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3d-Printed Food, Jasper L. Tran 2017 George Mason University

3d-Printed Food, Jasper L. Tran

Jasper L. Tran

No abstract provided.


Managing Cyberthreat, Lawrence J. Trautman 2017 Santa Clara Law

Managing Cyberthreat, Lawrence J. Trautman

Santa Clara High Technology Law Journal

Managing Cyberthreat


Plausibility Under The Defend Trade Secrets Act, 16 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 188 (2017), Michelle Evans 2017 John Marshall Law School

Plausibility Under The Defend Trade Secrets Act, 16 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 188 (2017), Michelle Evans

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

With the recent passage of the Defend Trade Secrets Act (DTSA), a federal civil cause of action for trade secret misappropriation is now available. To add some familiarity to the Act, the drafters incorporated definitions similar to those of the Uniform Trade Secrets Act (UTSA). However, even though the provisions may seem familiar, there is a new requirement that is not obvious on the face of the statute- the plausibility requirement for pleading under the federal rules. To understand plausibility; however, one must understand the DTSA. Unfortunately, there is no guidance from the DTSA that can aid interpretation of the ...


Alice-Backed Securitization: Start-Ups’ New Alternative To Venture Capital, 16 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 246 (2017), Robert Laverty 2017 John Marshall Law School

Alice-Backed Securitization: Start-Ups’ New Alternative To Venture Capital, 16 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 246 (2017), Robert Laverty

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

As of 2016, the United States software industry added $1.07 trillion in total value to the U.S. economy alone. Today, it’s no mystery that high-tech solutions are embedded in the fabric of our world. Venture Capital has been the dominant source of funding for startup and midsize high-tech firms for the last two decades. However, Venture Capital funding comes at a hefty cost. Young developing high-tech firms are often forced to bargain large shares of their ownership and managerial control to receive the funding they need to realize their potential. But, what if high-tech firms didn’t ...


Blocking Ad Blockers, 16 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 272 (2017), Tyler Barbacovi 2017 John Marshall Law School

Blocking Ad Blockers, 16 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 272 (2017), Tyler Barbacovi

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

The prevalence of ad blocking software (software that prevents the loading of web based advertisements) is a growing problem for website owners and content creators who rely on advertising revenue to earn money. While the number of ad block users continues to increase, there has thus far been no significant legal challenge to ad blocking in the United States. This comment examines how a website owner, through a combination of technological improvements and the anti-circumvention provisions of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, could successfully raise a legal challenge against the purveyors of ad blocking software.


An Empirical Study Of Law Journal Copyright Practices, 16 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 207 (2017), Brian Frye, Christopher Ryan, Franklin Runge 2017 John Marshall Law School

An Empirical Study Of Law Journal Copyright Practices, 16 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 207 (2017), Brian Frye, Christopher Ryan, Franklin Runge

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

This article presents an empirical study of the copyright practices of American law journals in relation to copyright ownership and fair use, based on a 24-question survey. It concludes that many American law journals have adopted copyright policies that are inconsistent with the expectations of legal scholars and the scope of copyright protection. Specifically, many law journals have adopted copyright policies that effectively preclude open-access publishing, and unnecessarily limit the fair use of copyrighted works. In addition, it appears that some law journals may not understand their own copyright policies. This article proposes the creation of a Code of Copyright ...


Design Patent Litigation: Is "Obvious To Try" Unavailable For Validity Challenges Under 35 U.S.C. § 103?, 16 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 173 (2017), Scott Locke 2017 John Marshall Law School

Design Patent Litigation: Is "Obvious To Try" Unavailable For Validity Challenges Under 35 U.S.C. § 103?, 16 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 173 (2017), Scott Locke

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

Ten years ago, the United States Supreme Court shook the foundation of U.S. patent law when it announced that a patented invention could be invalidated because the claimed combination of heightened the thr whether a person of ordinary skill in the art would deem a combination of features obvious to try can be measured against a perceived a likelihood of success for achieving a purpose. But the concept does not easily translate to design patents. Those types of patents are directed to ornamental features, which by definition cannot be dictated by functionality, and thus, the success of a combination ...


The European Union And The Outer Space Treaty: Will The Twain Ever Meet?, Frans G. von der Dunk 2017 University of Nebraska College of Law

The European Union And The Outer Space Treaty: Will The Twain Ever Meet?, Frans G. Von Der Dunk

Space, Cyber, and Telecommunications Law Program Faculty Publications

In spite of the envisaged Brexit and other crises and problems currently threatening the European Union (EU), that half-way house between a group of cooperating states and a single quasi-federal union of states remains an important player in today’s world, also – at least from a bird’s eye view – in terms of outer space. Its member states Germany and France have the largest space budgets of all European states (discounting the Russian Federation as a European state), and the European flagship projects Galileo and Copernicus, with the European Commission on behalf of the Union in the driver’s seat ...


Law Without Absolutes: Toward A Pragmatic Science Of Law, JD Hsin 2017 Harvard Law School

Law Without Absolutes: Toward A Pragmatic Science Of Law, Jd Hsin

Washington University Jurisprudence Review

Although today the very idea of a science of law—the thought that law could be made a science like any other taught and studied at a modern university—has the ring of an oxymoron, this piece argues that the rejection of legal science was not only overhasty but unnecessary. There is a sense in which we can see law as a science, it argues, but only once we come to see more clearly and accurately just why the tradition of legal science begun in the earliest days of the Western legal tradition and brought to America by Christopher Columbus ...


If It's In The Game: Is There Liability For User-Generated Characters' Likeness?, 16 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 291 (2017), Jason Zenor 2017 John Marshall Law School

If It's In The Game: Is There Liability For User-Generated Characters' Likeness?, 16 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 291 (2017), Jason Zenor

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

In cases like Keller and No Doubt v. Activision, the federal courts held that the use of celebrity's likeness was a violation of the right of publicity. In response, EA Sports suspended production of college sports games. But most games still allow for gamers to create their own avatars. With game systems now being connected, gamers can download user-created content many of which will have the likeness of famous people, thus circumventing the holdings in Keller and No Doubt. Accordingly, this article examines how this type of user generated content fits within the law of appropriation. First, this article ...


Gotta Catch . . . A Lawsuit? A Legal Insight Into The Intellectual, Civil, And Criminal Battlefield Pokémon Go Has Downloaded Onto Smartphones And Properties Around The World, 16 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 329 (2017), Andrew Rossow 2017 John Marshall Law School

Gotta Catch . . . A Lawsuit? A Legal Insight Into The Intellectual, Civil, And Criminal Battlefield Pokémon Go Has Downloaded Onto Smartphones And Properties Around The World, 16 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 329 (2017), Andrew Rossow

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

Our society, and its millennials, have entered the digital age, whereby almost everything is conducted and perpetuated through electronic devices. Smartphones have dominated the mobile device market and have allowed its users to download mobile applications and games to the device. Pokémon Go, is the latest trend in mobile gaming and the start to a bright future of augmented reality. But what happens when augmented reality meets the physical world? Do our modern-day statutes and laws extend into the cyberspace that it is augmented reality? What happens when a user of an augmented reality game enters onto the property of ...


The Ambush At Rio, 16 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 350 (2017), Adam Epstein 2017 John Marshall Law School

The Ambush At Rio, 16 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 350 (2017), Adam Epstein

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

The purpose of this article is to explore the role of the International Olympic Committee’s (IOC) codified marketing policy known as Rule 40 which emerged to prevent ambush marketing of its biennial events. Rule 40 has quickly evolved into a controversial rule for athletes, coaches and sponsors alike who are involved in the Olympic Movement. The IOC believes that social media is a ubiquitous threat to its intellectual property during the Olympic Games akin to traditional print and television ambush marketing campaigns. As a result, the 2016 Rio De Janeiro (Rio) Summer Olympic Games represented the most intense clash ...


Commercial Creations: The Role Of End User License Agreements In Controlling The Exploitation Of User Generated Content, 16 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 382 (2017), Neha Ahuja 2017 John Marshall Law School

Commercial Creations: The Role Of End User License Agreements In Controlling The Exploitation Of User Generated Content, 16 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 382 (2017), Neha Ahuja

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

This article considers the current licensing regime used to control the exploitation of copyright protected works within the online interactive entertainment sector—particularly virtual worlds including multiplayer online games—to further author new copyrightable works. This article aims to identify the gaps that have arisen on account of the nature of these subsequently authored works and the potential for their exploitation under the said licensing regime. Users and the proprietors of virtual worlds often end up in conflict over the monetization and commercialization of user generated content on account of contradictory yet overlapping rights created by copyright law when controlled ...


The Courts' Interpretations Of Legitimate Business Purposes, With Applications To Lexmark, 16 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 411 (2017), W. Lesser 2017 John Marshall Law School

The Courts' Interpretations Of Legitimate Business Purposes, With Applications To Lexmark, 16 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 411 (2017), W. Lesser

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

Courts frequently must assess 'intent'. This article applies to the interpretation the intent of "legitimate business purposes" as a justification for restrictive use licensing agreements for patented products. Generally, the 'first sale' doctrine terminates the use rights of the patent holder. However, if the sale is conditioned on some use limitations and violators of those terms are liable for infringement. The courts, suggested in Mitchell v. Hawley (1872) and formalized in Mallinckrodt v. Medipart (1992), have allowed use restrictions based on license terms. Restrictions are disallowed under the affirmative defense of patent invalidity, such as from an antitrust violation. This ...


It’S My Mark, I Can Offend If I Want To! The Waning Of The Government’S Power To Protect Its Citizens From Widespread Discriminatory Marks, 16 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 505 (2017), Paul Sanders 2017 John Marshall Law School

It’S My Mark, I Can Offend If I Want To! The Waning Of The Government’S Power To Protect Its Citizens From Widespread Discriminatory Marks, 16 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 505 (2017), Paul Sanders

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

There is an inherent tension between the First Amendment and trademark law. For over 100 years the United States Patent and Trademark Office has protected American citizens from Marks of ill repute. In the wake of the In re Tam decision, this may become more difficult if not impossible. This comment analyzes In re Tam, as well as explores the First Amendment guarantee of free speech and trademark law, and how each intersects with each other. Additionally, this comment proposes solutions that will allow the government to continue protecting its citizens from Marks that should have no place in commerce.


Candidates Shouldn’T “Cruz” Through Political Campaigns: Why Asking For Permission To Use Music Is Becoming So Important On The Campaign Trail, 16 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 457 (2017), Courtney Willits 2017 John Marshall Law School

Candidates Shouldn’T “Cruz” Through Political Campaigns: Why Asking For Permission To Use Music Is Becoming So Important On The Campaign Trail, 16 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 457 (2017), Courtney Willits

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

Music has always been used by candidates running for political office as a way to advertise themselves to potential voters. Throughout the years, a battle between political candidates and musicians has grown due to problems caused by music licensing. Currently, an issue in law exists between politicians who obtain proper music licenses versus musicians who have a right of publicity, stating they do not want to be associated with certain candidates' political views. This comment analyzes the recent copyright case against former 2016 presidential candidate Ted Cruz, and the role it could play in this area of law. Additionally, this ...


Are We Adopting The Orphans, Or Creating Them? Medical Ethics And Legal Jurisprudential Guidance For Proposed Changes To The Orphan Drug Act, Lydia Raw 2017 Washington University School of Law

Are We Adopting The Orphans, Or Creating Them? Medical Ethics And Legal Jurisprudential Guidance For Proposed Changes To The Orphan Drug Act, Lydia Raw

Washington University Jurisprudence Review

This Note traces the subtle changes in the underlying purposes of the Orphan Drug Act, and evaluates those purposes from the perspectives of medical ethics and legal jurisprudence. Part I begins with the history of the Orphan Drug Act discussed issue by issue, to elucidate the subtle changes in the purpose of the Orphan Drug Act through its history. Part II explores the moral and ethical issues presented by the Orphan Drug Act to identify eleven guiding principles from medical ethics and legal jurisprudence. Lastly, Part III applies these guiding principles to the most common proposed amendments to the Orphan ...


A Survey Of Legal Issues Arising From The Deployment Of Autonomous And Connected Vehicles, Daniel A. Crane, Kyle D. Logue, Bryce C. Pilz 2017 University of Michigan Law School

A Survey Of Legal Issues Arising From The Deployment Of Autonomous And Connected Vehicles, Daniel A. Crane, Kyle D. Logue, Bryce C. Pilz

Michigan Telecommunications and Technology Law Review

With concerns rising over the number and variety of state regulations, companies are increasingly looking to the federal government for guidance. Representatives from Google, GM, Lyft, and Delphi testified before Congress on March 15, urging Congress to pass a federal law concerning autonomous vehicles. While the passage of any federal legislation is unclear at this time, other parts of the federal government have been extremely active in recent months. In January 2016, the Obama administration proposed a 10-year, $4 billion investment in autonomous vehicle technology. In that same announcement, the Department of Transportation (“DOT”) committed to developing model state policy ...


You Buy It, You Break It: A Comment On Dispersing The Cloud, Aaron Perzanowski 2017 Case Western University School of Law

You Buy It, You Break It: A Comment On Dispersing The Cloud, Aaron Perzanowski

Washington and Lee Law Review

No abstract provided.


Dispersing The Cloud: Reaffirming The Right To Destroy In A New Era Of Digital Property, Daniel Martin 2017 Washington and Lee University School of Law

Dispersing The Cloud: Reaffirming The Right To Destroy In A New Era Of Digital Property, Daniel Martin

Washington and Lee Law Review

No abstract provided.


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