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Work Made For Hire – Analyzing The Multifactor Balancing Test, Ryan G. Vacca 2015 The University of Akron School of Law

Work Made For Hire – Analyzing The Multifactor Balancing Test, Ryan G. Vacca

Ryan G. Vacca

Authorship, and hence, initial ownership of copyrighted works is oftentimes controlled by the 1976 Copyright Act’s work made for hire doctrine. This doctrine states that works created by employees within the scope of their employment result in the employer owning the copyright. One key determination in this analysis is whether the hired party is an employee or independent contractor. In 1989, the U.S. Supreme Court, in CCNV v. Reid, answered the question of how employees are distinguished from independent contractors by setting forth a list of factors courts should consider. Unfortunately, the Supreme Court did not give further ...


“Can I Profit From My Own Name And Likeness As A College Athlete?” The Predictive Legal Analytics Of A College Player’S Publicity Rights Vs. First Amendment Rights Of Others, Roger M. Groves 2014 Florida Coastal School of Law

“Can I Profit From My Own Name And Likeness As A College Athlete?” The Predictive Legal Analytics Of A College Player’S Publicity Rights Vs. First Amendment Rights Of Others, Roger M. Groves

Roger M. Groves

Two federal court decisions during 2013 have changed the game for college students versus the schools, the NCAA and video game makers. This article explores whether for the first time in history these athletes can profit from their own name and likeness and prevent others from doing so.

But those cases still leave many untested applications to new facts – facts that the courts have not faced. Particularly intriguing is how 21st Century technology will apply to this area in future litigation. No publicity rights case or article to date has explored the application of predictive analytics, computer programs, algorithms ...


The Political Function Of Revelation: Lessons From The Hebrew Bible, Geoffrey P. Miller 2014 NELLCO

The Political Function Of Revelation: Lessons From The Hebrew Bible, Geoffrey P. Miller

New York University Public Law and Legal Theory Working Papers

This article examines the political theory of revelation in the narratives of the Hebrew Bible, particularly the theophany at Sinai. Revelation occurs when God communicates information to human beings. The biblical narratives use the modality of a revelation to signal the importance of the message being conveyed. They also identify techniques for limiting revelation’s destabilizing potential: embedding, which restricts God’s ability to change his mind; authentication, which tests the validity of revelations; and access rules which privilege political elites as recipients of God’s word.


The Anti-Competitive Music Industry And The Case For Compulsory Licensing In The Digital Distribution Of Music, Ankur Srivastava 2014 Touro College Jacob D. Fuchsberg Law Center

The Anti-Competitive Music Industry And The Case For Compulsory Licensing In The Digital Distribution Of Music, Ankur Srivastava

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Copyright Infringement Test: A New Approach To Literary Misappropriation In Film, Rikki Bahar 2014 Pace University

The Copyright Infringement Test: A New Approach To Literary Misappropriation In Film, Rikki Bahar

Pace Intellectual Property, Sports & Entertainment Law Forum

This Note argues that courts’ emphasis on the ordinary observer test to prove illicit copying in film is misguided. The ordinary observer test relies on whether the accused work captures the total feel of the copyrighted work, but overlooks an essential aspect of unlawful appropriation and copyright law – the idea that only particular elements of a work are copyrightable. If a jury is exposed to expert testimony regarding probative similarity before making their evaluation, it is unlikely they will forget such evidence when evaluating the illicit copying.

A better test for infringement would be one that allows the ordinary observer ...


Invalid Pre-Termination Grants And The Challenge To Obtain A Remedy, Samuel H. Jones 2014 SelectedWorks

Invalid Pre-Termination Grants And The Challenge To Obtain A Remedy, Samuel H. Jones

Samuel H Jones

The 1976 Copyright Act created what is now commonly known as the termination right, which allows authors to unilaterally terminate prior grants of their copyrights and reclaim ownership. This right was created, in large part, to liberate authors from unremunerative agreements previously entered into when the value of their copyrighted works had not yet been realized. It can be a powerful tool for authors to leverage more favorable agreements than they were previously able, particularly when those copyrights are highly valued. To ensure authors’ ability to exercise this right, Congress enacted provisions in the 1976 Copyright Act that prohibit authors ...


The Next Great Youtube: Improving Content Id To Foster Creativity, Cooperation, And Fair Compensation, Benjamin Boroughf 2014 SelectedWorks

The Next Great Youtube: Improving Content Id To Foster Creativity, Cooperation, And Fair Compensation, Benjamin Boroughf

Benjamin Boroughf

No abstract provided.


How Can Brands Flourish In The Knockoff Kingdom? What China Tells Us About The Bad – And Good – Effects Of Luxury Goods Counterfeiting, Kal Raustiala, Christopher Jon Sprigman 2014 NELLCO

How Can Brands Flourish In The Knockoff Kingdom? What China Tells Us About The Bad – And Good – Effects Of Luxury Goods Counterfeiting, Kal Raustiala, Christopher Jon Sprigman

New York University Law and Economics Working Papers

By many measures China is now the world’s largest market for luxury goods. At the same time, however, the Middle Kingdom remains the Knockoff Kingdom. The Chinese are great producers and consumers of counterfeit and copied goods, and efforts to curtail counterfeiting are a central focus of many Western firms and Western governments.

How did China become the world’s leader in luxury goods sales — a category that relies heavily on IP rights for its market value — while at the same time achieving unchallenged global dominance in “IP theft”? How can authentic luxury products, with their often-stratospheric prices, have ...


Friend Or Faux: The Trademark Counterfeiting Act's Inability To Stop The Sale Of Counterfeit Sporting Goods, Jennifer Riso 2014 SelectedWorks

Friend Or Faux: The Trademark Counterfeiting Act's Inability To Stop The Sale Of Counterfeit Sporting Goods, Jennifer Riso

Jennifer Riso

The demand for counterfeit sporting goods, such as jerseys and other apparel, is on the rise as the prices of authentic goods continue to increase. The Trademark Counterfeiting Act of 1984 criminalizes the import and sale of counterfeit goods, but is ineffective at addressing the demand side of counterfeit goods. This paper analyzes the history behind the Act and recommends ways to ensure that the act will stay relevant as technology makes it easier to purchase counterfeit goods.


The Transmit Clause Test: A Pragmatic Approach To A Contemporary Understanding Of The Ambiguity In The Copyright Act’S Transmit Clause, Samantha Tilipman 2014 SelectedWorks

The Transmit Clause Test: A Pragmatic Approach To A Contemporary Understanding Of The Ambiguity In The Copyright Act’S Transmit Clause, Samantha Tilipman

Samantha Tilipman

The 1976 Copyright Act was a response to development of new technology and an attempt to clarify copyright law to promote further investment in the burgeoning sphere of cable systems.[1] In drafting the provisions of the new Act, Congress created the “Transmit Clause,” a key passage nestled into the definition of “to perform or display a work ‘publicly.’”[2]The ambiguity of the Transmit Clause has led the circuits to interpret it differently leading to conflicting caselaw on opposite ends of the nation. The purpose of this note is to provide the Supreme Court of the United States and ...


A Mother Goose Guide To Legal Writing, Jessica Ronay 2014 SelectedWorks

A Mother Goose Guide To Legal Writing, Jessica Ronay

Jessica Ronay

An original substantive poem with footnotes and explanatory paragraphs that provides examples and explanations of legal writing rules, illustrates the nuances of legal writing, and untangles the challenging legal writing concepts for students, professors, scholars, and practitioners.


Decoding Bollywood’S Royalty-Sharing Conundrum, Pralika Jain 2014 SelectedWorks

Decoding Bollywood’S Royalty-Sharing Conundrum, Pralika Jain

Pralika Jain

India’s film making community and business got „industry‟ status only in 2011. However, unlike major industries such as telecom and pharmaceutical, the film industry (popularly known as “Bollywood”) is characterised by a major lack of legal rules and institutions to administer them, the problem being most acute in respect of artists. Consequently, the industry is governed completely by market forces whose successful players wield nearly all the bargaining power. It’s almost baffling that a film industry which is currently worlds second in terms of revenue is so thinly regulated.


New Models And Conflicts In The Interconnection And Delivery, Rob Frieden 2014 SelectedWorks

New Models And Conflicts In The Interconnection And Delivery, Rob Frieden

Rob Frieden

As the Internet has evolved and diversified, interconnection terms and conditions have changed between Internet Service Providers (“ISPs”). These carriers experiment with alternatives to conventional models that classify interconnection as either peering or transiting. The former typically involves interconnection between high capacity carriers whose transoceanic traffic volumes generally match thereby eliminating the need for a transfer of funds. Historically smaller carriers have paid transit fees to larger Tier-1 ISPs for the opportunity to secure upstream links throughout the Internet cloud.

With the growing availability of bandwidth intensive, video content carried via the Internet, traffic volume disparities have increased between ISPs ...


Taming The "Feral Beast": Cautionary Lessons From British Press Reform, Lili Levi 2014 University of Miami

Taming The "Feral Beast": Cautionary Lessons From British Press Reform, Lili Levi

Lili Levi

Abstract: As technology undermines the economic model supporting traditional newspapers, power shifts from the watchdog press to those it watches. Worldwide calls for increased press “responsibility” are one result. Pending British press reform provides a troubling example with far-ranging implications for freedom of the press. Under the guise of modest press self-regulation, the U.K. is currently poised to upend 300 years of press freedom via the recently-approved Royal Charter for Self-Regulation of the Press. The Royal Charter was adopted in response to the moral panic engendered by Britain’s tabloid phone-hacking scandal. An example of 20th Century regulation ...


Rauschenberg, Royalties, And Artists' Rights: Potential Droit De Suite Legislation In The United States, M. Elizabeth Petty 2014 College of William & Mary Law School

Rauschenberg, Royalties, And Artists' Rights: Potential Droit De Suite Legislation In The United States, M. Elizabeth Petty

William & Mary Bill of Rights Journal

No abstract provided.


N.I.G.G.A., Slumdog, Dyke, Jap, And Heeb: Reconsidering Disparaging Trademarks In A Post-Racial Era, Amanda E. Compton 2014 SelectedWorks

N.I.G.G.A., Slumdog, Dyke, Jap, And Heeb: Reconsidering Disparaging Trademarks In A Post-Racial Era, Amanda E. Compton

Amanda E. Compton

Currently registration of disparaging trademarks is prohibited under Section 2(a) of the Lanham Act. Recent events, however, should reinvigorate the debate about the protection and registration of disparaging marks: (1) recent decisions published by the Trademark Trial and Appeal Board (TTAB) that continue to address and highlight the issues surrounding the registration of disparaging marks; (2) a proposed federal act that would not only specifically bar the registration of any trademark that includes the word “redskins,” but would also retroactively cancel any existing registration that consist of or includes that term; and (3) an amendment to a state act ...


“Meet Me Halfway”: Arm Wrestling And The Law, Thomas M. Byron 2014 Pace University

“Meet Me Halfway”: Arm Wrestling And The Law, Thomas M. Byron

Pace Intellectual Property, Sports & Entertainment Law Forum

Most law review articles are very serious, and with good reason. They discuss important, world-changing matters like the role and magnitude of executive power, the limits of Constitutional rights, the boundaries of international law, and the vagaries of civil procedure. This Article has no such world-changing or reverent pretentions; it instead takes a light-hearted view of a fairly marginal legal topic: arm wrestling. To provide a spine for the discussion, the Article leans heavily on the 1980s movie Over the Top – a movie about arm wrestling, trucking, and child custody - to provide examples of arm wrestling content with legal implications ...


Don’T Get Slammed Into Nefer Nefer Land: Complaints In The Civil Forfeiture Of Cultural Property, Victoria A. Russell 2014 Pace University

Don’T Get Slammed Into Nefer Nefer Land: Complaints In The Civil Forfeiture Of Cultural Property, Victoria A. Russell

Pace Intellectual Property, Sports & Entertainment Law Forum

The Saint Louis Art Museum, known as SLAM, acquired the mask of Ka-Nefer-Nefer in 1998. Eight years later, the Egyptian Supreme Council of Antiquities called for its return on the grounds that it had been stolen from the Egyptian Museum in Cairo. SLAM refused. In 2011, the case went before the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Missouri to determine the ownership of the mask. Perhaps to the surprise of many, the court decided that the mask belongs in Saint Louis.

This Article will explain how this case was properly decided, albeit on a legal technicality. It ...


New York’S Taxable Lap Dancing …At A Strip Club Near You!, Harvey Gilmore 2014 Pace University

New York’S Taxable Lap Dancing …At A Strip Club Near You!, Harvey Gilmore

Pace Intellectual Property, Sports & Entertainment Law Forum

In today’s difficult economic times, state governments are more hard pressed than ever to come up with new sources of revenue to at least stay revenue neutral. Leave it to the perpetually money-hungry State of New York to come up with this gem of an idea for generating tax revenues: In 2005, the New York State Department of Taxation and Finance attempted to impose sales tax on a nightclub’s offering of exotic dancing to its customers. This resulted in one nightclub instigating a legal challenge to the state’s attempt to impose sales taxes on exotic dancing. This ...


Pace Intellectual Property, Sports & Entertainment Law Forum, Volume 4, Issue 1, Winter 2014, 2014 Pace University

Pace Intellectual Property, Sports & Entertainment Law Forum, Volume 4, Issue 1, Winter 2014

Pace Intellectual Property, Sports & Entertainment Law Forum

Thank you for downloading the first digital edition of the Pace Intellectual Property, Sports & Entertainment Law Forum. As you scroll through the pages of this issue, you may notice the Forum has a new look. Recognizing the significant advancements in technology that have revolutionized the legal field in the past few years, the Volume 4 Editorial Board sought to update and adapt the Forum to be accessible digitally, formatting the issue for tablets and e-readers. As you read, take advantage of clickable Tables of Contents and links to online sources throughout the issue.


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