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Report Of The Delaware Criminal Law Recodification Project, Paul H. Robinson, Matthew Kussmaul, Ilya Rudyak, Criminal Law Research Group 2017 University of Pennsylvania Law School

Report Of The Delaware Criminal Law Recodification Project, Paul H. Robinson, Matthew Kussmaul, Ilya Rudyak, Criminal Law Research Group

Faculty Scholarship

In 1973, during the “first wave” of American criminal law recodification efforts following the publication of the Model Penal Code, Delaware adopted a new criminal code. While it represented a dramatic improvement over the law it replaced, its initial clarity and utility were greatly diminished by subsequent piecemeal legislation. Delaware’s current criminal code is lengthy, inconsistent, and replete with duplicative and outdated offenses that impose disproportional punishments. This process of criminal code deterioration is not unique to Delaware and plagues other U.S. jurisdictions. In 2015, however, stakeholders in Delaware’s criminal justice system initiated a code revision process ...


Arguing With Friends, William Baude, Ryan D. Doerfler 2017 University of Chicago

Arguing With Friends, William Baude, Ryan D. Doerfler

Faculty Scholarship

It is a fact of life that judges sometimes disagree about the best outcome in appealed cases. The question is what they should make of this. The two purest possibilities are to shut out all other views, or else to let them all in, leading one to concede ambiguity and uncertainty in most if not all contested cases.

Drawing on the philosophical concepts of “peer disagreement” and “epistemic peerhood,” we argue that there is a better way. Judges ought to give significant weight to the views of others, but only when those others share the judge’s basic methodology or ...


The Progressives: Racism And Public Law, Herbert J. Hovenkamp 2017 University of Pennsylvania Law School

The Progressives: Racism And Public Law, Herbert J. Hovenkamp

Faculty Scholarship

American Progressivism inaugurated the beginning of the end of American scientific racism. Its critics have been vocal, however. Progressives have been charged with promotion of eugenics, and thus with mainstreaming practices such as compulsory housing segregation, sterilization of those deemed unfit, and exclusion of immigrants on racial grounds. But if the Progressives were such racists, why is it that since the 1930s Afro-Americans and other people of color have consistently supported self-proclaimed progressive political candidates, and typically by very wide margins?

When examining the Progressives on race, it is critical to distinguish the views that they inherited from those that ...


Punctuated Equilibrium: A Model For Administrative Evolution, 44 J. Marshall L. Rev. 353 (2011), Mark C. Niles 2017 Selected Works

Punctuated Equilibrium: A Model For Administrative Evolution, 44 J. Marshall L. Rev. 353 (2011), Mark C. Niles

Mark Niles

No abstract provided.


For Legal Principles, Mitchell N. Berman 2017 University of Pennsylvania Law School

For Legal Principles, Mitchell N. Berman

Faculty Scholarship

Most legal thinkers believe that legal rules and legal principles are meaningfully distinguished. Many jurists may have no very precise distinction in mind, and those who do might not all agree. But it is widely believed that legal norms come in different logical types, and that one difference is reasonably well captured by a nomenclature that distinguishes “rules” from “principles.” Larry Alexander is the foremost challenger to this bit of legal-theoretic orthodoxy. In several articles, but especially in “Against Legal Principles,” an influential article co-authored with Ken Kress two decades ago, Alexander has argued that legal principles cannot exist.

In ...


Cooperative And Uncooperative Foreign Affairs Federalism, Jean Galbraith 2017 University of Pennsylvania Law School

Cooperative And Uncooperative Foreign Affairs Federalism, Jean Galbraith

Faculty Scholarship

This book review argues for reorienting how we think about federalism in relation to foreign affairs. In considering state and local engagement in foreign affairs, legal scholars often focus on the opportunities and limits provided by constitutional law. Foreign Affairs Federalism: The Myth of National Exclusivity by Michael Glennon and Robert Sloane does precisely this in a thoughtful and well-crafted way. But while the backdrop constitutional principles studied by Glennon and Sloane are important, so too are other types of law that receive far less attention. International law, administrative law, particular statutory schemes, and state law can all affect how ...


Revisiting Popular Action, Raúl Sánchez Gómez 2017 Universidad Pablo de Olavide

Revisiting Popular Action, Raúl Sánchez Gómez

DePaul Journal for Social Justice

No abstract provided.


Toiling In Trump's Vineyard Of Alternative Facts Lining Its Random Walk, David J. Cook 2017 DePaul University

Toiling In Trump's Vineyard Of Alternative Facts Lining Its Random Walk, David J. Cook

DePaul Journal for Social Justice

No abstract provided.


The Erosion Of Civil Rights Remedies: How Ashcroft V. Al-Kidd Altered Qualified Immunity, Madeleine Sharp 2017 DePaul University

The Erosion Of Civil Rights Remedies: How Ashcroft V. Al-Kidd Altered Qualified Immunity, Madeleine Sharp

DePaul Journal for Social Justice

No abstract provided.


Measuring “Progress” And “Regress” In Human Rights: Why We Need A Set Of Social Contract Measures To Replace Indices Of Violations And Slogans, David Lempert 2017 Independent Scholar

Measuring “Progress” And “Regress” In Human Rights: Why We Need A Set Of Social Contract Measures To Replace Indices Of Violations And Slogans, David Lempert

DePaul Journal for Social Justice

No abstract provided.


Criminal Selectivity In The United States: A History Plagued By Class & Race Bias, Valeria Vegh Weis 2017 DePaul University

Criminal Selectivity In The United States: A History Plagued By Class & Race Bias, Valeria Vegh Weis

DePaul Journal for Social Justice

No abstract provided.


Asian Americans And The Law: Sharing A Progressive Civil Rights Agenda During Uncertain Times, Harvey Gee 2017 DePaul University

Asian Americans And The Law: Sharing A Progressive Civil Rights Agenda During Uncertain Times, Harvey Gee

DePaul Journal for Social Justice

No abstract provided.


A Letter From The Editors, DePaul Journal for Social Justice Editorial Board 2017 DePaul University College of Law

A Letter From The Editors, Depaul Journal For Social Justice Editorial Board

DePaul Journal for Social Justice

No abstract provided.


Table Of Contents, 2017 DePaul University

Table Of Contents

DePaul Journal for Social Justice

No abstract provided.


Trigger Crimes & Social Progress: The Tragedy-Outrage-Reform Dynamic In America, Paul H. Robinson, Sarah M. Robinson 2017 University of Pennsylvania Law School

Trigger Crimes & Social Progress: The Tragedy-Outrage-Reform Dynamic In America, Paul H. Robinson, Sarah M. Robinson

Faculty Scholarship

Can a crime make our world better? Crimes are the worst of humanity’s wrongs but, oddly, they sometimes do more than anything else to improve our lives. It is often the outrageousness itself that does the work. Ordinary crimes are accepted as the background noise of everyday existence but some crimes make people stop and take notice – because they are so outrageous or so heart-wrenching.

This brief essay explores the dynamic of tragedy, outrage, and reform, illustrating how certain kinds of crimes can trigger real social progress. Several dozen such “trigger crimes” are identified but four in particular are ...


I Share, Therefore It's Mine, Donald J. Kochan 2017 Chapman University School of Law

I Share, Therefore It's Mine, Donald J. Kochan

Donald J. Kochan

Uniquely interconnecting lessons from law, psychology, and economics, this article aims to provide a more enriched understanding of what it means to “share” property in the sharing economy. It explains that there is an “ownership prerequisite” to the sharing of property, drawing in part from the findings of research in the psychology of child development to show when and why children start to share. They do so only after developing what psychologists call “ownership understanding.” What the psychological research reveals, then, is that the property system is well suited to create recognizable and enforceable ownership norms that include the rights ...


Letter From The Editor, Lauren Ritter 2017 University of Richmond

Letter From The Editor, Lauren Ritter

Richmond Public Interest Law Review

No abstract provided.


Fixing Virginia's Food-Beverage Ratio: Is This Inescapable Problem Also An Unsolvable One?, Mark Shuford 2017 University of Richmond

Fixing Virginia's Food-Beverage Ratio: Is This Inescapable Problem Also An Unsolvable One?, Mark Shuford

Richmond Public Interest Law Review

No abstract provided.


Table Of Contents, 2017 University of Richmond

Table Of Contents

Richmond Public Interest Law Review

No abstract provided.


Uncivil Asset Forfeiture: An Analysis Of Civil Asset Forfeiture And Virginia H.B. 48, Brent Ashley 2017 University of Richmond

Uncivil Asset Forfeiture: An Analysis Of Civil Asset Forfeiture And Virginia H.B. 48, Brent Ashley

Richmond Public Interest Law Review

No abstract provided.


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