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Google Analytics: Analyzing The Latest Wave Of Legal Concerns For Google In The U.S. And The E.U., 7 Buff. Intell. Prop. L.J. 135 (2010), Raizel Liebler, Keidra Chaney 2017 Selected Works

Google Analytics: Analyzing The Latest Wave Of Legal Concerns For Google In The U.S. And The E.U., 7 Buff. Intell. Prop. L.J. 135 (2010), Raizel Liebler, Keidra Chaney

Keidra Chaney

The next wave of concern regarding Google involves web analytics. Web analytics is the measurement, collection, analysis, and reporting of Internet data for the purposes of understanding and optimizing web usage. The concerns of web analytics use touches on issues of online user privacy, government use of personal information, and information on website user activity. While Google Analytics is not the sole web analytics product on the market, it is widely used by corporate, non-profit, and government organizations. The product has been reported to have a 59% market share among web analytics vendors in a 2008 study. Web analytics technology ...


Flying Under The Radar: Low-Altitude Local Drone Use And The Reentry Of Property Rights, Kenneth Maher 2017 Duke Law

Flying Under The Radar: Low-Altitude Local Drone Use And The Reentry Of Property Rights, Kenneth Maher

Duke Law & Technology Review

The characteristics and capabilities of civilian drones have proliferated in recent years, giving rise to a burgeoning industry. The popular media and academic literature have predominantly focused on privacy concerns, devoting considerably less attention to the regulatory challenges created by the new technology. Congress instructed the FAA to integrate drones into the National Airspace System in 2012, but rulemaking delays and a moratorium on commercial uses hampered the industry and withheld benefits from the public. Final regulations are now in place, but the new rules revive legal uncertainty over the constitutional limits of federal authority and the ambiguous vertical bounds ...


Drones And Privacy In The Golden State, Brandon Gonzalez 2017 Santa Clara Law

Drones And Privacy In The Golden State, Brandon Gonzalez

Santa Clara High Technology Law Journal

Drones and Privacy in the Golden State


3d-Printed Food, Jasper L. Tran 2017 George Mason University

3d-Printed Food, Jasper L. Tran

Jasper L. Tran

No abstract provided.


Managing Cyberthreat, Lawrence J. Trautman 2017 Santa Clara Law

Managing Cyberthreat, Lawrence J. Trautman

Santa Clara High Technology Law Journal

Managing Cyberthreat


"Through A Glass, Darkly" Technical, Policy, And Financial Actions To Avert The Coming Digital Dark Ages, Richard S. Whitt 2017 Santa Clara Law

"Through A Glass, Darkly" Technical, Policy, And Financial Actions To Avert The Coming Digital Dark Ages, Richard S. Whitt

Santa Clara High Technology Law Journal

"Through A Glass, Darkly" Technical, Policy, and Financial Actions to Avert the Coming Digital Dark Ages


Plausibility Under The Defend Trade Secrets Act, 16 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 188 (2017), Michelle Evans 2017 John Marshall Law School

Plausibility Under The Defend Trade Secrets Act, 16 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 188 (2017), Michelle Evans

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

With the recent passage of the Defend Trade Secrets Act (DTSA), a federal civil cause of action for trade secret misappropriation is now available. To add some familiarity to the Act, the drafters incorporated definitions similar to those of the Uniform Trade Secrets Act (UTSA). However, even though the provisions may seem familiar, there is a new requirement that is not obvious on the face of the statute- the plausibility requirement for pleading under the federal rules. To understand plausibility; however, one must understand the DTSA. Unfortunately, there is no guidance from the DTSA that can aid interpretation of the ...


Alice-Backed Securitization: Start-Ups’ New Alternative To Venture Capital, 16 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 246 (2017), Robert Laverty 2017 John Marshall Law School

Alice-Backed Securitization: Start-Ups’ New Alternative To Venture Capital, 16 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 246 (2017), Robert Laverty

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

As of 2016, the United States software industry added $1.07 trillion in total value to the U.S. economy alone. Today, it’s no mystery that high-tech solutions are embedded in the fabric of our world. Venture Capital has been the dominant source of funding for startup and midsize high-tech firms for the last two decades. However, Venture Capital funding comes at a hefty cost. Young developing high-tech firms are often forced to bargain large shares of their ownership and managerial control to receive the funding they need to realize their potential. But, what if high-tech firms didn’t ...


Blocking Ad Blockers, 16 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 272 (2017), Tyler Barbacovi 2017 John Marshall Law School

Blocking Ad Blockers, 16 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 272 (2017), Tyler Barbacovi

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

The prevalence of ad blocking software (software that prevents the loading of web based advertisements) is a growing problem for website owners and content creators who rely on advertising revenue to earn money. While the number of ad block users continues to increase, there has thus far been no significant legal challenge to ad blocking in the United States. This comment examines how a website owner, through a combination of technological improvements and the anti-circumvention provisions of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, could successfully raise a legal challenge against the purveyors of ad blocking software.


An Empirical Study Of Law Journal Copyright Practices, 16 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 207 (2017), Brian Frye, Christopher Ryan, Franklin Runge 2017 John Marshall Law School

An Empirical Study Of Law Journal Copyright Practices, 16 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 207 (2017), Brian Frye, Christopher Ryan, Franklin Runge

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

This article presents an empirical study of the copyright practices of American law journals in relation to copyright ownership and fair use, based on a 24-question survey. It concludes that many American law journals have adopted copyright policies that are inconsistent with the expectations of legal scholars and the scope of copyright protection. Specifically, many law journals have adopted copyright policies that effectively preclude open-access publishing, and unnecessarily limit the fair use of copyrighted works. In addition, it appears that some law journals may not understand their own copyright policies. This article proposes the creation of a Code of Copyright ...


Design Patent Litigation: Is "Obvious To Try" Unavailable For Validity Challenges Under 35 U.S.C. § 103?, 16 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 173 (2017), Scott Locke 2017 John Marshall Law School

Design Patent Litigation: Is "Obvious To Try" Unavailable For Validity Challenges Under 35 U.S.C. § 103?, 16 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 173 (2017), Scott Locke

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

Ten years ago, the United States Supreme Court shook the foundation of U.S. patent law when it announced that a patented invention could be invalidated because the claimed combination of heightened the thr whether a person of ordinary skill in the art would deem a combination of features obvious to try can be measured against a perceived a likelihood of success for achieving a purpose. But the concept does not easily translate to design patents. Those types of patents are directed to ornamental features, which by definition cannot be dictated by functionality, and thus, the success of a combination ...


Regulating Human Germline Modification In Light Of Crispr, Sarah Ashley Barnett 2017 University of Richmond

Regulating Human Germline Modification In Light Of Crispr, Sarah Ashley Barnett

Law Student Publications

This comment evaluates the United States‘ current regulatory scheme as it applies to CRISPR and related gene-modifying technologies and discusses the ethical ramifications of regulating human germline modification versus continuing to allow self-regulation within the scientific community. Part I explains what CRISPR is, how it works, and its impact on genetic engineering technology. Although CRISPR offers "unparalleled potential for modifying [both] human and nonhuman genomes," this comment focuses primarily on the use of CRISPR technology to manipulate the human germline. Part II discusses the social and bioethical implications of altering the human germline, including safety concerns, multigenerational consequences, equity issues ...


The European Union And The Outer Space Treaty: Will The Twain Ever Meet?, Frans G. von der Dunk 2017 University of Nebraska College of Law

The European Union And The Outer Space Treaty: Will The Twain Ever Meet?, Frans G. Von Der Dunk

Space, Cyber, and Telecommunications Law Program Faculty Publications

In spite of the envisaged Brexit and other crises and problems currently threatening the European Union (EU), that half-way house between a group of cooperating states and a single quasi-federal union of states remains an important player in today’s world, also – at least from a bird’s eye view – in terms of outer space. Its member states Germany and France have the largest space budgets of all European states (discounting the Russian Federation as a European state), and the European flagship projects Galileo and Copernicus, with the European Commission on behalf of the Union in the driver’s seat ...


Hybrid Transactions And The Internet Of Things: Goods, Services, Or Software?, Stacy-Ann Elvy 2017 New York Law School

Hybrid Transactions And The Internet Of Things: Goods, Services, Or Software?, Stacy-Ann Elvy

Washington and Lee Law Review

The Internet of Things (IOT) has been described by the American Bar Association as one of the fastest emerging, potentially most transformative and disruptive technological developments in recent years. The security risks posed by the IOT are immense and Article 2 of the UCC should play a central role in determinations regarding liability for vulnerable IOT products. However, the lack of explicit clarity in the UCC on how to evaluate Article 2’s applicability to hybrid transactions that involve the provision of goods, services, and software has led to conflicting case law on this issue, which contradicts the UCC’s ...


Dispersing The Cloud: Reaffirming The Right To Destroy In A New Era Of Digital Property, Daniel Martin 2017 Washington and Lee University School of Law

Dispersing The Cloud: Reaffirming The Right To Destroy In A New Era Of Digital Property, Daniel Martin

Washington and Lee Law Review

No abstract provided.


You Buy It, You Break It: A Comment On Dispersing The Cloud, Aaron Perzanowski 2017 Case Western University School of Law

You Buy It, You Break It: A Comment On Dispersing The Cloud, Aaron Perzanowski

Washington and Lee Law Review

No abstract provided.


Game Of Drones: Rolling The Dice With Unmanned Aerial Vehicles And Privacy, Rebecca L. Scharf 2017 University of Nevada, Las Vegas -- William S. Boyd School of Law

Game Of Drones: Rolling The Dice With Unmanned Aerial Vehicles And Privacy, Rebecca L. Scharf

Scholarly Works

This Article offers a practical three-part test for courts and law enforcement to utilize when faced with drone and privacy issues. Specifically addressing the question: how should courts analyze the Fourth Amendment’s protection against ‘unreasonable searches’ in the context of drones?

The Supreme Court’s Fourth Amendment jurisprudence produced an intricate framework to address issues arising out of the intersection of technology and privacy interests. In prominent decisions, including United States v. Katz, California v. Ciraolo, Kyllo v. United States, and most notably, United States v. Jones, the Court focused on whether the use of a single technology, such ...


Removing The Troll From The Thicket: The Case For Enhancing Patent Maintenance Fees In Relation To The Size Of A Patent Owner's Patent Portfolio, David S. Olson 2017 Boston College Law School

Removing The Troll From The Thicket: The Case For Enhancing Patent Maintenance Fees In Relation To The Size Of A Patent Owner's Patent Portfolio, David S. Olson

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

This Article proposes a novel solution to part of the problem that large patent portfolios can cause. Both so-called "patent trolls" and firms that commercialize the patents that they own can accumulate and then abuse large patent portfolios, even if most of the patents in the portfolio are of little value. Instead of suggesting reforms to better determine the value and boundaries of individual patents, as many others have already done, this Article proposes that the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (PTO) multiply the amount owed to keep a patent in force (patent maintenance fees) based on the size ...


Appetite For Destruction: Symbolic And Structural Facets Of The Right To Destroy Digital Property, Joshua A.T. Fairfield 2017 Washington and Lee University School of Law

Appetite For Destruction: Symbolic And Structural Facets Of The Right To Destroy Digital Property, Joshua A.T. Fairfield

Washington and Lee Law Review

No abstract provided.


3d Printing: What Could Happen To Products Liability When Users (And Everyone Else In Between) Become Manufacturers, James M. Beck, Matthew D. Jacobson 2017 University of Minnesota Law School

3d Printing: What Could Happen To Products Liability When Users (And Everyone Else In Between) Become Manufacturers, James M. Beck, Matthew D. Jacobson

Minnesota Journal of Law, Science & Technology

No abstract provided.


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