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Lowering Legal Barriers To Rpki Adoption, Christopher S. Yoo, David A. Wishnick 2019 University of Pennsylvania Law School

Lowering Legal Barriers To Rpki Adoption, Christopher S. Yoo, David A. Wishnick

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

Across the Internet, mistaken and malicious routing announcements impose significant costs on users and network operators. To make routing announcements more reliable and secure, Internet coordination bodies have encouraged network operators to adopt the Resource Public Key Infrastructure (“RPKI”) framework. Despite this encouragement, RPKI’s adoption rates are low, especially in North America.

This report presents the results of a year-long investigation into the hypothesis—widespread within the network operator community—that legal issues pose barriers to RPKI adoption and are one cause of the disparities between North America and other regions of the world. On the basis of interviews ...


Wildearth Guardians V. United States Bureau Of Land Management, Seth Sivinski 2019 University of Montana School of Law

Wildearth Guardians V. United States Bureau Of Land Management, Seth Sivinski

Public Land & Resources Law Review

In WildEarth Guardians v. U.S. BLM, the District Court of Colorado showed that economic and developmental uncertainty is an area where agencies are given broad discretion in deciding whether an impact is reasonably foreseeable and requires a further conformity analysis under the Clean Air Act. This case exemplifies the tactical limitation of using climate change and the science around it to force greater analysis of projects undertaken by federal agencies. However, the court presented a potential roadmap for successful future challenges.


Predictability For Privacy In Data Driven Government, Jordan Blanke, Janine Hiller 2019 Mercer University

Predictability For Privacy In Data Driven Government, Jordan Blanke, Janine Hiller

Minnesota Journal of Law, Science & Technology

No abstract provided.


Deepfakes: False Pornography Is Here And The Law Cannot Protect You, Douglas Harris 2019 Duke Law

Deepfakes: False Pornography Is Here And The Law Cannot Protect You, Douglas Harris

Duke Law & Technology Review

It is now possible for anyone with rudimentary computer skills to create a pornographic deepfake portraying an individual engaging in a sex act that never actually occurred. These realistic videos, called “deepfakes,” use artificial intelligence software to impose a person’s face onto another person’s body. While pornographic deepfakes were first created to produce videos of celebrities, they are now being generated to feature other nonconsenting individuals—like a friend or a classmate. This Article argues that several tort doctrines and recent non-consensual pornography laws are unable to handle published deepfakes of non-celebrities. Instead, a federal criminal statute prohibiting ...


Solenex Llc V. Jewell, F. Aaron Rains 2019 Alexander Blewett III School of Law at the University of Montana

Solenex Llc V. Jewell, F. Aaron Rains

Public Land & Resources Law Review

In Solenex LLC v. Jewell, the Secretary of the Interior cancelled a highly contentious oil and gas lease in Montana’s Badger-Two Medicine area, an environmentally sensitive and culturally significant area to the Blackfeet Tribe, nearly thirty years after the lease had been issued. Solenex, a Louisiana based oil and gas company and holder of the lease, brought this action to enjoin the cancellation. The District Court for the District of Columbia agreed with Solenex and found that the Secretary’s decision took an unreasonable amount of time and violated good-faith contractual obligations. On these grounds, the court found the ...


Why Do Startups Use Trade Secrets?, David S. Levine, Ted Sichelman 2019 Elon University School of Law

Why Do Startups Use Trade Secrets?, David S. Levine, Ted Sichelman

Notre Dame Law Review

Empirical studies of the use of trade secrecy are scant, and those focusing on startups, nonexistent. In this Article, we present the first set of data—drawn from the Berkeley Patent Survey—on the use of trade secrets by U.S. startup companies in the software, biotechnology, medical device, and hardware industries. Specifically, we report on the prevalence of trade secrecy usage among startups. Additionally, we assess the importance of trade secrets in relation to other forms of intellectual property protection and barriers to entry, such as patents, copyrights, firstmover advantage, and complementary assets. We segment these results by a ...


Finding Prejudice From Lost Esi: An Analysis Of Courts’ Standards Under Amended Federal Rule Of Civil Procedure 37(E), Thomas J. Joyce 2019 University of Oklahoma College of Law

Finding Prejudice From Lost Esi: An Analysis Of Courts’ Standards Under Amended Federal Rule Of Civil Procedure 37(E), Thomas J. Joyce

Oklahoma Law Review

No abstract provided.


Technology Transfer And The Trips Agreement Are Developed Countries Meeting Their End Of The Bargain?, David M. Fox 2019 University of California, Hastings College of the Law

Technology Transfer And The Trips Agreement Are Developed Countries Meeting Their End Of The Bargain?, David M. Fox

Hastings Science and Technology Law Journal

International trade agreements often integrate provisions requiring the transfer of technology from developed to least-developed countries under the assumption that technological development in the world’s poorest countries will help solve pressing global concerns. At first, supplying tangible hardware and equipment to least-developed countries satisfied these trade obligations. Today, however, modern development theory calls for a broader understanding of “technology” to include knowledge, skills, and human resource development. Article 66.2 of the TRIPS Agreement instructs developed country Members to incentivize domestic enterprises and institutions “for the purpose of promoting and encouraging technology transfer to least-developed country Members.” Least-developed countries ...


Defusing A Ticking Time Bomb: The Complicated Considerations Underlying Compulsory Human Genetic Editing, Grant Hayes Frazier 2019 University of California, Hastings College of the Law

Defusing A Ticking Time Bomb: The Complicated Considerations Underlying Compulsory Human Genetic Editing, Grant Hayes Frazier

Hastings Science and Technology Law Journal

Gene editing is a type of genetic engineering that enables scientists to change an organism’s DNA by adding, removing, or altering genetic material at particular locations in the human genome. While these editing technologies are in their infancy, they hold great promise for future applications. They also raise many moral, ethical, and legal questions.

Fast forward 10 years. In utero gene editing is effective, safe, and inexpensive (or covered by insurance). A couple with strong religious views against gene editing decides to procreate despite knowing, via family history, they are both homozygous dominant for the allele that causes Huntington ...


Cryptocurrency And The § 1031 Like Kind Exchange, Eli Cole 2019 University of California, Hastings College of the Law

Cryptocurrency And The § 1031 Like Kind Exchange, Eli Cole

Hastings Science and Technology Law Journal

Cryptocurrency has been called “a fraud” by some and “the next internet” by others. However, since the first Bitcoin was mined in 2009, the growth of the cryptocurrency market capitalization has been exponential—surpassing $800 billion at the beginning of 2018. Not surprisingly, the regulations governing these digital pieces of property have lagged the economic growth. In this Article, I attempt to answer the question: should 26 U.S.C. § 1031 apply to an exchange between cryptocurrencies?

This Article argues that the Internal Revenue Service’s decision to classify cryptocurrency as property, combined with the Securities and Exchange Commission’s ...


Bitcoin, Virtual Currencies, And The Struggle Of Law And Regulation To Keep Pace, 2019 Marquette University Law School

Bitcoin, Virtual Currencies, And The Struggle Of Law And Regulation To Keep Pace

Marquette Law Review

At less than a decade old, Bitcoin and other virtual currencies have had a major societal impact, and proven to be a unique payment systems challenge for law enforcement, financial regulatory authorities worldwide, and the investment community. Rapid introduction and diffusion of technological changes throughout society, such as the blockchain that serves as Bitcoin’s crypto-foundation, continue to exceed the ability of law and regulation to keep pace. During 2017 alone, the market price of Bitcoin rose 1,735%, from about $970 to $14,292, causing an investor feeding frenzy. As of September 11, 2018, a total of 1,935 ...


Commuting To Mars: A Response To Professors Abraham And Rabin, Ryan Calo 2019 University of Washington School of Law

Commuting To Mars: A Response To Professors Abraham And Rabin, Ryan Calo

Articles

The remarks that follow are less about the particular wisdom of manufacturer enterprise responsibility (MER) for driverless cars, and more about the limits of legal scholarship in grappling with unfolding technologic change. The contingency of technology and its social impacts caution against sweeping interventions. And the role of law and technology scholarship—as opposed to legal scholarship that touches upon technology—is arguably to recognize the unique challenges that arise at this intersection.


Tc Heartland: It’S Time To Take Stock, Daniel Kazhdan, Sanjiv P. Laud 2019 Jones Day

Tc Heartland: It’S Time To Take Stock, Daniel Kazhdan, Sanjiv P. Laud

IP Theory

It has been a little over a year and a half since the Supreme Court issued its groundbreaking venue decision in TC Heartland LLC v. Kraft Foods Group Brands LLC, shaking up the status quo in U.S. patent infringement litigation. The first months after TC Heartland saw a flurry of activity as litigants and courts wrestled with the impact of the decision on pending cases, pondered the true meaning of a “regular and established place of business,” and explored many other questions left by the TC Heartland decision. Eighteen months and several writs of mandamus later, it is now ...


The Invention Secrecy Act: The Uspto As A Gatekeeper Of National Security, Scott Locke 2019 Dorf & Nelson LLP

The Invention Secrecy Act: The Uspto As A Gatekeeper Of National Security, Scott Locke

IP Theory

The United States Patent and Trademark Office (“USPTO”) has the privilege of reviewing hundreds of thousands of inventions each year before the public learns about them. Consequently, the USPTO is uniquely positioned as a funnel through which the Government can collect information about new technologies and determine which ones have implications for the safety and welfare of the nation. Under the Invention Secrecy Act, the Commissioner for Patents may order that an invention for which patent protection is sought be kept secret if disclosure of the invention might be detrimental to national security.

In order for the USPTO to review ...


Digital Market Perfection, Rory Van Loo 2019 Boston Univeristy School of Law

Digital Market Perfection, Rory Van Loo

Faculty Scholarship

Google’s, Apple’s, and other companies’ automated assistants are increasingly serving as personal shoppers. These digital intermediaries will save us time by purchasing grocery items, transferring bank accounts, and subscribing to cable. The literature has only begun to hint at the paradigm shift needed to navigate the legal risks and rewards of this coming era of automated commerce. This Article begins to fill that gap first by surveying legal battles related to contract exit, data access, and deception that will determine the extent to which automated assistants are able to help consumers to search and switch, potentially bringing tremendous ...


Robot Criminals, Ying Hu 2019 National University of Singapore

Robot Criminals, Ying Hu

University of Michigan Journal of Law Reform

When a robot harms humans, are there any grounds for holding it criminally liable for its misconduct? Yes, provided that the robot is capable of making, acting on, and communicating the reasons behind its moral decisions. If such a robot fails to observe the minimum moral standards that society requires of it, labeling it as a criminal can effectively fulfill criminal law’s function of censuring wrongful conduct and alleviating the emotional harm that may be inflicted on human victims.

Imposing criminal liability on robots does not absolve robot manufacturers, trainers, or owners of their individual criminal liability. The former ...


The Uncertain Protection Of "Derivative" Trade Secrets, 18 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 241 (2019), Benjamin Bradford, Remi Jaffre 2019 John Marshall Law School

The Uncertain Protection Of "Derivative" Trade Secrets, 18 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 241 (2019), Benjamin Bradford, Remi Jaffre

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

This article discusses when a trade secret misappropriation claim can be premised on the acquisition, disclosure, or use of a product or method derived from a trade secret, rather than the acquisition, disclosure, or use of a trade secret itself. Although this question is likely to take on increasing importance as digital products that were made through the use of trade secrets and that can easily be copied become a larger part of everyday life, courts have rarely focused on it and have not come to any consensus. In this article, we survey the existing, inconsistent case law and analyze ...


Intersection Of Antitrust Laws With Evolving Frand Terms In Standard Essential Patent Disputes, 18 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 259 (2019), Claire Guo 2019 John Marshall Law School

Intersection Of Antitrust Laws With Evolving Frand Terms In Standard Essential Patent Disputes, 18 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 259 (2019), Claire Guo

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

This article addresses the issues of overlapping enforcement of antitrust laws and FRAND (Fair, reasonable and non-discriminatory terms) in standard essential disputes. Briefly, this article observes that the evolving FRAND terms will affect the degree that antitrust laws may intervene into SEP license practice. Part I of this article is a brief introduction to the background and main sections. Part II describes the evolvement of FRAND into a globally converged standard of royalty determination and a process through joint efforts of global courts. Part III discusses the changing interaction of FRAND with antitrust laws in three major jurisdictions, respectively China ...


Nationalizing Trips: An Examination Through Exceptions, 18 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 285 (2019), Evan Tallmadge 2019 John Marshall Law School

Nationalizing Trips: An Examination Through Exceptions, 18 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 285 (2019), Evan Tallmadge

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

What should not be patentable? The Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (“TRIPS”) codifies certain categories of subject matter that nations can exclude from patent protection. This Article examines how nations have interpreted these exclusions through an analysis of their national manuals of patent examining procedure and more importantly what explicit exceptions to patentability these countries have listed. The Article proceeds to analyze both the similarities and differences in approaches towards exclusions that attempt to ban the same subject matter from patentability and differences in what countries have chosen to bar from patenting. The Article concludes with an ...


The Golden Claims: Necessary Support For Nonprovisional Application Prior Art References To Be Granted Provisional Application Filing Dates During Inter Partes Review Proceedings, 18 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 326 (2019), Madison Makeever 2019 John Marshall Law School

The Golden Claims: Necessary Support For Nonprovisional Application Prior Art References To Be Granted Provisional Application Filing Dates During Inter Partes Review Proceedings, 18 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 326 (2019), Madison Makeever

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

Whether to beat an impending disclosure, disclose the most information possible, or simply to get the earliest possible filing date, provisional patent applications are a beneficial way to protect your patent rights. The few formal and statutory requirements allow provisionals to be prepared on a rush basis. The Federal Circuit held in 2017 that published nonprovisional applications can constitute prior art as of its provisional filing date but only as to elements in the application. However, ambiguity regarding published applications in the Federal Circuit’s 2015 precedent for awarding a patent it’s provisional filing date may lead to increased ...


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