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Binding The Enforcers: The Administrative Law Struggle Behind Pres. Obama’S Immigration Actions, Michael Kagan 2016 University of Nevada, Las Vegas -- William S. Boyd School of Law

Binding The Enforcers: The Administrative Law Struggle Behind Pres. Obama’S Immigration Actions, Michael Kagan

Scholarly Works

President Obama’s ambitious use of executive discretion in immigration – especially the DACA and DAPA programs – should be understood in context of a struggle within the executive branch between the President and frontline enforcement officers in the Department of Homeland Security who have actively resisted his policy agenda. The so far successful litigation by 26 states to partially halt these programs has focused on this struggle within the executive branch, rather than on the stalemate between the President and Congress over legislative immigration reform. In preliminary rulings, the federal district court and the Court of Appeals have interpreted ambiguous provisions ...


The Commander In Chief's Authority To Combat Climate Change, Mark P. Nevitt 2015 SelectedWorks

The Commander In Chief's Authority To Combat Climate Change, Mark P. Nevitt

Mark P Nevitt

Climate change is the world’s greatest environmental threat. It also is increasingly understood as a threat to domestic and international peace and security. In recognition of this threat, the President has taken the initiative to prepare for climate change’s impact – in some cases drawing sharp objections from Congress. While both the President and Congress have constitutional authorities to address the national security threat posed by climate change, the precise contours of their overlapping powers are not clear. As Commander in Chief, the President has the constitutional authority to repel sudden attacks and take care that the laws are ...


Stemming The Hobby Lobby Tidal Wave: Why Rfra Challenges To Obama's Executive Order Prohibiting Federal Contractors From Discriminating Against Lgbt Employees Will Not Succeed, Kayla Higgins 2015 SelectedWorks

Stemming The Hobby Lobby Tidal Wave: Why Rfra Challenges To Obama's Executive Order Prohibiting Federal Contractors From Discriminating Against Lgbt Employees Will Not Succeed, Kayla Higgins

Kayla Higgins

On July 21, 2014 President Obama released Executive Order 13672, which expressly aimed to provide for a uniform policy for the Federal Government to prohibit discrimination and take further steps to promote economy and efficiency in Federal Government procurement by prohibiting discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity. Some commentators believe that the order “could be the next battleground” for the competing views of religious leaders and liberals when it comes to how to weigh religious liberty against other priorities. However, there are two main reasons why the most recent executive order should not crumble under the Hobby Lobby ...


Clemency 2.0, Paul J. Larkin Jr. 2015 The Heritage Foundation

Clemency 2.0, Paul J. Larkin Jr.

Paul J Larkin Jr.

A trope heard throughout criminal justice circles today is that the system is a dystopia. Although most of the discussion and proposed remedies have centered on sentencing or release, this article focuses on clemency, which has become a controversial subject. The last few Presidents have rarely exercised their pardon power or have used it for ignoble reasons. The former withers the clemency power; the latter besmirches it. President Obama sought to kick start the clemency process through the Clemency Project 2014, which sought to provide relief to the 30,000 crack cocaine offenders unable to take advantage of the prospective-only ...


A Constitutinal Analysis Of The Ncaa’S New Autonomous Governance Model And Its Effects On Student Athletes, Non-Athletes, And Professors – Is The Termination Of Uab’S Football Program Just The Beginning Of Things To Come?, Tyler N. Wilson 2015 St. Mary's University School of Law in San Antonio, TX

A Constitutinal Analysis Of The Ncaa’S New Autonomous Governance Model And Its Effects On Student Athletes, Non-Athletes, And Professors – Is The Termination Of Uab’S Football Program Just The Beginning Of Things To Come?, Tyler N. Wilson

Tyler N Wilson

No abstract provided.


Out Of Breath And Down To The Wire: A Call For Constitution-Focused Police Reform, Nancy C. Marcus 2015 Indiana Tech Law School

Out Of Breath And Down To The Wire: A Call For Constitution-Focused Police Reform, Nancy C. Marcus

Nancy C Marcus

This article chronicles a series of breathtakingly disturbing police killings of unarmed black men (and a boy) in a single year’s time, spanning from between July 2014 to July 2015, which have resulted in national outcry and sparked a movement toward police reform across the country. The article details a number of the suggested remedial measures offered to address the problem of excessive lethal police force across the country and concludes that, among the proposed reforms, one of the most important is a renewed emphasis of critical constitutional limitations upon permissible lethal police force and other unjustified treatment of ...


Conflicted Counselors: Retaliation Protections For Attorney-Whistleblowers In An Inconsistent Regulatory Regime, Jennifer M. Pacella 2015 Assistant Professor of Law, City University of New York, Baruch College, Zicklin School of Business

Conflicted Counselors: Retaliation Protections For Attorney-Whistleblowers In An Inconsistent Regulatory Regime, Jennifer M. Pacella

Jennifer M. Pacella, Esq.

Attorneys, especially in-house counsel, are subject to retaliation by employers in much the same way as traditional whistleblowers, often experiencing retaliation and loss of livelihood for reporting instances of wrongdoing about their clients. Although attorney-whistleblowing undoubtedly invokes ethical concerns, attorneys who “appear and practice” before the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) are required by federal law to act as internal whistleblowers under the Sarbanes-Oxley Act (“SOX”) and report evidence of material violations of the law within the organizations that they represent. An attorney’s failure to comply with these obligations will result in SEC-imposed civil penalties and disciplinary action. Recent ...


Harnessing Industry Influence, Laurence Tai 2015 NYU School of Law

Harnessing Industry Influence, Laurence Tai

New York University Public Law and Legal Theory Working Papers

An essential challenge of the regulatory state is that industry exerts influence that pulls policy in its direction. Observers have long pointed to “captured” regulation that harms the public interest and called for limiting industry influence. The underlying ideal in these calls is uninfluenced regulation that mirrors the public’s perspective. However, this aspiration neglects the public’s benefit from the information that an industry generates as it influences regulation, as well as the incentive that an industry’s benefit from influencing regulation provides it to incur the costs of producing such information. Thus, the standard strategy of insulating regulation ...


Harnessing Industry Influence, Laurence Tai 2015 NYU School of Law

Harnessing Industry Influence, Laurence Tai

New York University Law and Economics Working Papers

An essential challenge of the regulatory state is that industry exerts influence that pulls policy in its direction. Observers have long pointed to “captured” regulation that harms the public interest and called for limiting industry influence. The underlying ideal in these calls is uninfluenced regulation that mirrors the public’s perspective. However, this aspiration neglects the public’s benefit from the information that an industry generates as it influences regulation, as well as the incentive that an industry’s benefit from influencing regulation provides it to incur the costs of producing such information. Thus, the standard strategy of insulating regulation ...


Obama's Get-Out-Of-Jail-Free Decree, Paul H. Robinson 2015 University of Pennsylvania Law School

Obama's Get-Out-Of-Jail-Free Decree, Paul H. Robinson

Faculty Scholarship

While agreeing that sentences for nonviolent drug offenses are too long, this Wall Street Journal op-ed piece argues that the large-scale clemency program planned by President Obama is misguided. It sets a dangerous precedent for using the clemency power beyond its traditional and intended purpose of providing a last-resort check on fairness and justice errors in individual cases, and instead uses the power to set sentencing policy. While many people will like the results of the current program, they will be less than happy when some future president uses it as precedent to promote a sentencing policy of which they ...


Aumf Panel Transcript, Rosa Brooks, Benjamin Wittes 2015 Pepperdine University

Aumf Panel Transcript, Rosa Brooks, Benjamin Wittes

Pepperdine Law Review

No abstract provided.


Lost In Translation? The Relevancy Of Kobe Bryant And Aristotle To The Legality Of Modern Warfare, Rachel E. VanLandingham 2015 Pepperdine University

Lost In Translation? The Relevancy Of Kobe Bryant And Aristotle To The Legality Of Modern Warfare, Rachel E. Vanlandingham

Pepperdine Law Review

What do Kobe Bryant, Aristotle, and the continuing U.S. response to the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001, have in common? President Barack Obama told the New Yorker in early 2014, in response to a question regarding the seeming resurgence of al Qaeda in Syria and Iraq, that “[t]he analogy we use around here sometimes, and I think is accurate, is if a jayvee team puts on Lakers uniforms that doesn’t make them Kobe Bryant.” As this example demonstrates, the Obama Administration and others, in reference to the legality of the use of armed force against al ...


Lawyering Wars: Failing Leadership, Risk Aversion, And Lawyer Creep—Should We Expect More Lone Survivors?, Arthur Rizer 2015 West Virginia University

Lawyering Wars: Failing Leadership, Risk Aversion, And Lawyer Creep—Should We Expect More Lone Survivors?, Arthur Rizer

Indiana Law Journal

“We are a nation of laws, not men.” This motto—made famous by the Supreme Court case Marbury v. Madison1—has existed since the founding of the United States. This maxim embodies the sentiment that, in order to prevent tyranny, citizens should be governed by fixed law rather than the whims of a dictator. In his decision, Chief Justice John Marshall did not qualify his remarks by saying, “we are a nation of laws, except in time of war.” Indeed with the modern U.S. military, Cicero’s observation that “[l]aws are inoperative in war” has never been further ...


Constitutional Disequilibrium In The Declining Marginal Cost Of War, Lucas Issacharoff, Samuel Issacharoff 2015 New York University School of Law

Constitutional Disequilibrium In The Declining Marginal Cost Of War, Lucas Issacharoff, Samuel Issacharoff

New York University Public Law and Legal Theory Working Papers

Institutional practices evolve to fill gaps in all constitutional blueprints. One of the underappreciated features of the initial constitutional settlement of authority over war was the accountability of the Executive through the process of budgetary authorization, and the corresponding need for Congress to answer to the citizenry for the tax implications of military expenditures. This political accountability is more complex than often described, consisting not merely of the division of the “declare war” and “commander in chief” clauses of Article I and Article II, but also of the temporal limitation of the budgetary power for the army and a variety ...


Closing The Door To Lost Earnings Under The National Childhood Vaccine Injury Act Of 1986, Aaron M. Levin 2015 The George Washington University Law School

Closing The Door To Lost Earnings Under The National Childhood Vaccine Injury Act Of 1986, Aaron M. Levin

Aaron M Levin

After a wave of lawsuits against vaccine manufacturers hindered the profitability and production of life-saving vaccines, Congress enacted The National Childhood Vaccine Injury Act of 1986. The Act offers an incentive for individuals to get vaccinated in order to mitigate the population’s exposure to disease, while encouraging the continued production of these serums by pharmaceutical companies. Although imperfect, the Vaccine Act fosters promise in filtering out frivolous claims and provides a central route for due process to the individuals who suffer from a vaccine-related injury. By removing a potential state tort issue to the Federal Circuit, Congress created a ...


What Should Restatement (Fourth) Say About Treaty Interpretation?, Jean Galbraith 2015 University of Pennsylvania Law School

What Should Restatement (Fourth) Say About Treaty Interpretation?, Jean Galbraith

Faculty Scholarship

Restatement (Second) and Restatement (Third) of Foreign Relations Law took notably different approaches to treaty interpretation, reflecting intervening changes in the legal landscape. This symposium contribution identifies five developments in international and domestic law since Restatement (Third). It then considers their import for the forthcoming Restatement (Fourth). Most importantly, it argues that Restatement (Fourth) should fully incorporate two articles on treaty interpretation from the Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties into its black-letter provisions. Since the time of Restatement (Third), these articles have become central to international practice on treaty interpretation, and the principles they set forth are broadly ...


Loopholes For Circumventing The Constitution: Unrestrained Bulk Surveillance On Americans By Collecting Network Traffic Abroad, Axel Arnbak, Sharon Goldberg 2015 University of Amsterdam

Loopholes For Circumventing The Constitution: Unrestrained Bulk Surveillance On Americans By Collecting Network Traffic Abroad, Axel Arnbak, Sharon Goldberg

Michigan Telecommunications and Technology Law Review

This Article reveals interdependent legal and technical loopholes that the US intelligence community could use to circumvent constitutional and statutory safeguards for Americans. These loopholes involve the collection of Internet traffic on foreign territory, and leave Americans as unprotected as foreigners by current United States (US) surveillance laws. This Article will also describe how modern Internet protocols can be manipulated to deliberately divert American’s traffic abroad, where traffic can then be collected under a more permissive legal regime (Executive Order 12333) that is overseen solely by the executive branch of the US government. Although the media has reported on ...


Death Squads And Death Lists: Targeted Killing And The Character Of The State, Jeremy Waldron 2015 NYU School of Law

Death Squads And Death Lists: Targeted Killing And The Character Of The State, Jeremy Waldron

New York University Public Law and Legal Theory Working Papers

The intention of this paper is to urge critical reflection upon current US practices of targeted killing by considering not just whether acts of targeted killing can be legally justified but also what sort of state we are turning into when we organize the use of lethal force in this way -- maintaining a list of named enemies of the state who are to be eliminated in this way. My paper uses the unpleasant terminology of "death lists" and "death squads" to jolt us into this reflection. Of course, there are differences between the activities of death squads in (say) El ...


The President's Wartime Detention Authority : What History Teaches Us, Anirudh Sivaram 2015 Yale University

The President's Wartime Detention Authority : What History Teaches Us, Anirudh Sivaram

Harvey M. Applebaum ’59 Award

This thesis examines the extent of the President’s wartime detention authority over citizens (in particular, detention authority pursuant to Article II of the U.S. Constitution) through a legal-historical lens. Some Presidents (Abraham Lincoln, Franklin Roosevelt, George W. Bush) have historically relied on Article II authority for detention, while others (Ulysses Grant, Barack Obama) have disclaimed the notion that such authority exists. Clarifying the scope and source of the Presidential detention authority over citizens bears both theoretical and real-world relevance. Theoretically, it lies at the confluence of two central American constitutional traditions – the separation of powers, and the protection ...


Trade Promotional Authority: Evaluating The Necessity Of Congressional Oversight And Accountability, Margaret M. Kim 2015 American University Washington College of Law

Trade Promotional Authority: Evaluating The Necessity Of Congressional Oversight And Accountability, Margaret M. Kim

Margaret M. Kim

On April 16, 2015, legislation to reauthorize Trade Promotion Authority (TPA) was introduced as the Bipartisan Congressional Trade Priorities and Accountability Act of 2015 (TPA-2015 or the Legislation) in the House and the Senate. TPA, formerly known as the fast-track authority, refers to “[the] authority of the U.S. president to negotiate international agreements that Congress can approve or disapprove, but not amend or filibuster.” TPA was last renewed under the Trade Act of 2002 during the George W. Bush Administration. Until it expired on July 1, 2007, eleven Free Trade Agreements (FTAs) were implemented under the supervision of President ...


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