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Dropping The Ball: How Fifa Can Address The Match Fixing Problem Facing Professional Football, Katarzyna Kordas 2015 SelectedWorks

Dropping The Ball: How Fifa Can Address The Match Fixing Problem Facing Professional Football, Katarzyna Kordas

Katarzyna Kordas

This comment discusses the evils of match fixing in professional football and urges FIFA to take action to completely eradicate the issue. The integrity of professional football is suffering as a result, and the problem will only continue to grow if FIFA and other football organizations do not address the issue head on. The comment recaps recent and historic scandals that tarnished the reputation of professional football and considers the motivations that lead individuals to fix matches. It also analyzes FIFA’s shortcomings in its response to match fixing and criticizes its lack of investigation in recent years. The organization ...


Sports Scandals From The Top-Down: Comparative Analysis Of Management, Owner, And Athlete Discipline In The Nfl & Nba, Jaimie K. McFarlin, Joshua S.E. Lee 2015 Harvard University

Sports Scandals From The Top-Down: Comparative Analysis Of Management, Owner, And Athlete Discipline In The Nfl & Nba, Jaimie K. Mcfarlin, Joshua S.E. Lee

Jaimie K. McFarlin

This article serves to discuss the current landscape of professional sports discipline and commissioner power in the NFL & NBA, specifically understanding the discipline of management and ownership in the major leagues as compared to player discipline when franchise ownership interests and commissioner power conflict. Furthermore, these particular events illuminate the differences between discipline in professional sports and non-sports contexts.


The Art Of A Loan: “When The Loan Sharks Meet Damien Hirst’S ‘$12-Million Stuffed Shark’”, Valerie Medelyan 2015 Chicago Stock Exchange

The Art Of A Loan: “When The Loan Sharks Meet Damien Hirst’S ‘$12-Million Stuffed Shark’”, Valerie Medelyan

Pace Law Review

Part I of this Article introduces the reader to the typical types of loans that banks make, includes an in-depth description of a secured loan, and finishes with a discussion of the due diligence requirements of banks. Part II identifies the unique complexities posed by art when it is used as collateral, comparing and contrasting the banks’ process when approving a loan secured by commonly-used assets versus a loan secured by art. Part III discusses the banks’ growing willingness to approve art-backed loans, and identifies the safeguards built into such deals. Part IV introduces the sub-prime lenders of the art ...


Pace Intellectual Property, Sports & Entertainment Law Forum, Volume 5, Issue 1, Spring 2015, 2015 Pace University

Pace Intellectual Property, Sports & Entertainment Law Forum, Volume 5, Issue 1, Spring 2015

Pace Intellectual Property, Sports & Entertainment Law Forum

The staff of PIPSELF has worked diligently this year in selecting and preparing original and appealing articles concerning emerging issues in the fields of intellectual property, sports, and entertainment law for this issue. We welcome our readers to send comments and feedback: e-mail us at pipself@law.pace.edu, visit our Twitter @PIPSELF, or ‘like’ us on Facebook at “Pace Intellectual Property, Sports & Entertainment Law Forum.”


Network Neutrality And Consumer Demand For “Better Than Best Efforts” Traffic Management, Rob Frieden 2015 Penn State University

Network Neutrality And Consumer Demand For “Better Than Best Efforts” Traffic Management, Rob Frieden

Rob Frieden

This paper assesses whether and how ISPs can offer quality of service enhancements, at premium prices for full motion video, while still complying with the new rules and regulations established by the Federal Communications Commission (“FCC”) in March, 2015. The paper explains that having made the controversial decision to reclassify all forms of Internet access as a telecommunications service, the FCC increases regulatory uncertainty. In particular, the FCC has failed to identify instances where “retail ISPs,” serving residential broadband subscribers, can offer quality of service enhancements that serve real consumer wants without harming competition and the ability of most content ...


The Art Of Atonement: How Mandated Transparency Can Help Return Masterpieces Lost During World War Ii, Lucia Foulkes 2015 Boston College Law School

The Art Of Atonement: How Mandated Transparency Can Help Return Masterpieces Lost During World War Ii, Lucia Foulkes

Boston College International and Comparative Law Review

Sixty years after the end of World War II much of the artwork looted or forcibly sold during the war has yet to be returned to its rightful owners. One of the primary problems encountered by individuals pursuing claims is that it is difficult to locate the necessary documentation on provenance. Organizations with information on a piece’s history, museums in particular, often have a disincentive to share information that could assist in an heir’s claim. A mandatory reporting requirement, for government and museum officials with unique access to information on provenance, would counterbalance that reluctance, and address the ...


3d Printing: Cultural Property As Intellectual Property, Charles Cronin 2015 USC Gould School of Law

3d Printing: Cultural Property As Intellectual Property, Charles Cronin

University of Southern California Legal Studies Working Paper Series

Long before the onset of the now-­‐emblematic quarrel between England and Greece over the Parthenon marbles, nations and tribes have squabbled over the extraterritorial transfer of objects of purported cultural significance. Over the past few decades, however, there has been a dramatic increase in the number of cultural property repatriation claims, mostly targeting U.S. collections.

The value of cultural artifacts is generated largely by the intellectual expression they manifest. Digital technologies make increasingly possible the creation of reproductions of even three-­‐dimensional artifacts, which are indistinguishable from the originals. This development challenges our attributing value to the “aura ...


The "Csi Effect" And Its Potential Impact On Juror Decisions, John Alldredge 2015 San Jose State University

The "Csi Effect" And Its Potential Impact On Juror Decisions, John Alldredge

Themis: Research Journal of Justice Studies and Forensic Science

The “CSI Effect” was first described in the media as a phenomenon resulting from viewing forensic and crime based television shows. This effect influences jurors to have unrealistic expectations of forensic science during a criminal trial and affect jurors’ decisions in the conviction or acquittal process. Research has shown the “CSI Effect” has a possible pro-defense bias, in that jurors are less likely to convict without the presence of some sort of forensic evidence. Some studies show actors in the criminal justice system are changing their tactics, as if this effect has a significant influence, causing them to request unnecessary ...


Invisible Labor, Invisible Play: Online Gold Farming And The Boundary Between Jobs And Games, Julian Dibbell 2015 SelectedWorks

Invisible Labor, Invisible Play: Online Gold Farming And The Boundary Between Jobs And Games, Julian Dibbell

Julian Dibbell

When does work become play, and play work? Courts have considered the question in a variety of economic contexts, from student athletes seeking recognition as employees to professional blackjack players seeking to be treated by casinos just like casual players. Here I apply the question to a relatively novel context: that of online gold farming, a gray-market industry in which wage-earning workers, largely based in China, are paid to play online fantasy games (MMOs) that reward them with virtual items their employers sell for profit to the same games’ casual players. Gold farming is clearly a job (and under the ...


Andy Warhol’S Pantry, Brian L. Frye 2015 University of Kentucky College of Law

Andy Warhol’S Pantry, Brian L. Frye

Law Faculty Scholarly Articles

This Article examines Andy Warhol’s use of food and food products as a metaphor for commerce and consumption. It observes that Warhol’s use of images and marks was often inconsistent with copyright and trademark doctrine, and suggests that the fair use doctrine should in-corporate a “Warhol test.”


Silent Similarity, Jessica D. Litman 2015 University of Michigan Law School

Silent Similarity, Jessica D. Litman

Articles

From 1909 to 1930, U.S. courts grappled with claims by authors of prose works claiming that works in a new art form—silent movies—had infringed their copyrights. These cases laid the groundwork for much of modern copyright law, from their broad expansion of the reproduction right, to their puzzled grappling with the question how to compare works in dissimilar media, to their confusion over what sort of evidence should be relevant to show copyrightability, copying and infringement. Some of those cases—in particular, Nichols v. Universal Pictures—are canonical today. They are not, however, well-understood. In particular, the ...


, The Law School Of The Future: How The Synergies Of Convergence Will Transform The Very Notion Of “Law Schools” During The 21st Century From “Places” To “Platforms”, Jeffrey A. Van Detta 2015 Atlanta's John Marshall Law School

, The Law School Of The Future: How The Synergies Of Convergence Will Transform The Very Notion Of “Law Schools” During The 21st Century From “Places” To “Platforms”, Jeffrey A. Van Detta

Jeffrey A. Van Detta

This article discusses the disruptive change in American (and trans-national) legal education that the convergence of technology and economics is bringing to legal education. It posits, and then defends, the following assertion about "law schools of the future":

“Law schools will no longer be ‘places’ in the sense of a single faculty located on a physical campus. In the future, law schools will consist of an array of technologies and instructional techniques brought to bear, in convergence, on particular educational needs and problems.”

This paper elaborates on that prediction, discussing the ways in which technology will positively impact legal education ...


Nsfw: An Empirical Study Of Scandalous Trademarks, Megan M. Carpenter 2015 Texas A&M University School of Law

Nsfw: An Empirical Study Of Scandalous Trademarks, Megan M. Carpenter

Megan M Carpenter

This project is an empirical analysis of trademarks that have received rejections based on the judgment that they are “scandalous." It is the first of its kind.

The Lanham Act bars registration for trademarks that are “scandalous” and “immoral.” While much has been written on the morality provisions in the Lanham Act generally, this piece is the first scholarly project that engages an empirical analysis of 2(a) rejections based on scandalousness; it contains a look behind the scenes at how the morality provisions are applied throughout the trademark registration process. We study which marks are being rejected, what evidence ...


Common Law Marriage In "Measure For Measure", Lawrence N. Weiss J.D. (Columbia 1966) 2015 SelectedWorks

Common Law Marriage In "Measure For Measure", Lawrence N. Weiss J.D. (Columbia 1966)

Lawrence N Weiss J.D. (Columbia 1966)

This paper explores the confusing expressions of the elements of "common law marriage" in Shakespeare's "Measure for Measure," its sources and its progeny, and reaches the surprising conclusion that Elizabethan/Jacobean law might not have been as we commonly understand it and as Blackstone summarized it.


The Right To Read, Lea Shaver 2015 Indiana University - Robert H. McKinney School of Law

The Right To Read, Lea Shaver

Lea Shaver

Reading – for education and for pleasure – may be framed as a personal indulgence, a moral virtue, or even a civic duty. What are the implications of framing reading as a human right?

Although novel, the rights-based frame finds strong support in international human rights law. The right to read need not be defended as a “new” human right. Rather, it can be located at the intersection of more familiar guarantees. Well-established rights to education, science, culture, and freedom of expression, among others, provide the necessary normative support for recognizing a universal right to read as already implicit in international law ...


Making A Mark: Taking A Glance At Trademarks And Graphic Infringement, Heather S. Ray 2015 California Western School of Law

Making A Mark: Taking A Glance At Trademarks And Graphic Infringement, Heather S. Ray

Heather S Ray

No abstract provided.


Brief Of Antitrust Scholars As Amici Curiae In Support Of Appellees, Supporting Affirmance, Chris Sagers, K. Craig Wildfang, Ryan W. Marth, David Martinez 2015 Cleveland State University

Brief Of Antitrust Scholars As Amici Curiae In Support Of Appellees, Supporting Affirmance, Chris Sagers, K. Craig Wildfang, Ryan W. Marth, David Martinez

Law Faculty Briefs

Amici urge affirmance for three principal reasons. First, we elaborate a point to dispel Appellant's suggestion that antitrust somehow does not belong here. Second, we show that ordinary rule of reason treatment was appropriate. Relying rather daringly on a case that it overwhelmingly lost, Appellant asks this Court to find within NCAA v. Board of Regents of Univ. of Okla., 468 U. S. 85 (1984), a rule that its "amateurism" or "eligibility" restraints are "valid...as a matter of law." NCAA Br. at 14, 22. Board of Regents did not say that, and even Appellant's own amici admit ...


Popular Culture's Portrayal Of Attorney Decision-Making And It's Consequences- An Analysis Of An Attorney's Internal Ethical Conflict In Film, Tara M. Parente 2015 Barry University

Popular Culture's Portrayal Of Attorney Decision-Making And It's Consequences- An Analysis Of An Attorney's Internal Ethical Conflict In Film, Tara M. Parente

Tara M. Parente

This paper explores how attorneys deal with ethical conflicts throughout their careers. The paper also incorporates the use of the films The Devil's Advocate and Counsellor at Law and how the attorneys in these films deal with the pressures of being an attorney. Popular culture portrays attorneys in a specific light and exemplifies the struggles they endure while advancing their careers.


Music As Cultural Heritage: Analysis Of The Means Of Preventing The Exploitation Of Intangible Cultural Heritage, 14 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 228 (2015), Ronald Inawat 2015 The John Marshall Law School

Music As Cultural Heritage: Analysis Of The Means Of Preventing The Exploitation Of Intangible Cultural Heritage, 14 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 228 (2015), Ronald Inawat

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

What started out as a law school requirement quickly snowballed into an analysis of the relationship between intellectual property and cultural heritage. I am a music guy at heart, having played piano since I was five years old, having composed one song (after multiple tries), and now working directly with musicians and artists. So when I began researching a topic for an article that would connect the dots between the cultural heritage and its respective music, I could only come across legal doctrine and articles that focused heavily on tangible art and artifacts. So what happened to the music? After ...


Did Copyright Kill The Radio Star? Why The Recorded Music Industry And Copyright Act Should Welcome Webcasters Into The Fold, 14 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 292 (2015), Patrick Koncel 2015 The John Marshall Law School

Did Copyright Kill The Radio Star? Why The Recorded Music Industry And Copyright Act Should Welcome Webcasters Into The Fold, 14 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 292 (2015), Patrick Koncel

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

The Copyright Act has not kept pace with the times, and the next revolution is going full stream ahead. Rather than adapt, entrenched interests at the Copyright table push for more protection, while new technologies are demonized and underrepresented. The resulting Copyright Act’s provisions relating to internet-based radio, ranging from passive over-the-air broadcasts to fully interactive music hosting sites, are a patchwork of accommodations and concessions to these interests. For all non-interactive services, licensing music typically occurs within the Copyright Act’s compulsory licensing system. For interactive webcasters, licensing negotiations take place with the copyright holders directly. These negotiations ...


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