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Work Made For Hire – Analyzing The Multifactor Balancing Test, Ryan G. Vacca 2015 The University of Akron School of Law

Work Made For Hire – Analyzing The Multifactor Balancing Test, Ryan G. Vacca

Ryan G. Vacca

Authorship, and hence, initial ownership of copyrighted works is oftentimes controlled by the 1976 Copyright Act’s work made for hire doctrine. This doctrine states that works created by employees within the scope of their employment result in the employer owning the copyright. One key determination in this analysis is whether the hired party is an employee or independent contractor. In 1989, the U.S. Supreme Court, in CCNV v. Reid, answered the question of how employees are distinguished from independent contractors by setting forth a list of factors courts should consider. Unfortunately, the Supreme Court did not give further ...


Silent Similarity, Jessica Litman 2015 SelectedWorks

Silent Similarity, Jessica Litman

Jessica Litman

From 1909 to 1930, U.S. courts grappled with claims by authors of prose works claiming that works in a new art form -- silent movies -- had infringed their copyrights. These cases laid the groundwork for much of modern copyright law, from their broad expansion of the reproduction right, to their puzzled grappling with the question how to compare works in dissimilar media, to their confusion over what sort of evidence should be relevant to show copyrightability, copying and infringement. Some of those cases – in particular, Nichols v. Universal Pictures – are canonical today. They are not, however, well-understood. In particular, the ...


Copyright And The Tragedy Of The Common, Tracy Reilly 2014 SelectedWorks

Copyright And The Tragedy Of The Common, Tracy Reilly

Tracy L Reilly

In his 1968 article, The Tragedy of the Commons, biologist Garret Hardin first described his theory on the ecological unsustainability of collective human behavior, claiming that commonly held real property interests would not ultimately be supportable due to the competing individual interests of all who use the property. In the legal field, Hardin’s article is frequently cited to support various theories related to real property and environmental law issues such as ownership, redistribution of wealth, pollution, over population, and global warming. Most scholars claim that a tragedy of the commons does not exist in intellectual property-related goods due to ...


Linking To Liability: When Linking To Leaked Films, Scripts, And Television Shows Is Copyright Infringement,, Kimberlianne Podlas 2014 SelectedWorks

Linking To Liability: When Linking To Leaked Films, Scripts, And Television Shows Is Copyright Infringement,, Kimberlianne Podlas

Kimberlianne Podlas

This article examines the problem of movies, scripts, and other entertainment works being leaked online, and whether news and fan sites that link to such works are liable for copyright infringement. In the past few months alone, The Expendables 3, next week’s Doctor Who Series 8 premier, and Quentin Tarantino’s The Hateful Eight screenplay have all been leaked online. Internet leaks are uniquely problematic, as it is often not possible to identify the source of leak, traditional contract and tort remedies may not apply, or the greatest harm may be due to third parties’ linking to the work ...


The Costs And Benefits Of Regulatory Intervention In Internet Service Provider Interconnection Disputes: Lessons From Broadcaster-Cable Retransmission Consent Negotiations, Rob Frieden 2014 SelectedWorks

The Costs And Benefits Of Regulatory Intervention In Internet Service Provider Interconnection Disputes: Lessons From Broadcaster-Cable Retransmission Consent Negotiations, Rob Frieden

Rob Frieden

This paper considers what limited roles the FCC may lawfully assume to ensure timely and fair interconnection and compensation agreements in the Internet ecosystem. The paper examines the FCC’s limited role in broadcaster-cable television retransmission consent negotiations with an eye toward assessing the applicability of this model. The FCC explicitly states that it lacks jurisdiction to prescribe terms, or to mandate binding arbitration. However, it recently interpreted its statutory authority to ensure “good faith” negotiations as allowing it to constrain broadcaster negotiating leverage by prohibiting multiple operators, having the largest market share, from joining in collective negotiations with cable ...


Internet Protocol Television And The Challenge Of “Mission Critical” Bits., Rob Frieden 2014 SelectedWorks

Internet Protocol Television And The Challenge Of “Mission Critical” Bits., Rob Frieden

Rob Frieden

The Internet increasingly provides an alternative distribution medium for video and other types of high value, bandwidth intensive content. Many consumers have become “technology agnostic” about what kind of wireline or wireless medium provides service. However, they expect carriers to offer access anytime, anywhere, via any device and in any format. These early adopters of new technologies and alternatives to “legacy” media have no patience with the concept of “appointment television” that limits access to a specific time, on a single channel and in only one presentation format.

This paper assesses whether and how Internet Service Providers (“ISPs”) can offer ...


A European Solution To America’S Basketball Problem: Reforming Amateur Basketball In The United States, Jaimie K. McFarlin, Joshua Lee 2014 SelectedWorks

A European Solution To America’S Basketball Problem: Reforming Amateur Basketball In The United States, Jaimie K. Mcfarlin, Joshua Lee

Jaimie K. McFarlin

The system of amateur and collegiate basketball in America is flawed, as every year, thousands of young men and women pursue their basketball dreams under the shadow of a multi-million dollar, predatory business model. Integral to telling the history of the NCAA and AAU organizations are recruiting horror stories and other examples of young talents who were taken advantage of by unscrupulous actors, both of which continue today. The commercialization and professionalization of amateur basketball has fed an ecosystem of exploitation in which private actors and institutions capitalize on the American mantra of "amateurism." The European system of amateur athletics ...


Reforming Copyright Interpretation, Zahr K. Said 2014 SelectedWorks

Reforming Copyright Interpretation, Zahr K. Said

Zahr K Said

This Article argues that copyright law needs to acknowledge and reform its interpretive choice regime. Even though judges face potentially outcome-determinative choices among competing sources of interpretive authority when they adjudicate copyrightable works, their selection of interpretive methods has been almost entirely overlooked by scholars and judges alike. This selection among competing interpretive methods demands that judges choose where to locate their own authority: in the work itself; in the context around the work, including its reception, or in the author’s intentions; in expert opinions; or in judicial intuition. Copyright’s interpretive choice regime controls questions of major importance ...


The Narrowest And Most Obvious Limits: Applying Fair Use To Appropriation Art Economically Using A Royalty System, Brittani Everson 2014 The Catholic University of America, Columbus School of Law

The Narrowest And Most Obvious Limits: Applying Fair Use To Appropriation Art Economically Using A Royalty System, Brittani Everson

Catholic University Law Review

No abstract provided.


“Can I Profit From My Own Name And Likeness As A College Athlete?” The Predictive Legal Analytics Of A College Player’S Publicity Rights Vs. First Amendment Rights Of Others, Roger M. Groves 2014 Florida Coastal School of Law

“Can I Profit From My Own Name And Likeness As A College Athlete?” The Predictive Legal Analytics Of A College Player’S Publicity Rights Vs. First Amendment Rights Of Others, Roger M. Groves

Roger M. Groves

Two federal court decisions during 2013 have changed the game for college students versus the schools, the NCAA and video game makers. This article explores whether for the first time in history these athletes can profit from their own name and likeness and prevent others from doing so.

But those cases still leave many untested applications to new facts – facts that the courts have not faced. Particularly intriguing is how 21st Century technology will apply to this area in future litigation. No publicity rights case or article to date has explored the application of predictive analytics, computer programs, algorithms ...


The Political Function Of Revelation: Lessons From The Hebrew Bible, Geoffrey P. Miller 2014 NELLCO

The Political Function Of Revelation: Lessons From The Hebrew Bible, Geoffrey P. Miller

New York University Public Law and Legal Theory Working Papers

This article examines the political theory of revelation in the narratives of the Hebrew Bible, particularly the theophany at Sinai. Revelation occurs when God communicates information to human beings. The biblical narratives use the modality of a revelation to signal the importance of the message being conveyed. They also identify techniques for limiting revelation’s destabilizing potential: embedding, which restricts God’s ability to change his mind; authentication, which tests the validity of revelations; and access rules which privilege political elites as recipients of God’s word.


The Anti-Competitive Music Industry And The Case For Compulsory Licensing In The Digital Distribution Of Music, Ankur Srivastava 2014 Touro College Jacob D. Fuchsberg Law Center

The Anti-Competitive Music Industry And The Case For Compulsory Licensing In The Digital Distribution Of Music, Ankur Srivastava

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Copyright Infringement Test: A New Approach To Literary Misappropriation In Film, Rikki Bahar 2014 Pace University

The Copyright Infringement Test: A New Approach To Literary Misappropriation In Film, Rikki Bahar

Pace Intellectual Property, Sports & Entertainment Law Forum

This Note argues that courts’ emphasis on the ordinary observer test to prove illicit copying in film is misguided. The ordinary observer test relies on whether the accused work captures the total feel of the copyrighted work, but overlooks an essential aspect of unlawful appropriation and copyright law – the idea that only particular elements of a work are copyrightable. If a jury is exposed to expert testimony regarding probative similarity before making their evaluation, it is unlikely they will forget such evidence when evaluating the illicit copying.

A better test for infringement would be one that allows the ordinary observer ...


Invalid Pre-Termination Grants And The Challenge To Obtain A Remedy, Samuel H. Jones 2014 SelectedWorks

Invalid Pre-Termination Grants And The Challenge To Obtain A Remedy, Samuel H. Jones

Samuel H Jones

The 1976 Copyright Act created what is now commonly known as the termination right, which allows authors to unilaterally terminate prior grants of their copyrights and reclaim ownership. This right was created, in large part, to liberate authors from unremunerative agreements previously entered into when the value of their copyrighted works had not yet been realized. It can be a powerful tool for authors to leverage more favorable agreements than they were previously able, particularly when those copyrights are highly valued. To ensure authors’ ability to exercise this right, Congress enacted provisions in the 1976 Copyright Act that prohibit authors ...


How Can Brands Flourish In The Knockoff Kingdom? What China Tells Us About The Bad – And Good – Effects Of Luxury Goods Counterfeiting, Kal Raustiala, Christopher Jon Sprigman 2014 NELLCO

How Can Brands Flourish In The Knockoff Kingdom? What China Tells Us About The Bad – And Good – Effects Of Luxury Goods Counterfeiting, Kal Raustiala, Christopher Jon Sprigman

New York University Law and Economics Working Papers

By many measures China is now the world’s largest market for luxury goods. At the same time, however, the Middle Kingdom remains the Knockoff Kingdom. The Chinese are great producers and consumers of counterfeit and copied goods, and efforts to curtail counterfeiting are a central focus of many Western firms and Western governments.

How did China become the world’s leader in luxury goods sales — a category that relies heavily on IP rights for its market value — while at the same time achieving unchallenged global dominance in “IP theft”? How can authentic luxury products, with their often-stratospheric prices, have ...


The Next Great Youtube: Improving Content Id To Foster Creativity, Cooperation, And Fair Compensation, Benjamin Boroughf 2014 SelectedWorks

The Next Great Youtube: Improving Content Id To Foster Creativity, Cooperation, And Fair Compensation, Benjamin Boroughf

Benjamin Boroughf

YouTube prides itself on its automatic copyright detection and filtering program known as Content ID because it goes beyond YouTube’s legal responsibilities under the Digital Millennium Copyright Act and because it allows copyright holders to control and profit from their content. However, Content ID is not the technological paragon YouTube and some scholars see it as. By relying on a system that automatically matches, blocks, and monetizes videos that allegedly contain any amount of infringing content, both YouTube and copyright holders have promoted a system that opposes the Copyright Act and YouTube’s goals of promoting creativity and protecting ...


Friend Or Faux: The Trademark Counterfeiting Act's Inability To Stop The Sale Of Counterfeit Sporting Goods, Jennifer Riso 2014 SelectedWorks

Friend Or Faux: The Trademark Counterfeiting Act's Inability To Stop The Sale Of Counterfeit Sporting Goods, Jennifer Riso

Jennifer Riso

The demand for counterfeit sporting goods, such as jerseys and other apparel, is on the rise as the prices of authentic goods continue to increase. The Trademark Counterfeiting Act of 1984 criminalizes the import and sale of counterfeit goods, but is ineffective at addressing the demand side of counterfeit goods. This paper analyzes the history behind the Act and recommends ways to ensure that the act will stay relevant as technology makes it easier to purchase counterfeit goods.


The Transmit Clause Test: A Pragmatic Approach To A Contemporary Understanding Of The Ambiguity In The Copyright Act’S Transmit Clause, Samantha Tilipman 2014 SelectedWorks

The Transmit Clause Test: A Pragmatic Approach To A Contemporary Understanding Of The Ambiguity In The Copyright Act’S Transmit Clause, Samantha Tilipman

Samantha Tilipman

The 1976 Copyright Act was a response to development of new technology and an attempt to clarify copyright law to promote further investment in the burgeoning sphere of cable systems.[1] In drafting the provisions of the new Act, Congress created the “Transmit Clause,” a key passage nestled into the definition of “to perform or display a work ‘publicly.’”[2]The ambiguity of the Transmit Clause has led the circuits to interpret it differently leading to conflicting caselaw on opposite ends of the nation. The purpose of this note is to provide the Supreme Court of the United States and ...


A Mother Goose Guide To Legal Writing, Jessica Ronay 2014 SelectedWorks

A Mother Goose Guide To Legal Writing, Jessica Ronay

Jessica Ronay

An original substantive poem with footnotes and explanatory paragraphs that provides examples and explanations of legal writing rules, illustrates the nuances of legal writing, and untangles the challenging legal writing concepts for students, professors, scholars, and practitioners.


Decoding Bollywood’S Royalty-Sharing Conundrum, Pralika Jain 2014 SelectedWorks

Decoding Bollywood’S Royalty-Sharing Conundrum, Pralika Jain

Pralika Jain

India’s film making community and business got „industry‟ status only in 2011. However, unlike major industries such as telecom and pharmaceutical, the film industry (popularly known as “Bollywood”) is characterised by a major lack of legal rules and institutions to administer them, the problem being most acute in respect of artists. Consequently, the industry is governed completely by market forces whose successful players wield nearly all the bargaining power. It’s almost baffling that a film industry which is currently worlds second in terms of revenue is so thinly regulated.


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