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Inefficient Evidence, Alex Stein 2015 SelectedWorks

Inefficient Evidence, Alex Stein

Alex Stein

Why set up evidentiary rules rather than allow factfinders to make decisions by considering all relevant evidence? This fundamental question has been the subject of unresolved controversy among scholars and policymakers since it was raised by Bentham at the beginning of the nineteenth century. This Article offers a surprisingly straightforward answer: An economically minded legal system must suppress all evidence that brings along a negative productivity-expense balance and is therefore inefficient. Failure to suppress inefficient evidence will result in serious diseconomies of scale. To operationalize this idea, I introduce a “signal-to-noise” method borrowed from statistics, science, and engineering. This method ...


Systemic Lying, Julia Simon-Kerr 2015 SelectedWorks

Systemic Lying, Julia Simon-Kerr

Julia Simon-Kerr

This Article offers the foundational account of systemic lying from a definitional and theoretical perspective. Systemic lying involves the cooperation of multiple actors in the legal system who lie or violate their oaths across cases for a consistent reason that is linked to their conception of justice. It becomes a functioning mechanism within the legal system and changes the operation of the law as written. By identifying systemic lying, this Article challenges the assumption that all lying in the legal system is the same. It argues that systemic lying poses a particular threat to the legal system. This means that ...


Unwrapping The Box The Supreme Court Justices Have Gotten Themselves Into: Internal Confrontations Over Confronting The Confrontation Clause, Paul F. Rothstein 2015 Georgetown University Law Center

Unwrapping The Box The Supreme Court Justices Have Gotten Themselves Into: Internal Confrontations Over Confronting The Confrontation Clause, Paul F. Rothstein

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

Williams v. Illinois, handed down in 2012, is the latest in a new and revolutionary line of U.S. Supreme Court cases beginning with the 2004 decision of Crawford v. Washington which radically altered the Court's former approach to the Constitutional Confrontation Clause. That clause generally requires persons who make written or oral statements outside the trial, that may constitute evidence against a criminal defendant, to take the witness stand for cross-examination rather than those statements being presented at the trial only by the writing or by another person who heard the statement.

Previous to Crawford, under Ohio v ...


Ambiguous-Purpose Statements Of Children And Other Victims Of Abuse Under The Confrontation Clause, Paul F. Rothstein 2015 Georgetown University Law Center

Ambiguous-Purpose Statements Of Children And Other Victims Of Abuse Under The Confrontation Clause, Paul F. Rothstein

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

The author examines in this paper two kinds of ambiguous-purpose out-of-court statements that are especially problematic under current Confrontation law--problematic in ways that we hope will be solved directly or indirectly by the Supreme Court when it renders its decision in Ohio v. Clark. The statements he examines are:

(1) Statements made by abused children concerning their abuse, for example to police, physicians, teachers, welfare workers, baby sitters, or family members, some of whom may be under a legal duty to report suspected abuse to legal authorities. At least some of these statements will be directly addressed by the Court ...


Supreme Court's Analysis Of Issues Raised By Death Penalty Litigants In The Court's 2004 Term, Richard Klein 2014 Touro College Jacob D. Fuchsberg Law Center

Supreme Court's Analysis Of Issues Raised By Death Penalty Litigants In The Court's 2004 Term, Richard Klein

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.


Say Sorry And Save: A Practical Argument For A Greater Role For Apologies In Medical Malpractice Law, Matthew Pillsbury 2014 University of Massachusetts School of Law

Say Sorry And Save: A Practical Argument For A Greater Role For Apologies In Medical Malpractice Law, Matthew Pillsbury

University of Massachusetts Law Review

This article examines both the potential benefits and detriments of the use of an apology in a legal setting. This article uses the specific environment surrounding a medical malpractice case to help illustrate how and why an apology should or should not be proffered by the Defendant. Ultimately, the reader of this article should have a solid understanding of how an apology can be admissible as evidence in the litigation of a medical malpractice lawsuit.


Strengths, Limitations, And Controversies Of Dna Evidence, Naseam Rachel Behrouzfard 2014 University of Massachusetts School of Law

Strengths, Limitations, And Controversies Of Dna Evidence, Naseam Rachel Behrouzfard

University of Massachusetts Law Review

This article explores the benefits of DNA evidence as well as the evidentiary problems associated with DNA. Part II discusses the history, development, and the emergence of DNA in the criminal justice system. Part III analyzes the significance of DNA evidence and its impact on recent cases. Part IV describes the disadvantages of DNA evidence in terms of efficiency, risks, human error, and its impact on jurors.


Lessons Learned From 9/11: Dna Identification In Mass Fatality Incidents, National Institute of Justice 2014 University of Massachusetts School of Law

Lessons Learned From 9/11: Dna Identification In Mass Fatality Incidents, National Institute Of Justice

University of Massachusetts Law Review

DNA analysis is the gold standard for identification of human remains from mass disasters. Particularly in the absence of traditional anthropological and other physical characteristics, forensic DNA typing allows for identification of any biological sample and the association of body parts, as long as sufficient DNA can be recovered from the samples. This is true even when the victim’s remains are fragmented and the DNA is degraded. While many effective laboratory protocols are available for DNA analysis, the analytical portion is only one part of the identification process.


Dna In The Courtroom: The 21st Century Begins, James T. Griffith, Susan L. Leclair 2014 University of Massachusetts School of Law

Dna In The Courtroom: The 21st Century Begins, James T. Griffith, Susan L. Leclair

University of Massachusetts Law Review

DNA is one of the most significant discoveries in the field of forensic evidence yet it remains underutilized in the courtroom setting. This article provides an introduction to the scientific principles, structure and composition of DNA in an effort to make DNA more accessible to the judicial process.


Introduction To Excerpts From Lessons Learned From 9/11: Dna Identification In Mass Fatality Incidents, Glenn R. Schmitt 2014 University of Massachusetts School of Law

Introduction To Excerpts From Lessons Learned From 9/11: Dna Identification In Mass Fatality Incidents, Glenn R. Schmitt

University of Massachusetts Law Review

On the 5th anniversary of the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center, the National Institute of Justice – the research, development, and evaluation agency of the U.S. Department of Justice – published a major report on the identification of mass disaster victims using DNA analysis. The report was prepared by the Kinship and Data Analysis Panel, a multidisciplinary group of scientists assembled by the National Institute of Justice to offer guidance to the New York City Office of the Chief Medical Examiner in the identification of those who perished in the World Trade Center.


Introduction, Miriam F. Miquelon-Weismann 2014 University of Massachusetts School of Law

Introduction, Miriam F. Miquelon-Weismann

University of Massachusetts Law Review

Legal educators increasingly use the classroom to import expertise from scientists and social scientists to better prepare law students to engage in specialized and collaborative fields of practice. Indeed, this project grew out of a paper course on Scientific Evidence in Civil and Criminal Cases offered during the spring 2006 semester at the law school. Students heard from accident reconstruction experts, DNA scientists, forensic pathologist and medical malpractice experts. In February 2006, Dr. Aaron Lazare, Dean and Chancellor at the University of Massachusetts, addressed the law school on a cutting-edge legal theory from his recently published book, “On Apology.” Stimulated ...


The Case For Ehearsay, Jeffrey Bellin 2014 College of William & Mary Law School

The Case For Ehearsay, Jeffrey Bellin

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Born This Way: How Neuroimaging Will Impact Jury Deliberations, Tanneika Minott 2014 Duke Law

Born This Way: How Neuroimaging Will Impact Jury Deliberations, Tanneika Minott

Duke Law & Technology Review

Advancements in technology have now made it possible for scientists to provide assessments of an individual’s mental state. Through neuroimaging, scientists can create visual images of the brain that depict whether an individual has a mental disorder or other brain defect. The importance of these advancements is particularly evident in the context of criminal law, where defendants are able to dispute their culpability for crimes committed where they lack the capacity to form criminal intent. Thus, in theory, a neuroimage depicting defective brain functioning could demonstrate a defendant’s inability to form the requisite criminal intent. Due to early ...


Contents May Have Shifted: Disentangling The Best Evidence Rule From The Rule Against Hearsay, Colin Miller 2014 Washington and Lee University School of Law

Contents May Have Shifted: Disentangling The Best Evidence Rule From The Rule Against Hearsay, Colin Miller

Washington and Lee Law Review Online

The rule against hearsay covers a statement offered to prove the truth of the matter asserted but does not cover a statement offered for another purpose. Meanwhile, the Best Evidence Rule states that a party seeking to prove the content of a writing, recording, or photograph must produce the original or account for its nonproduction. Does this mean that the Rule is inapplicable when a party seeks to prove something other than the truth of the matter asserted in a writing, recording or photograph? Most courts have answered this question in the affirmative. This essay argues these courts are wrong.


Visualizing Probabilistic Proof, Enrique Guerra-Pujol 2014 Washington University in St. Louis

Visualizing Probabilistic Proof, Enrique Guerra-Pujol

Washington University Jurisprudence Review

The author revisits the Blue Bus Problem, a famous thought-experiment in law involving probabilistic proof, and presents Bayesian solutions to different versions of the blue bus hypothetical. In addition, the author expresses his solutions in standard and visual formats, that is, in terms of probabilities and natural frequencies.


Bringing Guns To A Gun Fight: Why The Adversarial System Is Best Served By A Policy Compelling Attorneys To Ethically Mine For Metadata, Justin Fong 2014 Washington University in St. Louis

Bringing Guns To A Gun Fight: Why The Adversarial System Is Best Served By A Policy Compelling Attorneys To Ethically Mine For Metadata, Justin Fong

Washington University Jurisprudence Review

No abstract provided.


Shield Law - The Qualified Privilege Of Newscasters & Journalists In Non-Confidential News - Court Of Appeals Of New York - People V. Combest, 828 N.E.2d 583 (N.Y. 2005), Albert V. Messina Jr. 2014 Touro College Jacob D. Fuchsberg Law Center

Shield Law - The Qualified Privilege Of Newscasters & Journalists In Non-Confidential News - Court Of Appeals Of New York - People V. Combest, 828 N.E.2d 583 (N.Y. 2005), Albert V. Messina Jr.

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.


Court Of Appeals Of New York, In The Matter Of Nassau County Grand Jury Subpoena Duces Tecum Dated June 24, 2003 "Doe Law Firm" V. Spitzer, Christin Harris 2014 Touro College Jacob D. Fuchsberg Law Center

Court Of Appeals Of New York, In The Matter Of Nassau County Grand Jury Subpoena Duces Tecum Dated June 24, 2003 "Doe Law Firm" V. Spitzer, Christin Harris

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.


Supreme Court, New York County, People V. Vasquez, Jessica Goodwin 2014 Touro College Jacob D. Fuchsberg Law Center

Supreme Court, New York County, People V. Vasquez, Jessica Goodwin

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.


Supreme Court, Bronx County, People V. Paul, Adam D'Antonio 2014 Touro College Jacob D. Fuchsberg Law Center

Supreme Court, Bronx County, People V. Paul, Adam D'Antonio

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.


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