Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Cultural Heritage Law Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

62 Full-Text Articles 53 Authors 9682 Downloads 16 Institutions

All Articles in Cultural Heritage Law

Faceted Search

62 full-text articles. Page 1 of 2.

Killing A Culture: The Intentional Destruction Of Cultural Heritage In Iraq And Syria Under International Law, Caitlin V. Hill 2017 University of Georgia School of Law

Killing A Culture: The Intentional Destruction Of Cultural Heritage In Iraq And Syria Under International Law, Caitlin V. Hill

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


The Time Is Now: Why The United States Should Follow The United Kingdom's Lead And Implement A Federal Nazi-Looted Art Spoliation Advisory Panel, Chloe Ricke 2017 University of Georgia School of Law

The Time Is Now: Why The United States Should Follow The United Kingdom's Lead And Implement A Federal Nazi-Looted Art Spoliation Advisory Panel, Chloe Ricke

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


Tribal Jurisdiction—A Historical Bargain, Matthew L.M. Fletcher, Leah Jurss 2017 University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law

Tribal Jurisdiction—A Historical Bargain, Matthew L.M. Fletcher, Leah Jurss

Maryland Law Review

No abstract provided.


Untangling The Court’S Sovereignty Doctrine To Allow For Greater Respect Of Tribal Authority In Addressing Domestic Violence, Lauren Oppenheimer 2017 University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law

Untangling The Court’S Sovereignty Doctrine To Allow For Greater Respect Of Tribal Authority In Addressing Domestic Violence, Lauren Oppenheimer

Maryland Law Review

No abstract provided.


Res Extra Commercium And The Barriers Faced When Seeking The Repatriation And Return Of Potent Cultural Objects, Sara Gwendolyn Ross 2017 Seattle University School of Law

Res Extra Commercium And The Barriers Faced When Seeking The Repatriation And Return Of Potent Cultural Objects, Sara Gwendolyn Ross

American Indian Law Journal

No abstract provided.


How Photographs Infringe, Terry S. kogan 2017 S.J. Quinney College of Law, University of Utah

How Photographs Infringe, Terry S. Kogan

Utah Law Faculty Scholarship

Courts and commentators have lavished attention on the question of what makes a photograph original and entitled to copyright protection. Far less attention has been devoted to the issue of how photographs infringe. This is the first Article to systematically explore the different ways in which a photograph can steal intellectual property. Photographs can infringe in two ways: by replication and by imitation. A photograph infringes by replication when, without permission, a photographer points her camera directly at a copyright-protected work—a sculpture, a painting, another photograph—and clicks the shutter. A photograph can also infringe by imitation. In such ...


Beyond The Destruction Of Syria: Considering A Future In Syria And The Protection Of The Right To Culture, 15 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 522 (2016), Sarah Dávila-Ruhaak 2017 Selected Works

Beyond The Destruction Of Syria: Considering A Future In Syria And The Protection Of The Right To Culture, 15 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 522 (2016), Sarah Dávila-Ruhaak

Sarah Dávila-Ruhaak

Although the right to culture has been widely recognized under international human rights, its reach and practical application has been limited in cultural preservation efforts. Individuals and communities that attempt to be part of the decision-making process in preservation efforts often face barriers to access in that process. The need to re-conceptualize the right to culture is vital for its protection and preservation. This article proposes that the right to self-determination must be utilized as a core fundamental principle that enables a disenfranchised individual or community to have ownership in preservation efforts and decide how to shape their identity. It ...


How New York Investors Financed The Looting Of Syria, Ukraine, And Iraq: The Need To Increase Civil Liabilities For "Current Possessors" Of Stolen Antiquities In The 21st Century, Lukas Padegimas 2016 Cleveland-Marshall College of Law

How New York Investors Financed The Looting Of Syria, Ukraine, And Iraq: The Need To Increase Civil Liabilities For "Current Possessors" Of Stolen Antiquities In The 21st Century, Lukas Padegimas

The Global Business Law Review

This note argues that the U.S. should pass its own self-policing legislation that will make it less enticing for thieves to try to sell stolen antiquities to the U.S. market. Our world heritage is under threat from undeterred looting, which results in antiquities vanishing from museum storerooms and archeological sites before ending up in the storerooms of investors. Currently, source nations that attempt to have stolen antiquities returned are deterred by the high legal costs involved. As the biggest market for stolen cultural property, states within the U.S. should amend current replevin laws so that the possessors ...


Sense Of Place: The Intersection Between Built Heritage And Intangible Cultural Heritage In Singapore, Jack Tsen-Ta Lee 2016 Singapore Management University

Sense Of Place: The Intersection Between Built Heritage And Intangible Cultural Heritage In Singapore, Jack Tsen-Ta Lee

Jack Tsen-Ta LEE

Built heritage in Singapore is safeguarded through two legal regimes, one relating to national monuments declared under the Preservation of Monuments Act (Cap 239, 2011 Rev Ed), and the other relating to conservation areas declared under the Planning Act (Cap 232, 1998 Rev Ed). In contrast, no particular legal protection exists for intangible cultural heritage. Considering examples such as tomb inscriptions and rituals for honouring the deceased at Bukit Brown Cemetery, this article explores how built heritage can be secured and enriched by giving greater recognition and protection in inter-national and domestic law to the intangible cultural heritage associated with ...


Ahead Of The Curve: Promoting Land Tenure Security In Sub-Saharan Africa To Protect The Environment, Andrew R. Falk 2016 Seattle University School of Law

Ahead Of The Curve: Promoting Land Tenure Security In Sub-Saharan Africa To Protect The Environment, Andrew R. Falk

Seattle Journal for Social Justice

No abstract provided.


The Destruction Of Cultural Heritage: A Crime Against Property Or A Crime Against People?, 15 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 336 (2016), Patty Gerstenblith 2016 John Marshall Law School

The Destruction Of Cultural Heritage: A Crime Against Property Or A Crime Against People?, 15 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 336 (2016), Patty Gerstenblith

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

The destruction of cultural heritage has played a prominent role in the ongoing conflicts in Syria and Iraq and in the recent conflict in Mali. This destruction has displayed the failure of international law to effectively deter these actions. This article reviews existing international law in light of this destruction and the challenges posed by the issues of non-international armed conflict, non-state actors and the military necessity exception. By examining recent developments in applicable international law, the article proposes that customary international law has evolved to interpret existing legal instruments and doctrines concerning cultural heritage in light of the principles ...


From Tragedy To Triumph In The Pursuit Of Looted Art: Altmann, Benningson, Portrait Of Wally, Von Saher And Their Progeny, 15 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 394 (2016), Donald Burris 2016 John Marshall Law School

From Tragedy To Triumph In The Pursuit Of Looted Art: Altmann, Benningson, Portrait Of Wally, Von Saher And Their Progeny, 15 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 394 (2016), Donald Burris

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

This article is a broad and approachable overview of American law regarding the potential repatriation of Nazi-looted art—an area which the author and his now-retired partner, Randy Schoenberg, helped develop from the ground up starting with the development of the Altmann case, decided by the U.S. Supreme Court in 2004, and continuing on through a number of fascinating looted-art cases of a more recent vintage. Parts of the article read as much like a detective story as a summary of cases and Mr. Burris has been kind enough to share both his approach to these cases and his ...


Where Are We And Where Are We Going: Legal Developments In Cultural Property And Nazi Art Looting, 15 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 435 (2016), Thomas Kline 2016 John Marshall Law School

Where Are We And Where Are We Going: Legal Developments In Cultural Property And Nazi Art Looting, 15 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 435 (2016), Thomas Kline

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

No abstract provided.


Nagpra And Its Limitations: Repatriation Of Indigenous Cultural Heritage, 15 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 472 (2016), Kevin Ray 2016 John Marshall Law School

Nagpra And Its Limitations: Repatriation Of Indigenous Cultural Heritage, 15 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 472 (2016), Kevin Ray

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

The historical conditions under which indigenous (and specifically Native American) cultural heritage objects have been collected present tremendous difficulties, since collecting efforts were frequently influenced, or even directed, by racist or colonialist ideologies. Recent decades have seen efforts to redress past wrongs, as well as to correct misunderstandings and misrepresentations. The restitution and repatriation processes of the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act of 1990, enacted as human rights legislation, provide powerful, but imperfect tools for the protection of Native American cultural heritage. The challenges are both domestic and international. Recent French auction sales of Hopi, Zuni, and Navajo ...


Illusory Borders: The Myth Of The Modern Nation-State And Its Impact On The Repatriation Of Cultural Artifacts, 15 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 486 (2016), Lubna El-Gendi 2016 John Marshall Law School

Illusory Borders: The Myth Of The Modern Nation-State And Its Impact On The Repatriation Of Cultural Artifacts, 15 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 486 (2016), Lubna El-Gendi

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

While the current world order of independent nation-states may seem like a natural state that has existed for centuries, in reality, it is a relatively new development that was forged after the demise of imperial rule. Yet, the nation-state is the foundational entity of our current international political and legal framework. International treaties and relations are structured around the nation-state, which is recognized as the core entity in which rights are vested and on which obligations are imposed. This prioritization of the nation-state leads to issues when we consider the repatriation of cultural heritage, particularly in light of the history ...


Beyond The Destruction Of Syria: Considering A Future In Syria And The Protection Of The Right To Culture, 15 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 522 (2016), Sarah Dávila-Ruhaak 2016 John Marshall Law School

Beyond The Destruction Of Syria: Considering A Future In Syria And The Protection Of The Right To Culture, 15 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 522 (2016), Sarah Dávila-Ruhaak

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

Although the right to culture has been widely recognized under international human rights, its reach and practical application has been limited in cultural preservation efforts. Individuals and communities that attempt to be part of the decision-making process in preservation efforts often face barriers to access in that process. The need to re-conceptualize the right to culture is vital for its protection and preservation. This article proposes that the right to self-determination must be utilized as a core fundamental principle that enables a disenfranchised individual or community to have ownership in preservation efforts and decide how to shape their identity. It ...


Amber Tears And Copyright Fears: The Inadequate Protection Of Cultural Heritage In The United States, 15 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 543 (2016), Ingrida Latoza 2016 John Marshall Law School

Amber Tears And Copyright Fears: The Inadequate Protection Of Cultural Heritage In The United States, 15 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 543 (2016), Ingrida Latoza

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

The United States is comprised of many different cultural communities, each rich with expressions of language and custom. Cultural diversity promotes respect among individuals and harmonizes differences between communities—nationally and globally. Through the preservation of cultural heritage, diversity is maintained. Since World War II, with the exile of many from Lithuania, members of the Lithuanian-American community have strived to maintain the cultural heritage of their beloved homeland. After several decades, a Lithuanian-American cultural identity has developed, creating unique and individual traditions, adding to the cultural heritage of the United States as a whole. Most of the international community has ...


Cultural Heritage & New Media: A Future For The Past, 15 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 604 (2016), Ann Marie Sullivan 2016 John Marshall Law School

Cultural Heritage & New Media: A Future For The Past, 15 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 604 (2016), Ann Marie Sullivan

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

The application of new media to cultural heritage is consistent with the policy objectives that the copyright law of the United States stands to promote. However, the practical application of the law currently hinders these objectives, often stifling the creation and dissemination of new media works of cultural heritage. In this context, copyright law presents a problem and not a solution, a barrier and not a protection, dissuasion of creation and not encouragement and incentive. Defining the legal scope and reach of digital property and new media within the realm of art and cultural heritage law is critical for the ...


Cultural Plunder And Restitution And Human Identity, 15 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 460 (2016), Ori Soltes 2016 John Marshall Law School

Cultural Plunder And Restitution And Human Identity, 15 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 460 (2016), Ori Soltes

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

No abstract provided.


Oregon Tribal Historic Preservation Offices: The Problems And Challenges Of Starting And Maintaining A Thpo, Karly R. Law 2016 University of Montana

Oregon Tribal Historic Preservation Offices: The Problems And Challenges Of Starting And Maintaining A Thpo, Karly R. Law

Graduate Student Theses, Dissertations, & Professional Papers

As of December 31, 2015, of the 567 federally recognized tribes, 167 have established a THPO (at the time of this writing) that is recognized by the National Park Service (NPS). To manage a federally recognized THPO, a tribe must officially enter into agreements with the National Park Service on behalf of the Secretary of the Interior. There are a total of nine federally recognized tribes in Oregon, of which six have a federally recognized THPO. Two of the Oregon THPO’s were interviewed: The Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde Indian Community and the Cow Creek Band of Umpqua Tribe ...


Digital Commons powered by bepress