeutic jurisprudence. Part One examines Brougher’s treatment of the “shadow side of pregnancy,” and highlights barriers to the empathetic treatment of neonaticide. Part Two emphasizes the process of therapeutic jurisprudence as experienced by the two main characters. Brougher’s film provides a social narrative and phenomenology that may influence laws and legal responses and enlarge social understanding of unwanted pregnancy.


The Negative Effects Of Cumulative Abortion Regulations: Why The 5th Circuit Was Wrong In Upholding Regulations On Medication Abortions (Planned Parenthood Of Greater Texas Surgical Health Services V. Abbott), Benjamin A. Hooper 2016 University of Cincinnati Law Review

The Negative Effects Of Cumulative Abortion Regulations: Why The 5th Circuit Was Wrong In Upholding Regulations On Medication Abortions (Planned Parenthood Of Greater Texas Surgical Health Services V. Abbott), Benjamin A. Hooper

University of Cincinnati Law Review

No abstract provided.


Rights Gone Wrong: A Case Against Wrongful Life, W. Ryan Schuster 2016 College of William & Mary Law School

Rights Gone Wrong: A Case Against Wrongful Life, W. Ryan Schuster

William & Mary Law Review

No abstract provided.


Children’S Anatomy V. Children’S Autonomy: A Precarious Balancing Act With Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis And The Creation Of “Savior Siblings”, Marley McClean 2016 Pepperdine University

Children’S Anatomy V. Children’S Autonomy: A Precarious Balancing Act With Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis And The Creation Of “Savior Siblings”, Marley Mcclean

Pepperdine Law Review

On February 3, 2015, Members of the United Kingdom’s Parliament, in an historical move, voted to approve the creation of human beings from three different parents, i.e., the creation of three-person DNA. In doing so, it became the first country ever to approve laws regulating such a procedure. The procedure uses a customized version of in vitro fertilization (IVF) to mix the DNA of two parents with the healthy mitochondria of a donor woman. While three-person DNA is not yet practiced in the United States, there is a controversial ART procedure practiced and unregulated in the United States ...


Law And The Sciences Of The Brain/Mind, Stephen J. Morse 2016 University of Pennsylvania Law School

Law And The Sciences Of The Brain/Mind, Stephen J. Morse

Faculty Scholarship

This chapter is a submission to the Oxford Handbook of Law and the Regulation of Technology edited by Roger Brownsword. It considers whether the new sciences of the brain/mind, especially neuroscience and behavioral genetics, are likely to transform the law’s traditional concepts of the person, agency and responsibility. The chapter begins with a brief speculation about why so many people think these sciences will transform the law. After reviewing the law’s concepts, misguided challenges to them, and the achievements of the new sciences, the chapter confronts the claim that these sciences prove that we are really not ...


The Treatment For Malpractice – Physician, Enhance Thyself: The Impact Of Neuroenhancements For Medical Malpractice, Harvey L. Fiser 2016 Else School of Management, Milsaps College

The Treatment For Malpractice – Physician, Enhance Thyself: The Impact Of Neuroenhancements For Medical Malpractice, Harvey L. Fiser

Pace Law Review

This article will introduce some of the issues and offer some possible guidelines which may eventually guide cases of medical malpractice and medical care in the face of neurointerventions. First, I will briefly address the standard of care in medical malpractice cases in general. Second, I will discuss some of the existing and potential physical and neurological enhancements available for physicians. Finally, I will explore how these neurointerventions could alter the standards for medical malpractice for both the enhanced doctors and the entire medical profession.


The Contours Of The Parallel Claim Exception: The Supreme Court's Opportunity To Define The Ill-Defined, Jarret Sena 2016 Fordham University School of Law

The Contours Of The Parallel Claim Exception: The Supreme Court's Opportunity To Define The Ill-Defined, Jarret Sena

Fordham Urban Law Journal

No abstract provided.


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