Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Public Law and Legal Theory Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

3082 Full-Text Articles 1804 Authors 1331666 Downloads 96 Institutions

All Articles in Public Law and Legal Theory

Faceted Search

3082 full-text articles. Page 1 of 88.

Our Principled Constitution, Mitchell N. Berman 2017 University of Pennsylvania Law School

Our Principled Constitution, Mitchell N. Berman

Faculty Scholarship

Suppose that one of us contends, and the other denies, that transgender persons have constitutional rights to be treated in accord with their gender identity. It appears that we are disagreeing about “what the law is.” And, most probably, we disagree about what the law is on this matter because we disagree about what generally makes it the case that our constitutional law is this rather than that.

Constitutional theory should provide guidance. It should endeavor to explain what gives our constitutional rules the contents that they have, or what makes true constitutional propositions true. Call any such account a ...


Bail Reform: New Directions For Pretrial Detention And Release, Megan Stevenson, Sandra G. Mayson 2017 University of Pennsylvania

Bail Reform: New Directions For Pretrial Detention And Release, Megan Stevenson, Sandra G. Mayson

Faculty Scholarship

Our current pretrial system imposes high costs on both the people who are detained pretrial and the taxpayers who foot the bill. These costs have prompted a surge of bail reform around the country. Reformers seek to reduce pretrial detention rates, as well as racial and socioeconomic disparities in the pretrial system, while simultaneously improving appearance rates and reducing pretrial crime. The current state of pretrial practice suggests that there is ample room for improvement. Bail hearings are often cursory, with no defense counsel present. Money-bail practices lead to high rates of detention even among misdemeanor defendants and those who ...


Draft Report Of The Somali Criminal Law Recodification Initiative, Paul H. Robinson, Criminal Law Research Group 2017 University of Pennsylvania Law School

Draft Report Of The Somali Criminal Law Recodification Initiative, Paul H. Robinson, Criminal Law Research Group

Faculty Scholarship

The Government of Somalia and the International Development Law Organization (IDLO) jointly commissioned the drafting of a modern criminal code for Somalia that embodies fundamental Islamic principles. The proposed code developed by the Criminal Law Research Group in cooperation with the major Somali players of the criminal justice process is a modern and comprehensive penal code incorporating numerous cutting-edge innovations in drafting forms, code structure, and criminal law doctrine. It is also the first and only such code incorporating the major tenets and principles of Islamic law as currently practiced in Somalia. This two-volume report to the Somali Working Group ...


From Treaties To International Commitments: The Changing Landscape Of Foreign Relations Law, Jean Galbraith 2017 University of Pennsylvania

From Treaties To International Commitments: The Changing Landscape Of Foreign Relations Law, Jean Galbraith

Faculty Scholarship

Sometimes the United States makes international commitments in the manner set forth in the Treaty Clause. But far more often it uses congressional-executive agreements, sole executive agreements, and soft law commitments. Foreign relations law scholars typically approach these other processes from the perspective of constitutional law, seeking to determine the extent to which they are constitutionally permissible. In contrast, this Article situates the myriad ways in which the United States enters into international commitments as the product not only of constitutional law, but also of international law and administrative law. Drawing on all three strands of law provides a rich ...


Trigger Crimes & Social Progress: The Tragedy-Outrage-Reform Dynamic In America, Paul H. Robinson, Sarah M. Robinson 2017 University of Pennsylvania Law School

Trigger Crimes & Social Progress: The Tragedy-Outrage-Reform Dynamic In America, Paul H. Robinson, Sarah M. Robinson

Faculty Scholarship

Can a crime make our world better? Crimes are the worst of humanity’s wrongs but, oddly, they sometimes do more than anything else to improve our lives. It is often the outrageousness itself that does the work. Ordinary crimes are accepted as the background noise of everyday existence but some crimes make people stop and take notice – because they are so outrageous or so heart-wrenching.

This brief essay explores the dynamic of tragedy, outrage, and reform, illustrating how certain kinds of crimes can trigger real social progress. Several dozen such “trigger crimes” are identified but four in particular are ...


High-Stakes Interpretation, Ryan D. Doerfler 2017 University of Pennsylvania Law School

High-Stakes Interpretation, Ryan D. Doerfler

Faculty Scholarship

Courts look at text differently in high-stakes cases. Statutory language that would otherwise be ‘unambiguous’ suddenly becomes ‘less than clear.’ This, in turn, frees up courts to sidestep constitutional conflicts, avoid dramatic policy changes, and, more generally, get around undesirable outcomes. The standard account of this behavior is that courts’ failure to recognize ‘clear’ or ‘unambiguous’ meanings in such cases is motivated or disingenuous, and, at best, justified on instrumentalist grounds.

This Article challenges that account. It argues instead that, as a purely epistemic matter, it is more difficult to ‘know’ what a text means—and, hence, more difficult to ...


Rationing Criminal Justice, Richard A. Bierschbach, Stephanos Bibas 2017 Cardozo Law School

Rationing Criminal Justice, Richard A. Bierschbach, Stephanos Bibas

Faculty Scholarship

Of the many diagnoses of American criminal justice’s ills, few focus on externalities. Yet American criminal justice systematically overpunishes in large part because few mechanisms exist to force consideration of the full social costs of criminal justice interventions. Actors often lack good information or incentives to minimize the harms they impose. Part of the problem is structural: criminal justice is fragmented vertically among governments, horizontally among agencies, and individually among self-interested actors. Part is a matter of focus: doctrinally and pragmatically, actors overwhelmingly view each case as an isolated, short-term transaction to the exclusion of broader, long-term, and aggregate ...


Neuroscience Evidence In Forensic Contexts: Ethical Concerns, Stephen J. Morse 2017 University of Pennsylvania Law School

Neuroscience Evidence In Forensic Contexts: Ethical Concerns, Stephen J. Morse

Faculty Scholarship

This is a chapter in a volume, Ethics Dilemmas in Forensic Psychiatry and Psychology Practice, edited by Ezra E. H. Griffith, M.D. and to be published by Columbia University Press. The chapter addresses whether the use of new neuroscience techniques, especially non-invasive functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and the data from studies employing them raise new ethical issues for forensic psychiatrists and psychologists. The implicit thesis throughout is that if the legal questions, the limits of the new techniques and the relevance of neuroscience to law are properly understood, no new ethical issues are raised. A major ethical lapse ...


The Empty Idea Of “Equality Of Creditors”, David A. Skeel Jr. 2017 University of Pennsylvania Law School

The Empty Idea Of “Equality Of Creditors”, David A. Skeel Jr.

Faculty Scholarship

For two hundred years, the equality of creditors norm—the idea that similarly situated creditors should be treated similarly—has been widely viewed as the most important principle in American bankruptcy law, rivaled only by our commitment to a fresh start for honest but unfortunate debtors. I argue in this Article that the accolades are misplaced. Although the equality norm once was a rough proxy for legitimate concerns, such as curbing self-dealing, it no longer plays this role. Nor does it serve any other beneficial purpose.

Part I of this Article traces the historical emergence and evolution of the equality ...


Poverty Is The New Crime, Michelle Jenkins 2017 DePaul University

Poverty Is The New Crime, Michelle Jenkins

DePaul Journal for Social Justice

No abstract provided.


Social Justice And Legal Writing Collaborations: Promoting Student Engagement And Faculty Fulfillment, Kirsten Clement, Stephanie Roberts Hartung 2017 Florida Coastal School of Law

Social Justice And Legal Writing Collaborations: Promoting Student Engagement And Faculty Fulfillment, Kirsten Clement, Stephanie Roberts Hartung

DePaul Journal for Social Justice

No abstract provided.


Cycle Of Misconduct:How Chicago Has Repeatedly Failed To Police Its Police, Elizabeth J. Andonova 2017 DePaul University

Cycle Of Misconduct:How Chicago Has Repeatedly Failed To Police Its Police, Elizabeth J. Andonova

DePaul Journal for Social Justice

No abstract provided.


Table Of Contents, 2017 DePaul University

Table Of Contents

DePaul Journal for Social Justice

No abstract provided.


Capitalism And Unfreedom: Louis D. Brandeis And A Liberty Of The Left, Eric L. Apar 2017 The Graduate Center, City University of New York

Capitalism And Unfreedom: Louis D. Brandeis And A Liberty Of The Left, Eric L. Apar

All Graduate Works by Year: Dissertations, Theses, and Capstone Projects

The American Right features a well-developed—and well-heeled—infrastructure for promoting a conception of freedom as inextricable from capitalism. The American Left, by contrast, has seemed content to cede the territory, abandoning the ground of freedom for the terrain of “equality,” “justice,” “fairness,” and “prosperity.” This paper is an effort to address this asymmetry in the public discourse over the meaning of freedom. Its principal objective is to capture the vision of freedom embodied in the political and economic thought of Louis D. Brandeis, one of the American Left’s ablest expositors of freedom.

In addition, the paper has three ...


How Should Justice Policy Treat Young Offenders?, B J. Casey, Richard J. Bonnie, Andre Davis, David L. Faigman, Morris B. Hoffman, Owen D. Jones, Read Montague, Stephen J. Morse, Marcus E. Raichle, Jennifer A. Richeson, Elizabeth S. Scott, Laurence Steinberg, Kim A. Taylor-Thompson, Anthony D. Wagner 2017 Yale University - Department of Psychology

How Should Justice Policy Treat Young Offenders?, B J. Casey, Richard J. Bonnie, Andre Davis, David L. Faigman, Morris B. Hoffman, Owen D. Jones, Read Montague, Stephen J. Morse, Marcus E. Raichle, Jennifer A. Richeson, Elizabeth S. Scott, Laurence Steinberg, Kim A. Taylor-Thompson, Anthony D. Wagner

Faculty Scholarship

The justice system in the United States has long recognized that juvenile offenders are not the same as adults, and has tried to incorporate those differences into law and policy. But only in recent decades have behavioral scientists and neuroscientists, along with policymakers, looked rigorously at developmental differences, seeking answers to two overarching questions: Are young offenders, purely by virtue of their immaturity, different from older individuals who commit crimes? And, if they are, how should justice policy take this into account?

A growing body of research on adolescent development now confirms that teenagers are indeed inherently different from adults ...


A New Legal Framework For Children Seeking Special Immigrant Juvenile Status, Dalia Castillo-Granados, Yasmin Yavar 2017 University of Richmond

A New Legal Framework For Children Seeking Special Immigrant Juvenile Status, Dalia Castillo-Granados, Yasmin Yavar

Richmond Public Interest Law Review

No abstract provided.


American Cities Held Hostage: Public Stadiums And Pro Sports Franchises, David Schein, James Phillips, Caroline Rider 2017 University of Richmond

American Cities Held Hostage: Public Stadiums And Pro Sports Franchises, David Schein, James Phillips, Caroline Rider

Richmond Public Interest Law Review

No abstract provided.


Letter From The Editor, Bryce Buchmann 2017 Editor-in-Chief

Letter From The Editor, Bryce Buchmann

Richmond Public Interest Law Review

No abstract provided.


Table Of Contents, 2017 University of Richmond

Table Of Contents

Richmond Public Interest Law Review

No abstract provided.


"You Have No God": An Analysis Of The Prosecution Of Genocidal Rape In International Criminal Law, Cassie Powell 2017 University of Richmond

"You Have No God": An Analysis Of The Prosecution Of Genocidal Rape In International Criminal Law, Cassie Powell

Richmond Public Interest Law Review

No abstract provided.


Digital Commons powered by bepress