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From Alice To Bob: The Patent Eligibility Of Blockchain In A Post-Cls Bank World, Antonio M. DiNizo Jr. 2018 Case Western Reserve University School of Law

From Alice To Bob: The Patent Eligibility Of Blockchain In A Post-Cls Bank World, Antonio M. Dinizo Jr.

Journal of Law, Technology, & the Internet

Every year the World Economic Forum publishes a list of the top ten emerging technologies. This list of breakthrough technologies has included 3-D printing, self-healing biomimicry materials, and human microbiome therapeutics. In 2016, the financial technology Blockchain dominated the list. Over $1 billion was invested into Blockchain technology and major financial firms are actively exploring Blockchain innovation.

As innovators enter the Blockchain space, they have pushed for patent protection. This Note examines whether Blockchain is patent eligible. Patent eligibility for business methods and software patents is determined under the Supreme Court’s holding in Alice v. CLS Bank. The first ...


Volume 9, Masthead 2018 Case Western Reserve University School of Law

Volume 9, Masthead

Journal of Law, Technology, & the Internet

No abstract provided.


Blockchain Technology: An Interconnected Legal Framework For An Interconnected System, Marina Fyrigou-Koulouri 2018 Case Western Reserve University School of Law

Blockchain Technology: An Interconnected Legal Framework For An Interconnected System, Marina Fyrigou-Koulouri

Journal of Law, Technology, & the Internet

In 2018, someone hiding behind the pseudonym Satoshi Nakamoto created Bitcoin, the first decentralized cryptocurrency operating without a central bank or authority. However, the true revolution seems to be its underlying technology; blockchain. Today, a lot of discussion is taking place around the legal issues of this nascent technology. This paper focuses on blockchain and the law. After exploring blockchain’s basic features, it will propose an international regulatory framework suitable for this technology’s characteristics and its borderless nature.


How Daubert And Its Progeny Have Failed Criminalistics Evidence And A Few Things The Judiciary Could Do About It, David H. Kaye 2018 Penn State Law

How Daubert And Its Progeny Have Failed Criminalistics Evidence And A Few Things The Judiciary Could Do About It, David H. Kaye

Journal Articles

A recent report of the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology questioned the validity of several types of criminalistics identification evidence and recommended “a best practices manual and an Advisory Committee note, providing guidance to Federal judges concerning the admissibility under Rule 702 of expert testimony based on forensic feature-comparison methods.” This article supplies information on why and how judicial bodies concerned with possible rules changes—and courts applying the current rules—can improve their regulation of criminalistics identification evidence. First, it describes how courts have failed to faithfully apply Daubert v. Merrell Dow Pharmaceutical’s criteria ...


Firearm-Mark Evidence: Looking Back And Looking Ahead, David H. Kaye 2018 Penn State Law

Firearm-Mark Evidence: Looking Back And Looking Ahead, David H. Kaye

Journal Articles

This article, written as a contribution to a festschrift for Paul Giannelli, surveys the development of the law on one type of feature-matching evidence that repeatedly attracted Professor Giannelli’s attention — “firearm-mark evidence.” By inspecting toolmarks on bullets or spent cartridge cases, firearms examiners can supply valuable information on whether a particular gun fired the ammunition in question. But the limits on this information have not always been respected in court, and a growing number of opinions have tried to address this fact.

The article explains how the courts have moved from a position of skepticism of the ability of ...


Is Tricking A Robot Hacking?, Ryan Calo, Ivan Evtimov, Earlence Fernandes, Tadayoshi Kohno, David O'Hair 2018 University of Washington School of Law

Is Tricking A Robot Hacking?, Ryan Calo, Ivan Evtimov, Earlence Fernandes, Tadayoshi Kohno, David O'Hair

Tech Policy Lab

The authors of this essay represent an interdisciplinary team of experts in machine learning, computer security, and law. Our aim is to introduce the law and policy community within and beyond academia to the ways adversarial machine learning (ML) alter the nature of hacking and with it the cybersecurity landscape. Using the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act of 1986—the paradigmatic federal anti-hacking law—as a case study, we mean to evidence the burgeoning disconnect between law and technical practice. And we hope to explain what is at stake should we fail to address the uncertainty that flows from the ...


Nuisance Law And The Doctrine Of Equivalents In Patent Law, Min-Chiuan Wang 2018 Santa Clara Law

Nuisance Law And The Doctrine Of Equivalents In Patent Law, Min-Chiuan Wang

Santa Clara High Technology Law Journal

Nuisance Law and the Doctrine of Equivalents in Patent Law


Oversharenting: Is It Really Your Story To Tell?, 33 J. Marshall J. Info. Tech. & Privacy L. 121 (2018), Holly Kathleen Hall 2018 John Marshall Law School

Oversharenting: Is It Really Your Story To Tell?, 33 J. Marshall J. Info. Tech. & Privacy L. 121 (2018), Holly Kathleen Hall

The John Marshall Journal of Information Technology & Privacy Law

Social media is about sharing information. If you are a parent, often the tendency is to relate every aspect of your children’s lives. Most of the time, children do not consent to postings about them and will have a permanent digital shadow created by their parents that follows them the rest of their lives. The purpose of this article is to analyze the current status and potential future of children’s online privacy from a comparative legal approach, highlighting recent case law in the United Kingdom, which is trending toward carving out special privacy rights for children. This contrasts ...


Are “Evan’S Law” And The Textalyzer Immediate Solutions To Today’S Rapid Changes In Technology Or Encroachments On Drivers’ Privacy Rights?, 33 J. Marshall J. Info. Tech. & Privacy L. 143 (2018), Aggie Baumert 2018 John Marshall Law School

Are “Evan’S Law” And The Textalyzer Immediate Solutions To Today’S Rapid Changes In Technology Or Encroachments On Drivers’ Privacy Rights?, 33 J. Marshall J. Info. Tech. & Privacy L. 143 (2018), Aggie Baumert

The John Marshall Journal of Information Technology & Privacy Law

No abstract provided.


Nothing Personal, It’S Just Business: How Google’S Course Of Business Operates At The Expense Of Consumer Privacy, 33 J. Marshall J. Info. Tech. & Privacy L. 187 (2018), Kayla McKinnon 2018 John Marshall Law School

Nothing Personal, It’S Just Business: How Google’S Course Of Business Operates At The Expense Of Consumer Privacy, 33 J. Marshall J. Info. Tech. & Privacy L. 187 (2018), Kayla Mckinnon

The John Marshall Journal of Information Technology & Privacy Law

No abstract provided.


Categories Of Anti-Obviousness Case Law: (1) Laundry Lists; (2) Redundant Advantages; And (3) Advantage Not Needed And Not Relevant, 17 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 395 (2018), Tom Brody 2018 John Marshall Law School

Categories Of Anti-Obviousness Case Law: (1) Laundry Lists; (2) Redundant Advantages; And (3) Advantage Not Needed And Not Relevant, 17 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 395 (2018), Tom Brody

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

Obviousness rejections are most commonly rebutted by arguments that the prior art fails to disclose all the claim elements or that the examiner had failed to assert a proper rationale for combining references. Additional rebuttal strategies include those based on Federal Circuit case law on: (1) Non-analogous art, (2) Rendering the prior art unsatisfactory for its intended purpose, (3) Proposed modification cannot change the principle of operation of a reference, (4) Redundant advantages, (5) Advantage provided by the secondary reference is not needed by and not relevant to the primary reference, (6) Disparate references, (7) Context differs between cited references ...


Knowledge/Skill Standards Of A "Person Skilled In Art": A Concern Less Visited, 17 Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 588 (2018), Naina Khanna, Jasmeet Gulati 2018 John Marshall Law School

Knowledge/Skill Standards Of A "Person Skilled In Art": A Concern Less Visited, 17 Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 588 (2018), Naina Khanna, Jasmeet Gulati

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

The law is differential across jurisdictions when it comes to the skill standard required for the PSITA/PHOSITA in Patent Law. This article will analyze the various levels of skill addressed throughout European, Indian, and U.S. Patent Law. Whether the level of skill be ‘ordinary’, ‘extraordinary’ or otherwise, discrepencies exist throughout the court systems, manuals of examination and the like. Much hinges on the determination of patentability when the expertise or level of skill of the PSITA/PHOSITA is often vague and indeterminative. It is submitted that since the advancement in technology is taking place at a very rapid ...


The Supreme Court: A Help Or A Hindrance To The Federal Circuit's Mission?, 17 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 298 (2018), Donald Dunner 2018 John Marshall Law School

The Supreme Court: A Help Or A Hindrance To The Federal Circuit's Mission?, 17 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 298 (2018), Donald Dunner

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

Before the establishment of the Federal Circuit, the system of patent enforcement was deeply flawed, with the circuit courts then responsible for reviewing district court patent decisions harboring widely varying attitudinal views in the interpretation of the patent law. Suggestions for solving the problem through a single specialized appellate patent court were consistently rejected due to general hostility to specialized courts. The formation of the Federal Circuit in 1982 initially appeared to solve the problem in providing uniform and predictable rules governing the enforcement of patents, an essential aspect of the court’s mission. The Supreme Court did not provide ...


Patent Pilot Program Perspectives: Patent Litigation In The Northern District Of Illinois, 17 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 348 (2018), 2018 John Marshall Law School

Patent Pilot Program Perspectives: Patent Litigation In The Northern District Of Illinois, 17 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 348 (2018)

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

A Patent Pilot Program, or PPP, is geared towards giving designated judges in various districts more experience with patent cases. The Volume 17 RIPL Executive Board interviewed several participating judges in the Northern District of Illinois’ PPP.

This note is comprised of interviews with Judge Thomas M. Durkin, Judge Matthew F. Kennelly, and Judge Rebecca R. Pallmeyer of the United States District Court, Northern District of Illinois; taken over the course of May and June of 2017 by the Volume 17 RIPL Board members Kaylee Willis and Benjamin Lockyer. Its contents compile a uniform effort by both the judges interviewed ...


The Trademark Disclaimer Provision Of The Lanham Act: Is Uspto Flexibility Worth Litigant Ambiguity?, 17 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 305 (2018), Scott Locke 2018 John Marshall Law School

The Trademark Disclaimer Provision Of The Lanham Act: Is Uspto Flexibility Worth Litigant Ambiguity?, 17 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 305 (2018), Scott Locke

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

Most trademark applicants and the attorneys who counsel them are familiar with the requirement that they disclaim terms within their trademarks because those terms are descriptive or generic. The United States Patent and Trademark Office’s authority to direct applicants to disclaim terms is codified in the Trademark Disclaimer Provision of the Lanham Act, which provides examiners with a great deal of discretion. The same provision has been interpreted as providing applicants with the options of: taking conflicting positions, e.g., that the term is neither descriptive nor generic in the context of their marks, when asserting common law rights ...


Failure Is Not Falling Down But Refusing To Get Up: Implication Of Huawei/Zte Framework (Cjeu 2015) In Europe, 17 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 326 (2018), Ashish Bharadwaj, Dipinn Verma 2018 John Marshall Law School

Failure Is Not Falling Down But Refusing To Get Up: Implication Of Huawei/Zte Framework (Cjeu 2015) In Europe, 17 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 326 (2018), Ashish Bharadwaj, Dipinn Verma

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

The jurisprudence on standard-essential patents (SEPs) has evolved substantially in the last few years, particularly in the European jurisdictions, where EU courts have dealt with certain FRAND and antitrust issues in an unambiguous and novel manner. The 2015 landmark judgement in Huawei v. ZTE by the Court of Justice of the European Union brought clarity in understanding ‘unwilling licensee’ and laid down terms under which the holder of a FRAND-compliant SEP can seek injunctive relief that does not amount to an abuse of its dominant position. Four important judgements in Germany followed, where the regional courts have applied the CJEU ...


Deja Vu Or Copyright Infringement? Why Melania Trump Infringed On Michelle Obama's Copyrighted Speech Through Subconscious Copying, 17 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 360 (2018), Danielle Mobley 2018 John Marshall Law School

Deja Vu Or Copyright Infringement? Why Melania Trump Infringed On Michelle Obama's Copyrighted Speech Through Subconscious Copying, 17 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 360 (2018), Danielle Mobley

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

In 2016, Melania Trump recited a beautiful speech at the Republican National Convention that had portions which sounded exactly like a speech given by Michelle Obama at the Democratic National Convention in 2008. Mrs. Trump feigned ignorance of the 2008 DNC speech, and essentially the speech was superseded by another news story within a week. While some critics claim plagiarism, Mrs. Obama could have a potential copyright infringement claim against Mrs. Trump based on the context of the speech, the actual portions lifted from Mrs. Obama’s speech, and the doctrine of subconscious copying. This article first examines the elements ...


The Slants Decision Understates The Value Of Trademark Registration In Promoting Speech - Correctly Decided With A Conclusory Analysis, 17 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 380 (2018), David Brezina 2018 John Marshall Law School

The Slants Decision Understates The Value Of Trademark Registration In Promoting Speech - Correctly Decided With A Conclusory Analysis, 17 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 380 (2018), David Brezina

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

The highly anticipated case of Matal v. Tam resulted in the band, The Slants, eventually being able to register their band name as a trademark, with a goal in mind to reclaim Asian stereotypes. Despite this decision, it is not immediately clear how having a registration enhances the registrant’s right to use the mark as a part of free speech, when the Court observes that Tam could call his band The Slants even without registration. This article touches on the Tam case, by analyzing both the positive and negative rights that federal trademark registration yields. By expanding on a ...


Delaying Competition: How Sound Public Policy And Rigorous Antitrust Scrutiny Can Be Applied To Controversial Patent Settlements, 17 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 655 (2018), Sam Hensel 2018 John Marshall Law School

Delaying Competition: How Sound Public Policy And Rigorous Antitrust Scrutiny Can Be Applied To Controversial Patent Settlements, 17 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 655 (2018), Sam Hensel

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

The rising costs of prescription drugs are a growing concern for many Americans. The restraint of trade for pharmaceutical drugs is a cause of rising costs for consumers, as companies seek to push potential competitors out of the market to maintain profits. This unlawful restraint of trade will be discussed in this comment. Specifically, this comment will focus on "Pay for Delay" agreements, mostly between generic versus brand name pharmaceutical manufacturers. The proliferation of these agreements only leads to an unsustainable market that discourages innovation and advancement, and promotes fraud, as invalid patents are used as leverage to prevent generics ...


A Battle Between Moral Rights And Freedom Of Expression: How Would Moral Rights Empower The "Charging Bull" Against The "Fearless Girl"?, 117 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 672 (2018), Tzu-I Lee 2018 John Marshall Law School

A Battle Between Moral Rights And Freedom Of Expression: How Would Moral Rights Empower The "Charging Bull" Against The "Fearless Girl"?, 117 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 672 (2018), Tzu-I Lee

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

No abstract provided.


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