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Feigned Consensus: Usurping The Law In Shaken Baby Syndrome/Abusive Head Trauma Prosecutions, Keith A. Findley, D. Michael Risinger, Patrick D. Barnes, Julie A. Mack, David A. Moran, Barry C. Scheck, Thomas L. Bohan 2020 University of Wisconsin Law School

Feigned Consensus: Usurping The Law In Shaken Baby Syndrome/Abusive Head Trauma Prosecutions, Keith A. Findley, D. Michael Risinger, Patrick D. Barnes, Julie A. Mack, David A. Moran, Barry C. Scheck, Thomas L. Bohan

Articles

Few medico-legal matters have generated as much controversy--both in the medical literature and in the courtroom--as Shaken Baby Syndrome (SBS), now known more broadly as Abusive Head Trauma (AHT). The controversies are of enormous significance in the law because child abuse pediatricians claim, on the basis of a few non-specific medical findings supported by a weak and methodologically flawed research base, to be able to “diagnose” child abuse, and thereby to provide all of the evidence necessary to satisfy all of the legal elements for criminal prosecution (or removal of children from their parents). It is a matter, therefore, in ...


Healthcare Licensing And Liability, Benjamin McMichael 2020 University of Alabama School of Law

Healthcare Licensing And Liability, Benjamin Mcmichael

Indiana Law Journal

The United States’ affordable care crisis and chronic physician shortage have

required advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) and physician assistants

(PAs) to assume increasingly important roles in the healthcare system. The increased

use of these nonphysician providers has improved access to healthcare and lowered

the price of care. However, restrictive occupational licensing laws—specifically,

scope-of-practice laws—have limited their ability to care for patients. While these

laws, by themselves, have important implications for the healthcare system, they also

interact with other legal regimes to impact the provision of care. Restrictive scopeof-

practice laws can increase the malpractice liability risk of ...


Fraud Or Confusion: A Pill For Chronic Securities Litigation In The Life Sciences Sector, Eric Schmid 2020 Boston College Law School

Fraud Or Confusion: A Pill For Chronic Securities Litigation In The Life Sciences Sector, Eric Schmid

Boston College Law Review

Publicly traded life science companies must navigate two overlapping regulatory agencies with distinct disclosure policies. The Food & Drug Administration (FDA) has a policy of under-disclosure to incentivize drug development while the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) encourages over-disclosure to avoid securities fraud. The FDA’s far-reaching and complex regulations, coupled with its acquiescence to confidentiality, obfuscates a life science company’s obligations under SEC regulation; as a result, life science companies are an attractive target for securities litigation. This Note explores the interplay between FDA and SEC regulations to pinpoint the source of the disproportionately high rate of securities litigation. It identifies two possible causes, one calling for drastic reforms and the other requiring a modest solution in comparison. It subsequently recommends the FDA release broad guidance on good disclosure practices in an attempt to reduce litigation for life science companies before more radical reforms are required.


Law School News: Rwu Law Professors Win Release For Two Immigrants At Risk For Covid-19 04-24-2020, Roger Williams University School of Law 2020 Roger Williams University

Law School News: Rwu Law Professors Win Release For Two Immigrants At Risk For Covid-19 04-24-2020, Roger Williams University School Of Law

Life of the Law School (1993- )

No abstract provided.


Strategic Apologies In Medical Malpractice Mediation, Brittany Norman 2020 Pepperdine University

Strategic Apologies In Medical Malpractice Mediation, Brittany Norman

Pepperdine Dispute Resolution Law Journal

Mistakes happen, even in a field as serious and careful as medicine. As a result, some patients are left with unexpected results from their medical procedures. Once hospitals inform patients of medical mistakes or the patients inform the hospital, the patients' cases are moved to the legal realm, where they are viewed as a liability. This shift causes the patient to feel as though the hospital does not recognize him or her and prevents doctors from apologizing to their patients, despite their desire to do so. In an attempt to apologize without vulnerability to liability, medical professionals are sometimes instructed ...


Euthanasia Of The Coronavirus - Covid-19, Sheila P. Davis 2020 The University of Southern Mississippi

Euthanasia Of The Coronavirus - Covid-19, Sheila P. Davis

Online Journal of Health Ethics

At the time of this editorial, COVID-19, aka the Novel Coronavirus, has wrecked havoc and left in its path of destruction, death, unemployment, the instability of nation’s economies, misery, uncertainty, despair, and a fear regarding what the new tomorrow will look like. And, perhaps more importantly, the question of who will be here tomorrow lingers. Now classified as a pandemic, this virus has resulted in over 1,381,014 cases worldwide with 78,269 deaths to date. Presently, Louisiana and Detroit are emerging as the next hot spots behind New York as the fastest rate of increase for COVID-19 ...


Cummings V. Barber, 136 Nev. Adv. Op. 18 (April 2, 2020), Alexis Taitel 2020 University of Nevada, Las Vegas -- William S. Boyd School of Law

Cummings V. Barber, 136 Nev. Adv. Op. 18 (April 2, 2020), Alexis Taitel

Nevada Supreme Court Summaries

No abstract provided.


The Baker Act: Time For Florida To Get Its Act Together, Alexander Lemieux 2020 Barry University School of Law

The Baker Act: Time For Florida To Get Its Act Together, Alexander Lemieux

Child and Family Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Fertility Fraud And Proposal For Florida Legislation, Cheyenne Dunn 2020 Barry University School of Law

Fertility Fraud And Proposal For Florida Legislation, Cheyenne Dunn

Child and Family Law Journal

No abstract provided.


(Almost) No Bad Drugs: Near-Total Products Liability Immunity For Pharmaceuticals Explained, Anita Bernstein 2020 Brooklyn Law School

(Almost) No Bad Drugs: Near-Total Products Liability Immunity For Pharmaceuticals Explained, Anita Bernstein

Washington and Lee Law Review

This Article explores four beliefs about supposed pharma-benevolence that appear to be shared by more than the industry, reaching the level almost of conventional wisdom. These figurative pillars help support one-sided results in court. However, each of the pillars on examination turns out at least a bit shaky. This Article puts them forward for review to start a necessary discussion.

The locus of this Article is products liability, where a court concludes that a manufactured object is defective or could be called defective by a factfinder following a trial. Drug manufacturers enjoy near-immunity from this consequence. Modern products liability identifies ...


Amending The Ryan Haight Act: Elevating Telemedicine Law To New Heights, Dillon Vaughn 2020 Texas A&M University School of Law (Student)

Amending The Ryan Haight Act: Elevating Telemedicine Law To New Heights, Dillon Vaughn

Texas A&M Law Review

The Ryan Haight Act has established excessive restrictions on controlled substance prescribing through telemedicine by first requiring an in-person exam. If the Act is not amended, many individuals in need of medication will go without proper medical care. While other agencies and states have made moves to expand telehealth, the DEA has dragged its feet on making any significant changes. This Comment argues that the federal government should amend the Ryan Haight Act, allowing telemedicine providers to prescribe controlled substances without an in-person exam. This amendment would focus on the standard of care while requiring stringent documentation by physicians who ...


The Captive Lab Rat: Human Medical Experimentation In The Carceral State, Laura I. Appleman 2020 Willamette University

The Captive Lab Rat: Human Medical Experimentation In The Carceral State, Laura I. Appleman

Boston College Law Review

Human medical experimentation upon captive, vulnerable subjects is not a relic of our American past. It is part of our present. The extensive history of medical experimentation on the disabled, the poor, the mentally ill, and the incarcerated has been little explored. Its continuance has been even less discussed, especially in the legal literature. The standard narrative of human medical experimentation ends abruptly in the 1970s, with the uncovering of the Tuskegee syphilis study. My research shows, however, that this narrative is incorrect and incomplete. The practice of experimenting on the captive and vulnerable persists. Our current approach to human ...


The Importance Of Doctor Liability In Medical Malpractice Law: China Versus The United States, Vincent R. Johnson 2020 St. Mary's University School of Law

The Importance Of Doctor Liability In Medical Malpractice Law: China Versus The United States, Vincent R. Johnson

St. Mary's Journal on Legal Malpractice & Ethics

Medical malpractice law in China does not work. Disappointed patients and their families, or the gangs they hire, frequently resort to physical violence, beating up doctors and disrupting hospital activities in order to extort settlements. This happens because Chinese law has failed to provide viable remedies to many victims of medical malpractice.

This dysfunctional situation (medical chaos or yinao) has persisted for more than two decades. Today, parents in China discourage their children from attending medical school because practicing medicine is too dangerous.

Reforming Chinese medical malpractice law will be difficult. Many factors contribute to the public’s lack of ...


Under Kemp’S Eye: Analyzing The Constitutionality Of The Heartbeat Restriction In Georgia’S Life Act And Its Potential Impact On Abortion Law, Brittney A. Sizemore 2020 Mercer University School of Law

Under Kemp’S Eye: Analyzing The Constitutionality Of The Heartbeat Restriction In Georgia’S Life Act And Its Potential Impact On Abortion Law, Brittney A. Sizemore

Mercer Law Review

The current state of women’s right to bodily autonomy in the United States has eerily begun to resemble that of the dystopian society depicted in The Handmaid’s Tale. While abortion rates have steadily declined over the last decade, the attempts by state legislatures to restrict or completely take away women’s right to abortion have exponentially increased. In the first six months of 2019 alone, five states passed laws placing restrictions on abortion. These restrictions range from limiting the time frame in which a woman may obtain an abortion to when a fetal heartbeat has been detected—normally ...


Competency To Decide For Another, Elyn R. Saks 2020 Case Western Reserve University School of Law

Competency To Decide For Another, Elyn R. Saks

Health Matrix: The Journal of Law-Medicine

Our topic is competency of a Substitute Decisionmaker (SubDM) to make a decision about medical treatment for another who is incompetent himself (the “ward”). While there is Competency to Decide for Another considerable literature on competency to decide for oneself, there is very little on competency to decide for another. Some studies look at a range of things that a SubDM needs to do —for example, seek information on what the ward has said—but there is none on how well a person must understand the relevant issues to be a competent SubDM.


Of Mosquitoes And "Moral Convictions" In The Age Of Zika: How The Trump Administration's Gutting Of The Affordable Care Act's Contraceptive Mandate Jeopardizes Women's And Children's Health, Linda C. Fentiman 2020 Case Western Reserve University School of Law

Of Mosquitoes And "Moral Convictions" In The Age Of Zika: How The Trump Administration's Gutting Of The Affordable Care Act's Contraceptive Mandate Jeopardizes Women's And Children's Health, Linda C. Fentiman

Health Matrix: The Journal of Law-Medicine

The Trump Administration’s efforts to undo the contraceptive mandate, a key component of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), threaten a major public health emergency, as well as the rule of law and separation of powers. The Trump Administration’s Rules greatly expand the grounds for exemption from the contraceptive mandate: they allow even publicly traded corporations to assert religious beliefs as a ground for exemption and exempt all employers except publicly traded corporations from compliance with the contraceptive mandate if they hold “moral convictions” in opposition to contraception. By denying women access to effective, affordable contraception, these Rules increase ...


The Off-Label Loophole In The Psychopharmacologic Setting: Prescription Of Antipsychotic Drugs In The Nonpsychotic Patient Population, Lisa E. Smilan 2020 Case Western Reserve University School of Law

The Off-Label Loophole In The Psychopharmacologic Setting: Prescription Of Antipsychotic Drugs In The Nonpsychotic Patient Population, Lisa E. Smilan

Health Matrix: The Journal of Law-Medicine

U.S. physicians have wide discretion in treating patients with off-label medications. Many consider off-label prescription essential in our country’s health care system, and it is wholly supported by FDA and federal courts. Assumptions about physicians’ expertise, judgments, and commitments to beneficence and nonmaleficence undergird laissez-faire policies that allow and support physicians’ novel and innovate uses of FDA-approved drugs for purposes and populations not studied in original, strictly regulated clinical trials. Though sometimes beneficial, off-label prescribing, which flourishes in privatepractice psychiatry, often harms scores of psychiatric patients. Frequently, potential harms are insufficiently disclosed to patients. In the public health ...


The Paradoxes Of Defensive Medicine, Michael J. Saks, Stephan Landsman 2020 Case Western Reserve University School of Law

The Paradoxes Of Defensive Medicine, Michael J. Saks, Stephan Landsman

Health Matrix: The Journal of Law-Medicine

For decades, “defensive medicine” has been the leading argument driving reforms of medical malpractice laws throughout the United States. Defensive medicine is the presumed practice of administering excessive tests and treatments as a stratagem for reducing healthcare providers’ risk of malpractice liability, despite the absence of any expected benefit for the patient. The practice is widely believed to exist throughout American healthcare as a response to fears of malpractice litigation, and thought to be enormously wasteful of healthcare dollars. In consequence, it has become a justification for law reforms insulating the healthcare industry from tort liability. These claims are promoted ...


The Promise And Failures Of Children's Medicaid And The Role Of Medical-Legal Partnerships As Monitors And Advocates, L. Kate Mitchell 2020 Case Western Reserve University School of Law

The Promise And Failures Of Children's Medicaid And The Role Of Medical-Legal Partnerships As Monitors And Advocates, L. Kate Mitchell

Health Matrix: The Journal of Law-Medicine

For decades we have known that access to early and preventive diagnosis and treatment can dramatically alter the course of a child’s life. Because of this knowledge, immediately after Congress enacted Medicaid, it created the Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnostic and Treatment, or EPSDT, program. EPSDT requires broad, holistic, and preventive care to correct or ameliorate health defects identified in Medicaid-eligible children. This coverage currently extends to 2 out of 5 children in the United States, and 47 percent of children with special health care needs. Because of the broad parameters of coverage mandated by EPSDT, Medicaid-eligible children should ...


Medical Aid In Dying By Telehealth, Konstantin Tretyakov 2020 Case Western Reserve University School of Law

Medical Aid In Dying By Telehealth, Konstantin Tretyakov

Health Matrix: The Journal of Law-Medicine

Medical aid in dying is a form of medical treatment recognized in several states and the District of Columbia and available to adult residents of those states who are competent and suffer from a terminal disease. Timely access to it is critical for qualifying patients. The article explores the possibility of facilitating access to medical aid in dying via telehealth—a method of providing health care remotely by means of electronic communication. Specifically, I analyze the feasibility of medical aid in dying by telehealth from clinical and legal perspectives. I also examine a relevant normative issue of the nature of ...


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