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Risk-Free Farming?, Bruce A. Babcock, Chad E. Hart 2015 Iowa State University

Risk-Free Farming?, Bruce A. Babcock, Chad E. Hart

Iowa Ag Review

The direction of U.S. farm policy changed with the passage of the 2002 farm bill and the 2000 Agricultural Risk Protection Act. Previous farm bills, together with the old crop insurance program, had gradually moved the crops sector toward greater market orientation, with farmers taking on more market risk in exchange for greater planting flexibility. But the beginning of this decade brought with it increased protection against both adverse price movements and crop losses. These policy changes were brought about largely at the behest of farm commodity organizations, who argued that they needed increased protection against the vagaries of ...


En El Do De La Unión Europea: Registro De Denominaciones De Origen Protegidas, Indicaciones Geográficas Protegidas, Etc. [2015/6], Luis González Vaqué, Cristina Vidreras Pérez 2015 Asociación Iberoamericana para el Dereho Alimentario

En El Do De La Unión Europea: Registro De Denominaciones De Origen Protegidas, Indicaciones Geográficas Protegidas, Etc. [2015/6], Luis González Vaqué, Cristina Vidreras Pérez

Luis González Vaqué

Para más información: mjfuster20@hotmail.com


Judging The Performance Of The 2002 Farm Bill, Bruce A. Babcock, Chad E. Hart 2015 Iowa State University

Judging The Performance Of The 2002 Farm Bill, Bruce A. Babcock, Chad E. Hart

Iowa Ag Review

The 2002 farm bill has been criticized from day one. Freetrade advocates criticized the significant increase in domestic subsidies for U.S. farmers at a time when the rest of the world was seemingly moving toward more liberalized production and trade. Small-farm advocates criticized the ability of large farms to bypass payment limitations through the use of commodity certificates. Conservation advocates thought they had accomplished a major feat with the Conservation Security Program, but implementation rules and subsequent funding cuts have shown that the program will have little short-term impact. And rural development advocates criticized the bill for its continued ...


It’S The End Of The Biological Patent World As We Know It, And Consumer Watchdog Feels Fine: How Consumer Watchdog Is Attempting To Kill The Future Of Horticultural Research, George R. Holton 2015 The George Washington University Law School

It’S The End Of The Biological Patent World As We Know It, And Consumer Watchdog Feels Fine: How Consumer Watchdog Is Attempting To Kill The Future Of Horticultural Research, George R. Holton

George R Holton

No abstract provided.


The New Acre Program: Frequently Asked Questions, Bruce A. Babcock, Chad E. Hart 2015 Iowa State University

The New Acre Program: Frequently Asked Questions, Bruce A. Babcock, Chad E. Hart

Iowa Ag Review

ACRE, which is an acronym for Average Crop Revenue Election, is a new commodity program included in the Food, Conservation and Energy Act of 2008 (the 2008 farm bill). Farmers can choose to participate in ACRE or they can continue to enroll in traditional commodity programs. ACRE is designed to provide revenue support to farmers as an alternative to the price support that farmers are used to receiving from commodity programs. Here, we answer some frequently asked questions about this new program.


Keynote Remarks: Re-Tooling Law And Legal Education For Food System Reform: Food Law And Policy In Practice, Emily M. Broad Leib 2015 Seattle University School of Law

Keynote Remarks: Re-Tooling Law And Legal Education For Food System Reform: Food Law And Policy In Practice, Emily M. Broad Leib

Seattle University Law Review

Thank you for the opportunity to be with you today and to take part in this symposium on the important role law schools and lawyers can play in changing our food system. Food preferences and food choices are incredibly personal, but the way we produce and consume food, and its impacts on our environment, public health, and the safety of ourselves and others, make it a pressing societal issue as well.


Re-Tooling Marine Food Supply Resilience In A Climate Change Era: Some Needed Reforms, Robin Kundis Craig 2015 Seattle University School of Law

Re-Tooling Marine Food Supply Resilience In A Climate Change Era: Some Needed Reforms, Robin Kundis Craig

Seattle University Law Review

Ocean fisheries and marine aquaculture are an important but often overlooked component of world food security. For example, of the seven billion (and counting) people on the planet, over one billion depend on fish as their primary source of protein, and fish is a primary source of protein (30 percent or more of protein consumed) in many countries around the world, including Japan, Greenland, Taiwan, Indonesia, several countries in Africa, and several South Pacific island nations. Marine fisheries and marine aquaculture have been subject to a number of stressors that can undermine world food security, including overfishing, habitat destruction, and ...


Scuttling Iuu Fishing And Rewarding Sustainable Fishing: Enhancing The Effectiveness Of The Port State Measures Agreement With Trade-Related Measures, Anastasia Telesetsky 2015 Seattle University School of Law

Scuttling Iuu Fishing And Rewarding Sustainable Fishing: Enhancing The Effectiveness Of The Port State Measures Agreement With Trade-Related Measures, Anastasia Telesetsky

Seattle University Law Review

Illegal, unreported, and unregulated fishing (IUU fishing) is a substantial threat to global food security and a recurring problem for global fishery managers already facing difficult baseline situations exacerbated by climate change, including warming oceans and increasing acidification. There is nothing historically new about IUU fishing; there have always been poachers who take advantage of operating in the shadows of legal commercial fishing. What is new is the extent to which marine poaching has industrialized. It is estimated that 19% of the worldwide value of marine catches are unlawful. The problem is not limited to developing states. For example, even ...


The Dangerous Right To Food Choice, Samuel R. Wiseman 2015 Seattle University School of Law

The Dangerous Right To Food Choice, Samuel R. Wiseman

Seattle University Law Review

Scholars, advocates, and interest groups have grown increasingly concerned with the ways in which government regulations—from agricultural subsidies to food safety regulations to licensing restrictions on food trucks—affect access to local food. One argument emerging from the interest in recent years is that choosing what foods to eat, what I have previously called “liberty of palate,” is a fundamental right. The attraction is obvious: infringements of fundamental rights trigger strict scrutiny, which few statutes survive. As argued elsewhere, the doctrinal case for the existence of such a right is very weak. This Essay does not revisit those arguments ...


Ag Gag Past, Present, And Future, Justin F. Marceau 2015 Seattle University School of Law

Ag Gag Past, Present, And Future, Justin F. Marceau

Seattle University Law Review

While the animal rights and food justice movements are relatively young, their political unpopularity has generated a steady onslaught of legislation designed to curtail their effectiveness. At each stage of their nascent development, these movements have confronted a new wave of criminal or civil sanctions carefully tailored to combat the previous successes the movements had achieved.


Opening The Barnyard Door: Transparency And The Resurgence Of Ag-Gag & Veggie Libel Laws, Nicole E. Negowetti 2015 Seattle University School of Law

Opening The Barnyard Door: Transparency And The Resurgence Of Ag-Gag & Veggie Libel Laws, Nicole E. Negowetti

Seattle University Law Review

Over the past several decades, as the agricultural system became increasingly industrialized and the steps from farm to plate multiplied, consumers became farther removed from the sources of their food. Until recently, most consumers in America were content to eat their processed, cheap, and filling foods without giving a second thought to how these foods were produced. The tides are changing. Increasingly, consumers are calling for more transparency in the food system. Repulsed by images of animal cruelty and shocked by unsavory food production practices, consumers want the food industry’s veil lifted and are demanding changes in food production ...


Pay No Attention To That Man Behind The Curtain: Concealment, Revelation, And The Question Of Food Safety, Denis W. Stearns 2015 Seattle University School of Law

Pay No Attention To That Man Behind The Curtain: Concealment, Revelation, And The Question Of Food Safety, Denis W. Stearns

Seattle University Law Review

Despite knowledge that commerce in food is a profit-driven enterprise, the public has consistently put great faith in the wholesomeness and safety of the food being purchased. To some extent, such faith is necessary, even if not always justified. In making the decision to put a bite of food in one’s own mouth, or the mouth of a friend or family member, a form of faith or trust must accompany the act of eating. For who would knowingly eat food suspected to be unsafe? But that is precisely what millions of people do every year, with a great many ...


Enhancing Biodiversity On Working Agricultural Lands Through Environmental Mitigation And Offsets: Opportunities In Australia And The Us, Matthew Roach 2015 Stanford University

Enhancing Biodiversity On Working Agricultural Lands Through Environmental Mitigation And Offsets: Opportunities In Australia And The Us, Matthew Roach

Matthew Roach

Australia has extensive experience in managing working agricultural lands to enhance biodiversity. State and Commonwealth agencies are increasingly using environmental offsets as a tool to manage the impacts of development. However, working agricultural lands are generally not considered a source of potential environmental offsets, as agencies prefer that land used for offsets be wholly set aside for environmental management purposes with limited or no agricultural activities. This contrasts with the United States, where efforts are underway to use working agricultural lands for mitigation.

This paper proposes that working agricultural lands can be used for environmental offsets under the Environment Protection ...


The 2014 Farm Bill: Farm Subsidies And Food Oppression, Andrea Freeman 2015 Seattle University School of Law

The 2014 Farm Bill: Farm Subsidies And Food Oppression, Andrea Freeman

Seattle University Law Review

The 2014 Farm Bill ushered in some significant and surprising changes. One of these was that it rendered the identity of all the recipients of farm subsidies secret. Representative Larry Combest, who is now a lobbyist for agribusiness, first introduced a secrecy provision into the bill in 2000. The provision, however, only applied to subsidies made in the form of crop insurance. Until 2014, the majority of subsidies were direct payments and the identity of the people who received them was public information. In fact, the Environmental Working Group’s release of the list of recipients led to a series ...


En El Do De La Unión Europea: Registro De Denominaciones De Origen Protegidas, Indicaciones Geográficas Protegidas, Etc. [2015/5], Luis González Vaqué, Cristina Vidreras Pérez 2015 Asociación Iberoamericana para el Dereho Alimentario

En El Do De La Unión Europea: Registro De Denominaciones De Origen Protegidas, Indicaciones Geográficas Protegidas, Etc. [2015/5], Luis González Vaqué, Cristina Vidreras Pérez

Luis González Vaqué

© 2015

Para más información: mjfuster20@hotmail.com


Agenda: Innovations In Managing Western Water: New Approaches For Balancing Environmental, Social, And Economic Outcomes, University of Colorado Boulder. Getches-Wilkinson Center for Natural Resources, Energy, and the Environment 2015 University of Colorado Law School

Agenda: Innovations In Managing Western Water: New Approaches For Balancing Environmental, Social, And Economic Outcomes, University Of Colorado Boulder. Getches-Wilkinson Center For Natural Resources, Energy, And The Environment

Innovations in Managing Western Water: New Approaches for Balancing Environmental, Social and Economic Outcomes (Martz Summer Conference, June 11-12)

Many aspects of western water allocation and management are the product of independent and uncoordinated actions, several occurring a century or more ago. However, in this modern era of water scarcity, it is increasingly acknowledged that more coordinated and deliberate decision-making is necessary for effectively balancing environmental, social, and economic objectives. In recent years, a variety of forums, processes, and tools have emerged to better manage the connections between regions, sectors, and publics linked by shared water systems. In this event, we explore the cutting edge efforts, the latest points of contention, and the opportunities for further progress.


En El Do De La Unión Europea: Registro De Denominaciones De Origen Protegidas, Indicaciones Geográficas Protegidas, Etc. [2015/4], Luis González Vaqué, Cristina Vidreras Pérez 2015 CEEUDECO

En El Do De La Unión Europea: Registro De Denominaciones De Origen Protegidas, Indicaciones Geográficas Protegidas, Etc. [2015/4], Luis González Vaqué, Cristina Vidreras Pérez

Luis González Vaqué

No abstract provided.


Water Quality Conflict Resolution And Agricultural Discharges: Lessons From Waterkeeper V. Hudson, Jennifer M. Egan, Joshua M. Duke 2015 College of William & Mary Law School

Water Quality Conflict Resolution And Agricultural Discharges: Lessons From Waterkeeper V. Hudson, Jennifer M. Egan, Joshua M. Duke

William & Mary Environmental Law and Policy Review

This Article presents a comparative institutional analysis of an increasingly important type of environmental conflict—the agricultural-waste-discharge and water-land-nexus conflict—using the recent citizen suit Waterkeeper v. Hudson as a case study. The objective is to assess the resource allocation efficiency and procedural fairness of the dispute processing in Hudson. The Hudson setting involves substantial scientific complexity, including ecological interdependencies, unobservable and observable land management decisions, pollutant transport, in-stream removal, and the problem of multiple and diverse sources of water quality pollution. Although the Hudson farm does fall under a regulated point source category in a state legislative definition, not ...


Regulatory Paradigms For Modern Breeding, Drew L. Kershen, Wayne A. Parrott 2015 University of Oklahoma College of Law

Regulatory Paradigms For Modern Breeding, Drew L. Kershen, Wayne A. Parrott

Drew L. Kershen

Modern breeding, based upon molecular biology using genetic information, has made rapid advances. Breeders using rDNA techniques properly can think of this technique as traditional biotechnology. Within the past ten years, breeders have begun to use newer techniques [site-directed nuclease techniques (SDNs), RNAi, and synthetic biology] to create and to develop plants and animals with desired genetic traits. In this chapter printed in the NABC 26 Report (May 2015), the authors address the question: What is the appropriate regulatory paradigm for modern breeding?


The Case For Vertical Integration In The Developing Bioenergy Industry, Isabel F. Peres, Timothy A. Slating, Jay P. Kesan 2015 College of William & Mary Law School

The Case For Vertical Integration In The Developing Bioenergy Industry, Isabel F. Peres, Timothy A. Slating, Jay P. Kesan

William & Mary Environmental Law and Policy Review

For many countries, money grows on trees: woody biomass is one of the most important sources of renewable energy in the European Union. In the United States, biomass was the input for almost half of the renewable energy generated in 2000; of the energy generated by biomass, seventy-six percent was produced from wood.1 Currently, biomass is the largest source of renewable energy in the country. The ability to secure a reliable and stable supply of biomass is therefore extremely important for the future of the renewable energy industry. According to the United States Department of Energy, the success of ...


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