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“Second Looks, Second Chances”: Collaborating With Lifers On A Video About Commutation Of Lwop Sentences, Regina Austin 2018 University of Pennsylvania Law School

“Second Looks, Second Chances”: Collaborating With Lifers On A Video About Commutation Of Lwop Sentences, Regina Austin

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

In Pennsylvania, life means life without the possibility of parole (“LWOP”) or “death by incarceration.” Although executive commutation offers long serving rehabilitated lifers hope of release, in the past 20 years, only 8 commutations have been granted by the state’s governors. This article describes the collaboration between an organization of incarcerated persons serving LWOP and the law-school-based Penn Program on Documentaries and the Law that produced a video supporting increased commutations for Pennsylvania lifers. The article details the methodology of collaborative videomaking employed, the strategic decisions over content that were impacted by the politics of commutation, and the contributions ...


Special Problems For Prosecutors In Public Corruption Prosecutions, Mimi Rocah, Carrie Cohen, Steve Cohen, Daniel Cort, Bennett L. Gershman 2018 Elisabeth Haub School of Law at Pace University

Special Problems For Prosecutors In Public Corruption Prosecutions, Mimi Rocah, Carrie Cohen, Steve Cohen, Daniel Cort, Bennett L. Gershman

Pace Law Review

The focus of this panel is not so much on the academic part of McDonnell, the case law. Of course, you’ll hear the name McDonnell and we’ll talk about that.

But we’re trying to talk a little more broadly about public corruption prosecutions in general. Some of these are unique issues. You heard a little bit about them from the former people who have done them, what special unique problems are involved in them and challenges the prosecutors face and what effect, if any.


How Should Congress Respond To Mcdonnell?, David Yassky, Kathleen Clark, Allen Dickerson, Jennifer Rodgers 2018 Elisabeth Haub School of Law at Pace University

How Should Congress Respond To Mcdonnell?, David Yassky, Kathleen Clark, Allen Dickerson, Jennifer Rodgers

Pace Law Review

Discussion of question of whether McDonnell was essentially right or wrong. Should Congress act to change the McDonnell rule? Should the Supreme Court reconsider it? What would be an alternative or a better way, if there is one, to approach the question of public corruption prosecution?


How Has Mcdonnell Affected Prosecutors’ Ability To Police Public Corruption? What Are Politicians And Lobbyists Allowed To Do, And What Are Prosecutors Able To Prosecute?, Vincent L. Briccetti, Amie Ely, Alexandra Shapiro, Dan Stein 2018 U.S. District Court, Southern District of New York

How Has Mcdonnell Affected Prosecutors’ Ability To Police Public Corruption? What Are Politicians And Lobbyists Allowed To Do, And What Are Prosecutors Able To Prosecute?, Vincent L. Briccetti, Amie Ely, Alexandra Shapiro, Dan Stein

Pace Law Review

The question posed to the panelists on the first panel is: How has McDonnell affected prosecutors’ ability to police public corruption? What can politicians and lobbyists do and what can prosecutors prosecute?


Primer, Samantha Conway, David Diab, Amanda Fiorilla, Eric Grossfeld 2018 Elisabeth Haub School of Law at Pace University

Primer, Samantha Conway, David Diab, Amanda Fiorilla, Eric Grossfeld

Pace Law Review

Discussion and history of public corruption statutes and the prosecution of public officials through McDonnell v. United States, 136 S. Ct. 2355 (2016).


Introduction, Mimi Rocah 2018 Elisabeth Haub School of Law at Pace University

Introduction, Mimi Rocah

Pace Law Review

On March 9, 2018, the Elisabeth Haub School of Law at Pace University hosted Public Corruption Prosecution After McDonnell, a symposium that brought together law enforcement, practitioners, academics and media that covers these cases to gain insight and input from these disparate groups. The Symposium convened three panels to discuss how McDonnell has affected prosecutors’ ability to police public corruption; to offer legislative responses to McDonnell; and to examine the inherently unique nature of public corruption prosecutions. A central aim of the day-long event was to simultaneously tackle these challenging issues while distilling complex legal analysis in a manner suitable ...


Law By Non-Lawyers: The Limit To Limited License Legal Technicians Increasing Access To Justice, Rebecca M. Donaldson 2018 Seattle University School of Law

Law By Non-Lawyers: The Limit To Limited License Legal Technicians Increasing Access To Justice, Rebecca M. Donaldson

Seattle University Law Review

For the first time in the American legal profession, non-lawyers can openly, independently, ethically, and legally engage in activities recognized by bar associations as the practice of law. In 2012, the Washington Supreme Court passed Admission and Practice Rule 28 (APR 28), establishing the profession’s first paraprofessional licensing scheme that allows non-lawyers to give legal advice. The process authorizes qualified non-lawyers to provide legal advice without the supervision of a lawyer. Washington’s Supreme Court intends for Limited License Legal Technicians, or “LLLTs” as they are known, to increase access to justice by responding to the unmet civil legal ...


Quality In Open Access: Flashing Lights And Fairy Tales, Amanda Page 2018 Syracuse University

Quality In Open Access: Flashing Lights And Fairy Tales, Amanda Page

Libraries' and Librarians' Publications

Presentation given as invited panelist at Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT) for the 21st Century Scholarship Unlocked; Selecting and Accessing Publishers Symposium


Are Boycotts, Shunning, And Shaming Corrupt?, Scott Altman 2018 BLR

Are Boycotts, Shunning, And Shaming Corrupt?, Scott Altman

University of Southern California Legal Studies Working Paper Series

This article argues that boycotts, shunning, and shaming are sometimes corrupt because they create incentives that undermine important individual aims, enticing people into acting for inappropriate reasons. They harm targets by undermining belief formation, or by impeding efforts at living authentically, deterring targets from declaring their beliefs in public or from pursuing projects that they believe important. They are corrupt because they make their targets willing participants in undermining their own aims, subverting their individual ambitions not to allow money or social pressure to influence their beliefs and their most important actions. Although individuals must sometimes take responsibility for maintaining ...


Digging Them Out Alive, Michael Millemann, Rebecca Bowman Rivas, Elizabeth Smith 2018 University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law

Digging Them Out Alive, Michael Millemann, Rebecca Bowman Rivas, Elizabeth Smith

Faculty Scholarship

From 2013-2018, we taught a collection of interrelated law and social work clinical courses, which we call “the Unger clinic.” This clinic was part of a major, multi-year criminal justice project, led by the Maryland Office of the Public Defender. The clinic and project responded to a need created by a 2012 Maryland Court of Appeals decision, Unger v. State. It, as later clarified, required that all Maryland prisoners who were convicted by juries before 1981—237 older, long-incarcerated prisoners—be given new trials. This was because prior to 1981 Maryland judges in criminal trials were required to instruct the ...


The Privilege Doctrines--Are They Just Another Discovery Tool Utilized By The Tobacco Industry To Conceal Damaging Information?, Christine Hatfield 2018 Pace University School of Law

The Privilege Doctrines--Are They Just Another Discovery Tool Utilized By The Tobacco Industry To Conceal Damaging Information?, Christine Hatfield

Pace Law Review

This Comment will analyze the tobacco companies' use of the privilege doctrines to avoid litigation over the past thirty years, specifically focusing on the last fifteen years of litigation between this industry and its accusers. Part II of this Comment will discuss the pertinent discovery rules and the manner in which they are abused. Part III will examine the development, scope and limitations of the attorney-client privilege and work product doctrines, considering with particularity the corporate context and the applicability of the crime-fraud exception to these doctrines. Part IV will review the case law of the tobacco litigation, focusing on ...


State Bar Of California, Edith Jimenez, Andrew J. Van Arsdale, Bridget Fogarty Gramme 2018 University of San Diego

State Bar Of California, Edith Jimenez, Andrew J. Van Arsdale, Bridget Fogarty Gramme

California Regulatory Law Reporter

No abstract provided.


Three Transformative Ideals To Build A Better Crime Lab, Nicole B. Cásarez, Sandra G. Thompson 2018 University of St. Thomas

Three Transformative Ideals To Build A Better Crime Lab, Nicole B. Cásarez, Sandra G. Thompson

Georgia State University Law Review

This Article proposes that policy makers should consider establishing their jurisdiction’s crime laboratories as government corporations independent of law enforcement as a means of improving their quality and efficiency. Simply building new buildings or seeking accreditation will not solve the endemic problems that crime laboratories have faced. Rather, we propose that crime laboratories be restructured with a new organizational framework comparable to the Houston Forensic Science Center's (HFSC) status as a local government corporation (LGC), which has proven to be conducive to creating a new institutional culture.

From our experience with the HFSC, we also believe that crime ...


Safety From Flawed Forensic Sciences Evidence, Boaz Sangero 2018 Academic Center of Law & Business, Israel

Safety From Flawed Forensic Sciences Evidence, Boaz Sangero

Georgia State University Law Review

This article addresses the way to safety in the context of forensic sciences evidence. After presenting the current lack of safety, which I term “unsafety,” I raise some possible safety measures to contend with this. My suggestions are grounded on two bases: first, the specific analysis of each type of evidence in line with the most recent research on the subject; and second, modern safety theory and its application to the criminal justice system. It is important to stress that my proposals represent only some of the conceivable safety measures. Developing a comprehensive safety theory for the criminal justice system ...


Georgia State Law Review Symposium Keynote Address: Uncovering Forensic Flaws - An Outside Perspective, Spencer S. Hsu 2018 The Washington Post

Georgia State Law Review Symposium Keynote Address: Uncovering Forensic Flaws - An Outside Perspective, Spencer S. Hsu

Georgia State University Law Review

This transcript is a reproduction of the Keynote Address by Spencer Hsu at the 2017–2018 Georgia State University Law Review Symposium — From the Crime Scene to the Court room: The Future of Forensic Science Reform — on April 6, 2018.

Spencer Hsu is an investigative reporter at the Washington Post, a two-time Pulitzer Prize finalist, and a national Emmy Award nominee.


The First Amendment Case For Public Access To Secret Algorithms Used In Criminal Trials, Vera Eidelman 2018 American Civil Liberties Union

The First Amendment Case For Public Access To Secret Algorithms Used In Criminal Trials, Vera Eidelman

Georgia State University Law Review

As this Article sets forth, once a computerized algorithm is used by the government, constitutional rights may attach. And, at the very least, those rights require that algorithms used by the government as evidence in criminal trials be made available—both to litigants and the public. Scholars have discussed how the government’s refusal to disclose such algorithms runs afoul of defendants’ constitutional rights, but few have considered the public’s interest in these algorithms—or the widespread impact that public disclosure and auditing could have on ensuring their quality.

This Article aims to add to that discussion by setting ...


Deploying The Secret Police: The Use Of Algorithms In The Criminal Justice System, Jessica Gabel Cino 2018 Georgia State University College of Law

Deploying The Secret Police: The Use Of Algorithms In The Criminal Justice System, Jessica Gabel Cino

Georgia State University Law Review

Algorithms saturate our lives today; from curated song lists to recommending “friends” and news feeds, they factor into some of the most human aspects of decision-making, tapping into preferences based on an ever-growing amount of data. Regardless of whether the algorithm pertains to routing you around traffic jams or finding your next dinner, there is little regulation and even less transparency regarding just how these algorithms work. Paralleling this societal adoption, the criminal justice system now employs algorithms in some of the most important aspects of investigation and decision-making.

The lack of oversight is abundantly apparent in the criminal justice ...


A Discouraging Omen: A Critical Evaluation Of The Approved Uniform Language For Testimony And Reports For The Forensic Latent Print Discipline, Simon A. Cole 2018 University of California, Irvine

A Discouraging Omen: A Critical Evaluation Of The Approved Uniform Language For Testimony And Reports For The Forensic Latent Print Discipline, Simon A. Cole

Georgia State University Law Review

The theme of the 2018 Georgia State University Law Review symposium is the Future of Forensic Science Reform. In this Article, I will assess the prospects for reform through a critical evaluation of a document published in February 2018 by the United States Department of Justice (DOJ), the Approved Uniform Language for Testimony and Reports for the Forensic Latent Print Discipline (ULTR).

I argue that this document provides reason to be concerned about the prospects of forensic science reform. In Part I, I discuss the background of the ULTR. In Part II, I undertake a critical evaluation of the ULTR ...


A Characterization Of The Medical-Legal Partnership (Mlp) Of Nebraska Medicine, Jordan Pieper 2018 University of Nebraska Medical Center

A Characterization Of The Medical-Legal Partnership (Mlp) Of Nebraska Medicine, Jordan Pieper

Service Learning/Capstone Experience

This research study was completed at Legal Aid of Nebraska’s Health, Education, and Law Project through the partnership it has formed working with Nebraska Medicine and Iowa Legal Aid. Traditionally, health and disease have always been viewed exclusively as "healthcare" issues. But with healthcare consistently growing towards holistic approaches to help patients, we now know there are deeper, structural conditions of society that can act as strong driving forces of a person's poor daily living conditions that can negatively impact health. The importance of a Medical-Legal Partnership is that it considers a patient's social determinants of health ...


Health Care Referrals Out Of The Shadows: Recognizing The Looming Threat Of The Texas Patient Solicitation Act And Other Illegal Remuneration Statutes, Trenton Brown 2018 KreagerMitchell, PLLC

Health Care Referrals Out Of The Shadows: Recognizing The Looming Threat Of The Texas Patient Solicitation Act And Other Illegal Remuneration Statutes, Trenton Brown

St. Mary's Law Journal

Abstract forthcoming


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