Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Constitutional Law Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

20558 Full-Text Articles 10168 Authors 6739231 Downloads 167 Institutions

All Articles in Constitutional Law

Faceted Search

20558 full-text articles. Page 1 of 476.

Recent Applications Of The Supreme Court's Hands-Off Approach To Religious Doctrine: From Hosanna-Tabor And Holt To Hobby Lobby And Zubik, Samuel J. Levine 2017 Touro Law Center

Recent Applications Of The Supreme Court's Hands-Off Approach To Religious Doctrine: From Hosanna-Tabor And Holt To Hobby Lobby And Zubik, Samuel J. Levine

Scholarly Works

In each of the past four terms, the United States Supreme Court has decided a case with important implications for the interpretation and application of the Religion Clauses of the United States Constitution: Hosanna-Tabor Evangelical Lutheran Church & Sch. v. EEOC, Burwell v. Hobby Lobby, Inc., Holt v. Hobbs, and, most recently, Zubik v. Burwell. Although the Court’s decisions in these cases addressed—and seemed to resolve—a number of questions central to Free Exercise and Establishment Clause jurisprudence, including recognition of the “ministerial exception” and religious rights of a corporate entity, the decisions left a number of questions unanswered ...


A Missed Opportunity To Clarify Students' First Amendment Rights In The Digital Age, Elizabeth Shaver 2017 The University of Akron

A Missed Opportunity To Clarify Students' First Amendment Rights In The Digital Age, Elizabeth Shaver

Akron Law Publications

In the last decade, the federal circuit courts have grappled with the issue whether, and to what extent, school officials constitutionally may discipline students for their off-campus electronic speech. Before 2015, three federal circuit courts had extended school authority to off-campus electronic speech by applying a vague test that allows school officials to reach far beyond the iconic “schoolhouse gate” referenced in the Supreme Court’s landmark decision in Tinker v. Des Moines Independent Community School District, 393 U.S. 503 (1969) Two other federal circuits had avoided the issue altogether by deciding the cases before them on other grounds ...


Reciprocal Legitimation In The Federal Courts System: Racial Segregation, Reapportionment, And Obergefell Appendix A, Neil S. Siegel 2017 Duke Law School

Reciprocal Legitimation In The Federal Courts System: Racial Segregation, Reapportionment, And Obergefell Appendix A, Neil S. Siegel

Faculty Scholarship

Much scholarship in law and political science has long understood the U.S. Supreme Court to be the “apex” court in the federal judicial system, and so to relate hierarchically to “lower” federal courts. On that top-down view, exemplified by the work of Alexander Bickel and many subsequent scholars, the Court is the principal, and lower federal courts are its faithful agents. Other scholarship takes a bottom-up approach, viewing lower federal courts as faithless agents or analyzing the “percolation” of issues in those courts before the Court decides. This Article identifies circumstances in which the relationship between the Court and ...


Secession And Federalism In The United States: Tools For Managing Regional Conflict In A Pluralist Society, Erin Ryan 2016 Florida State University

Secession And Federalism In The United States: Tools For Managing Regional Conflict In A Pluralist Society, Erin Ryan

Erin Ryan

This volume, incorporating the work of scholars from various parts of the globe, taps the wisdom of the Westphalian (and post-Westphalian) world on the use of federalism and secession as tools for managing regional conflict.  The conversation has scarcely been more important than it is right now, especially in light of recent events in Catalonia, Scotland, Québec, and the Sudan—all unique political contexts raising similar questions about how best to balance competing claims for autonomy, interdependence, political voice, and exit.  Exploring how various nations have encountered like conflicts, some more and some less successfully, promises to broaden the perspectives ...


Construction, Originalist Interpretation And The Complete Constitution, Richard Kay 2016 Selected Works

Construction, Originalist Interpretation And The Complete Constitution, Richard Kay

Richard Kay

 In recent years, the literature of constitutional originalism has adopted a new concept, “constitutional construction.” This Essay critically examines that concept. Contrary to some claims, the difference between “interpretation” and “construction” is not well established in common law adjudication. Furthermore, contemporary descriptions of constitutional construction tend to leave some ill-defined discretion in the hands of constitutional decision-makers. Finally, the Essay disputes the claim that constitutional construction is indispensable because the constitutional text is incomplete, that failing to provide a decision-rule for many—indeed for most—constitutional disputes. The Constitution would indeed be incomplete if interpreted according to the “new” or ...


Forfeitures And The Eighth Amendment: A Practical Approach To The Excessive Fines Clause As A Check On Government Seizures, David Pimentel 2016 University of Idaho College of Law

Forfeitures And The Eighth Amendment: A Practical Approach To The Excessive Fines Clause As A Check On Government Seizures, David Pimentel

David Pimentel

Civil forfeiture procedure, notwithstanding reform-oriented legislation in 2000, continues to generate controversy, as it permits law enforcement to seize assets based on alleged or suspected wrongdoing, without adequate protection for property owners. The Supreme Court has consistently upheld them against due process challenges, but in 1998 acknowledged that forfeitures may violate the Excessive Fines Clause of the Eighth Amendment. The test proposed in that case, U.S. v. Bajakajian, was drawn from the Cruel and Unusual Punishment Clause: that a forfeiture violates the Eighth Amendment if it is “grossly disproportional” to the gravity of the offense. This test has been ...


Abortion, Informed Consent And Regulatory Spillover, Alex Stein, Katherine Shaw 2016 Cardozo Law School

Abortion, Informed Consent And Regulatory Spillover, Alex Stein, Katherine Shaw

Alex Stein

The constitutional law of abortion stands on the untenable assumption that any state’s abortion regulations impact citizens of that state alone. On this understanding, the state’s boundaries demarcate the terrain on which women’s right to abortion clashes with state power to regulate that right.
 
This Article uncovers a previously unnoticed horizontal dimension of abortion regulation: the medical-malpractice penalties imposed upon doctors for failing to inform patients about abortion risks; the states’ power to define those risks, along with doctors’ informed-consent obligations and penalties; and, critically, the possibility that such standards might cross state lines. Planned Parenthood v ...


The Dual Meaning Of Evidence-Based Judicial Review Of Legislation, Ittai Bar-Siman-Tov 2016 Bar-Ilan University

The Dual Meaning Of Evidence-Based Judicial Review Of Legislation, Ittai Bar-Siman-Tov

Dr. Ittai Bar-Siman-Tov

This article contributes to the nascent debate about the globally emerging, yet largely undefined, phenomenon of evidence-based judicial review of legislation, by offering a novel conceptualization of evidence-based judicial review.

It argues that evidence-based judicial review can have two related, but very different, meanings: one in which the judicial decision determining constitutionality of legislation is a product of independent judicial evidence-based decision-making; and the other in which the judicial decision on constitutionality of legislation focuses on evidence about the question of whether the legislation was a product of legislative evidence-based decision-making. 

The article then employs this novel insight about the ...


Demonetisation_ A Constitutional Law Expert Explains Why The Narendra Modi Government Can't Stop Indians From Accessing Their Money — Quartz.Pdf, Shubhankar Dam 2016 SMU School of Law

Demonetisation_ A Constitutional Law Expert Explains Why The Narendra Modi Government Can't Stop Indians From Accessing Their Money — Quartz.Pdf, Shubhankar Dam

Shubhankar Dam

In the late hours of November 8, Prime Minister Narendra Modi plunged India into an economic unknown. He unveiled a monetary experiment without historical parallels. Overnight, 86 percent of all Indian currency notes became illegal tender. The million haggles, motley exchanges and many handshakes that motor India’s economy screeched to a halt. Cash disappeared.
 
The demonitisation move came with strict limits on cash withdrawals. Banked citizens abruptly had their accounts restricted. Income, lawfully earned, taxed, and deposited, was fenced out of reach. Individuals, for now, are limited to rupees 24,000 (USD 350) a week, and businesses, big and ...


“Time Works Changes”: Modernizing Fourth Amendment Law To Protect Cell Site Location Information, Alexander Porter 2016 Boston College Law School

“Time Works Changes”: Modernizing Fourth Amendment Law To Protect Cell Site Location Information, Alexander Porter

Boston College Law Review

In 2012, federal juries convicted two men of armed robbery based in part on historical cell site location information (“CSLI”) evidence. Historical CSLI can reproduce a person’s location with great specificity. Cell phone users generate CSLI automatically by operating their cellular phones. These facts raise serious privacy concerns. This Note argues that Congress must take action to ensure that law enforcement agents can access a suspect’s historical CSLI only after a neutral magistrate finds probable cause that a crime has been committed. Further, this Note argues that because cell phone users do not voluntarily convey CSLI to their ...


Free Speech & Disparaging Trademarks, Ned Snow 2016 University of South Carolina School of Law

Free Speech & Disparaging Trademarks, Ned Snow

Boston College Law Review

Speech law has silenced trademark. In In re Tam, the Federal Circuit ruled that the First Amendment requires Congress to grant trademark protection for disparaging speech. More specifically, the Federal Circuit held unconstitutional the provision of the Federal Lanham Act that denies trademark protection for marks that disparage. The Federal Circuit’s ruling, however, is not the final word on the issue. The Supreme Court has agreed to hear the Tam case. This Article argues against the Federal Circuit decision. As illustrated by the five different opinions from the en banc panel, the complexities of speech law easily lead to ...


Nickel And Dimed Into Incarceration: Cash Register Justice In The Criminal System, Laura I Appleman 2016 Willamette University College of Law

Nickel And Dimed Into Incarceration: Cash Register Justice In The Criminal System, Laura I Appleman

Boston College Law Review

Criminal justice debt has aggressively metastasized throughout the criminal system. A bewildering array of fees, fines, court costs, non-payment penalties, and high interest rates have turned criminal process into a booming revenue center for state courts and corrections. As criminal justice “administrative” costs have skyrocketed, the burden to fund the system has fallen largely on the system’s users—primarily poor or indigent—who often cannot pay their burden. Unpaid criminal justice debt often leads to actual incarceration or substantial punitive fines, which turns rapidly into “punishment”. Such punishment at the hands of a court, bureaucracy, or private entity compromises ...


Where Do Justice Ginsburg And Justice Hale—And Judicial Independence—Go From Here?, Brian Christopher Jones 2016 Liverpool Hope University, UK

Where Do Justice Ginsburg And Justice Hale—And Judicial Independence—Go From Here?, Brian Christopher Jones

Brian Christopher Jones

No abstract provided.


The Choice Between Right And Easy: Pena-Rodriguez V. Colorado And The Necessity Of A Racial Bias Exception To Rule 606(B), Kevin Zhao 2016 Duke Law

The Choice Between Right And Easy: Pena-Rodriguez V. Colorado And The Necessity Of A Racial Bias Exception To Rule 606(B), Kevin Zhao

Duke Journal of Constitutional Law & Public Policy Sidebar

Traditionally, under Rule 606(b) of the Federal Rules of Evidence, jurors are barred from testifying towards matters within juror deliberations. However, many jurisdictions in the United States have adopted an exception to this rule for racial prejudice. That is, if a juror comes forward post-verdict to testify that another juror made racially charged comments within the jury room, then the verdict may be overturned. The Supreme Court will address this issue in its upcoming decision in Pena-Rodriguez v. Colorado. This commentary will argue that a racial bias exception is necessary to protect defendants' rights to a fair trial and ...


Rethinking Article 422: A Retrospective On Ecuador's 2008 Constitutional Isds Recalibration, Alexander B. Avtgis 2016 Indiana University Maurer School of Law

Rethinking Article 422: A Retrospective On Ecuador's 2008 Constitutional Isds Recalibration, Alexander B. Avtgis

Indiana Journal of Constitutional Design

Is Ecuador’s adoption of Article 422 in the 2008 Constitution properly viewed as a “re-statification”1 of Investor State Dispute Settlement (ISDS)? And, since its implementation, has the constitutional article been effective in institutionally insulating Ecuador from the jurisdictional reach of international ISDS? This paper answers both questions in the negative—but qualifies such an outlook by balancing the drawbacks of Article 422 against its successes. Article 422’s provisions, strident in its attempt to create an alternative development vision, did not achieve all that the Constitution’s drafters had hoped. Nevertheless, in its limited effect of detaching Ecuador ...


Brief Of Appellant, Davon Jones V. State Of Maryland, No. 547, Paul DeWolfe, Renée M. Hutchins, Matthew T. Healy 2016 University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law

Brief Of Appellant, Davon Jones V. State Of Maryland, No. 547, Paul Dewolfe, Renée M. Hutchins, Matthew T. Healy

Court Briefs

No abstract provided.


Further Punishing The Wrongfully Accused: Manuel V. City Of Joliet, The Fourth Amendment, And Malicious Prosecution, James R. Holley 2016 Duke Law

Further Punishing The Wrongfully Accused: Manuel V. City Of Joliet, The Fourth Amendment, And Malicious Prosecution, James R. Holley

Duke Journal of Constitutional Law & Public Policy Sidebar

Manuel v. City of Joliet is before the Supreme Court to determine whether detention before trial without probable cause is a violation of the Fourth Amendment, or whether it is merely a violation of the Due Process Clause. Every circuit except the Seventh Circuit treats this type of detention as being a violation of the Fourth Amendment; only the Seventh Circuit considers this question under the Due Process Clause. This commentary argues that the Supreme Court should look to its precedent, which clearly treats pretrial detention without probable cause as being a Fourth Amendment issue, and reverse the Seventh Circuit ...


Ulysses: A Mighty Hero In The Fight For Freedom Of Expression, Marc J. Randazza 2016 University of Massachusetts School of Law

Ulysses: A Mighty Hero In The Fight For Freedom Of Expression, Marc J. Randazza

University of Massachusetts Law Review

James Joyce’s Ulysses was a revolutionary novel, and this much is common knowledge. What is not common knowledge is how useful Ulysses was in pushing the boundaries of freedom of expression. This masterpiece of literature opened the door for modern American free speech jurisprudence, but in recent years has become more of an object of judicial scorn. This Article seeks to educate legal scholars as to the importance of the novel, and attempts to reverse the anti-intellectual spirit that runs through modern American jurisprudence, where the novel is now more used as an object of mockery, or as a ...


Legal Scholarship Highlight: The Amicus Machine, Allison Orr Larsen, Neal Devins 2016 William & Mary Law School

Legal Scholarship Highlight: The Amicus Machine, Allison Orr Larsen, Neal Devins

Popular Media

No abstract provided.


Reclaiming Equality To Reframe Indigent Defense Reform, Lauren Sudeall Lucas 2016 Georgia State University College of Law

Reclaiming Equality To Reframe Indigent Defense Reform, Lauren Sudeall Lucas

Lauren Sudeall Lucas

Equal access to resources is fundamental to meaningful legal representation, yet for decades, equality arguments have been ignored in litigating indigent defense reform. At a time when underfunded indigent defense systems across the country are failing to provide indigent defendants with adequate representation, the question of resources is even more critical. Traditionally, advocates seeking indigent defense reform have relied on Sixth Amendment arguments to protect the rights of indigents in this context; however, the Sixth Amendment approach suffers from a number of shortcomings that have made it a poor tool for systemic reform, including its exclusive focus on attorney performance ...


Digital Commons powered by bepress