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Nonmoral Theoretical Disagreement In Law, Alani Golanski 2016 Weitz & Luxenberg, P.C.

Nonmoral Theoretical Disagreement In Law, Alani Golanski

Alani Golanski

The central issue in the philosophy of law has been whether law’s content and validity rest on moral criteria. Scholars have viewed theoretical disagreements in law as the indicia of moral dispute. Both sides of the debate – those favoring and those opposing the view that moral justification may or does supply the criteria by which a rule or principle counts as "legal" – have accepted the notion that, if there is widespread theoretical disagreement in law, this would be compelling evidence of law’s incorporation of moral standards. Thus, theoretical disagreement poses a powerful challenge to the "positivist" approach, which ...


Preliminary Warnings On 'Constitutional' Idolatry, Brian Christopher Jones 2016 Academia Sinica

Preliminary Warnings On 'Constitutional' Idolatry, Brian Christopher Jones

Brian Christopher Jones

Although contemporary societies covet the notion of a written constitution, the UK still stands as one of the few jurisdictions not in possession such a single document. Yet recently there has been renewed discussion regarding whether the UK should draft its own constitution (or at least entrench some form of constitutional law). A recent House of Commons committee report thoroughly analysed this prospect, and many scholars and practitioners consider such a result inevitable. This piece argues that such a document should not be drafted, but if it is, it should surely not be called a "Constitution".

Difficulties arise because over ...


Fourth Amendment Time Machines (And What They Might Say About Police Body Cameras), Stephen E. Henderson 2016 University of Oklahoma College of Law

Fourth Amendment Time Machines (And What They Might Say About Police Body Cameras), Stephen E. Henderson

Stephen E Henderson

When it comes to criminal investigation, time travel is increasingly possible. Despite longstanding roots in traditional investigation, science is today providing something fundamentally different in the form of remarkably complete digital records. And those records not only store our past, but thanks to data mining and big data, in many circumstances they are eerily good at predicting our future. So, now that we stand on the threshold of investigatory time travel, how should the Fourth Amendment and legislation respond? How should we approach bulk government capture, such as by a solar-powered drone employing wide-area persistent stare technology? Is it meaningfully ...


From Baby M To Baby M(Anji): Regulating International Surrogacy Agreements, yehezkel Margalit 2016 SelectedWorks

From Baby M To Baby M(Anji): Regulating International Surrogacy Agreements, Yehezkel Margalit

Hezi Margalit

In 1985, when Kim Cotton became Britain’s first commercial surrogate mother, Europe was exposed to the issue of surrogacy for the first time on a large scale. Three years later, in 1988, the famous case of Baby M drew the attention of the American public to surrogacy as well. These two cases implicated fundamental ethical and legal issues regarding domestic surrogacy and triggered a fierce debate about motherhood, child-bearing, and the relationship between procreation, science and commerce. These two cases exemplified the debate regarding domestic surrogacy - a debate that has now been raging for decades. Contrary to the well-known ...


Bridging The Gap Between Intent And Status: A New Framework For Modern Parentage, yehezkel Margalit 2016 SelectedWorks

Bridging The Gap Between Intent And Status: A New Framework For Modern Parentage, Yehezkel Margalit

Hezi Margalit

The last few decades have witnessed dramatic changes in the conceptualization and methodologies of determining legal parentage in the U.S. and other countries in the western world. Through various sociological shifts, growing social openness and bio-medical innovations, the traditional definitions of family and parenthood have been dramatically transformed. This transformation has led to an acute and urgent need for legal and social frameworks to regulate the process of determining legal parentage. Moreover, instead of progressing in a piecemeal, ad-hoc manner, the framework for determining legal parentage should be comprehensive. Only a comprehensive solution will address the differing needs of ...


Disparaging The Supreme Court: Is Scotus In Serious Trouble?, Brian Christopher Jones 2015 Liverpool Hope University

Disparaging The Supreme Court: Is Scotus In Serious Trouble?, Brian Christopher Jones

Brian Christopher Jones

The piece argues that the Court is now subject to the widest and most sophisticated disparagement it has ever experienced, and that the tumultuous terms over the past two years have especially shown its vulnerability. Journalists and the general public are now thinking and speaking about the institution in a much different light than previously, and a deeper conversation about the proper role of the Court, especially in regard to constitutional review, has only just begun. Also, the piece argues that the justices’ disparagement of each other has contributed to this wider criticism, and that the recent health care and ...


Disaggregating Corpus Christi: The Illiberal Implications Of Hobby Lobby's Right To Free Exercise, Katharine Jackson 2015 Columbia University

Disaggregating Corpus Christi: The Illiberal Implications Of Hobby Lobby's Right To Free Exercise, Katharine Jackson

Katharine Jackson

N/A


Obergefell V. Hodges: How The Supreme Court Should Have Ruled, Adam Lamparello 2015 Indiana Tech Law School

Obergefell V. Hodges: How The Supreme Court Should Have Ruled, Adam Lamparello

Adam Lamparello

In Obergefell, et al. v. Hodges, Justice Kennedy’s majority opinion legalizing same-sex marriage was based on “the mystical aphorisms of a fortune cookie,” and “indefensible as a matter of constitutional law.” Kennedy’s opinion was comprised largely of philosophical ramblings about liberty that have neither a constitutional foundation nor any conceptual limitation. The fictional opinion below arrives at the same conclusion, but the reasoning is based on equal protection rather than due process principles. The majority opinion holds that same-sex marriage bans violate the Equal Protection Clause because they: (1) discriminate on the basis of gender; (2) promote gender-based ...


The Privacy Dilemma In Digital Arrestee Mug Shots Under The Foia 7(C) And State And Local Policy Recommendations, Ahad Syed 2015 University of Illinois College of Law

The Privacy Dilemma In Digital Arrestee Mug Shots Under The Foia 7(C) And State And Local Policy Recommendations, Ahad Syed

Ahad Syed

This Article examines the purpose and interpretation by courts of Freedom of Information Act’s 7(C) Exemption. Specifically, the Article sets out to unravel the current federal circuit court split over Exemption 7(C) by examining its application to the digital privacy dilemma as applied to arrestee photographs, commonly known as “mug shots.” Automated data-scraping programs continuously scour the internet, reaping, replicating, and reposting photographs of arrestees who may or may not have had charges dismissed in order to shame them into paying website owners for removal. While other commentators have argued for state law penalizing pay-to-remove mug shot ...


3d Printing And Healthcare: Will Laws, Lawyers, And Companies Stand In The Way Of Patient Care?, Evan R. Youngstrom 2015 University of San Diego

3d Printing And Healthcare: Will Laws, Lawyers, And Companies Stand In The Way Of Patient Care?, Evan R. Youngstrom

Evan R. Youngstrom

Today, our society is on a precipice of significant advancement in healthcare because 3D printing will usher in the next generation of medicine. The next generation will be driven by customization, which will allow doctors to replace limbs and individualize drugs. However, the next generation will be without large pharmaceutical companies and their justifications for strong intellectual property rights.

However, the current patent system (which is underpinned by a social tradeoff made from property incentives) is not flexible enough to cope with 3D printing’s rapid development. Very soon, the social tradeoff will no longer benefit society, so it must ...


Dean Rusk Award: "Double Jeopardy" On The High Seas: International Narcotics Traffickers Beware, Richard Lee 2015 University of Georgia School of Law

Dean Rusk Award: "Double Jeopardy" On The High Seas: International Narcotics Traffickers Beware, Richard Lee

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


City Growth And Cooperation Along The United States/Mexican Border, Nora M. Tocups 2015 University of Georgia School of Law

City Growth And Cooperation Along The United States/Mexican Border, Nora M. Tocups

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


Urbanization And Public Services, Fredric Stearns 2015 University of Georgia School of Law

Urbanization And Public Services, Fredric Stearns

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


Symposium: Legal Issues And Urbanization In Developing Countries-Foreward, Georgia Journal of International and Comparative Law 2015 University of Georgia School of Law

Symposium: Legal Issues And Urbanization In Developing Countries-Foreward, Georgia Journal Of International And Comparative Law

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


“To Promote The General Welfare” Addressing Political Corruption In America, Bruce M. Owen 2015 Stanford University

“To Promote The General Welfare” Addressing Political Corruption In America, Bruce M. Owen

Bruce Owen

Systemic (but lawful) political corruption reduces well-being and equity in America. Madisonian democracy is no longer capable of containing such corruption. Proposals currently on the table to stem corruption are unlikely to be effective and tend to undermine basic rights. This essay describes a new approach—regulating the output of corrupted legislative and administrative processes, rather than the inputs. Providing for substantive ex post review of direct and delegated legislation would be far more protective of the “general welfare” of the People than other reforms, while no more or less difficult to implement. Supporting an umpire proposal may be a ...


Corporate Law Doctrine And The Legacy Of American Legal Realism, Edward B. Rock 2015 University of Pennsylvania Law School

Corporate Law Doctrine And The Legacy Of American Legal Realism, Edward B. Rock

Faculty Scholarship

In this contribution to a symposium on "Legal Realism and Legal Doctrine," I examine the role that jurisprudence plays in corporate law doctrine. Through an examination of paired cases from the United States and United Kingdom, I offer a case study of the contrasting influence on corporate law judging of American Legal Realism versus traditional U.K. Doctrinalism.

Specialist judges in both systems, aided by specialist lawyers, clearly identify and understand the core policy issues involved in a dispute and arrive at sensible results. Adjusting for differences in background law and institutions, it seems likely that the disputes would ultimately ...


Freedom, Legality, And The Rule Of Law, John A. Bruegger 2015 California Southern University School of Law

Freedom, Legality, And The Rule Of Law, John A. Bruegger

John A Bruegger

There are numerous interactions between the rule of law and the concept of freedom, looking at Fuller’s eight principles of legality, the positive and negative theories of liberty, coercive and empowering laws, and the formal and substantive rules of law. Adherence to the rules of formal legality promote freedom by creating stability and predictability in the law, on which the people can then rely to plan their behaviors around the law – this is freedom under the law. Coercive laws can actually promote negative liberty up to pulling people out of a Hobbesian state of nature, and then thereafter can ...


Hegelian Dialectical Analysis Of United States Election Laws, Charles E. A. Lincoln IV 2015 Texas A&M University School of Law

Hegelian Dialectical Analysis Of United States Election Laws, Charles E. A. Lincoln Iv

Charles E. A. Lincoln IV

This Article uses the dialectical ideas of German philosopher Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel (1770-1833) in application to the progression of United States voting laws since the founding. This analysis can be used to interpret past progression of voting rights in the US as well as a provoking way to predict the future trends in US voting rights.

First, Hegel’s dialectical method is established as a major premise. Second, the general accepted history of United States voting laws from the 1770s to the current day is laid out as a minor premise. Third, the major premise of Hegel’s dialectical ...


Layers Of Law: The Case Of E-Cigarettes, Eric Feldman 2015 University of Pennsylvania Law School

Layers Of Law: The Case Of E-Cigarettes, Eric Feldman

Faculty Scholarship

This paper, written for a symposium on "Layers of Law and Social Order," connects the current debate over the regulation of electronic cigarettes with socio-legal scholarship on law, norms, and social control. Although almost every aspect of modern life that is subject to regulation can be seen through the framework ‘layers of law,’ e-cigarettes are distinguished by the rapid emergence of an unusually dense legal and regulatory web. In part, the dense fabric of e-cigarette law and regulation, both within and beyond the US, results from the lack of robust scientific and epidemiological data on the behavioral and health consequences ...


Harnessing Industry Influence, Laurence Tai 2015 NYU School of Law

Harnessing Industry Influence, Laurence Tai

New York University Public Law and Legal Theory Working Papers

An essential challenge of the regulatory state is that industry exerts influence that pulls policy in its direction. Observers have long pointed to “captured” regulation that harms the public interest and called for limiting industry influence. The underlying ideal in these calls is uninfluenced regulation that mirrors the public’s perspective. However, this aspiration neglects the public’s benefit from the information that an industry generates as it influences regulation, as well as the incentive that an industry’s benefit from influencing regulation provides it to incur the costs of producing such information. Thus, the standard strategy of insulating regulation ...


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