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Are They Pirates Or Pioneers?, Ashley Song 2017 University of Pennsylvania (2012)

Are They Pirates Or Pioneers?, Ashley Song

Hyein Ashley Song Ms.

Korea has the perceptive corruption level lower than the Western countries and shares the common appetite for the cultural products with the Japanese, often regarding Japanese more noble or superior and Westerns even more. Based on this sentiment, the ‘license musicals’ which have been bilaterally purchased from the West are popularly consumed in Korea. The paper calls this is not the cultural business, but the “self-confined cripples’ money party based on the informational deceptions.” The Korean licensee who has fueled the staggering production in the US transforms to the businessmen, caster, and producer in Korea . The licensed dramatico-musical transforms to ...


What We Buy When We "Buy Now", Aaron Perzanowski, Chris Jay Hoofnagle 2016 Case Western Reserve University

What We Buy When We "Buy Now", Aaron Perzanowski, Chris Jay Hoofnagle

Aaron K. Perzanowski

Retailers such as Apple and Amazon market digital media to consumers using the familiar language of product ownership, including phrases like “buy now,” “own,” and “purchase.” Consumers may understandably associate such language with strong personal property rights. But the license agreements and terms of use associated with these transactions tell a different story. They explain that ebooks, mp3 albums, digital movies, games, and software are not sold, but merely licensed. The terms limit consumers' ability to resell, lend, transfer, and even retain possession of the digital media they acquire. Moreover, unlike physical media products, access to digital media is contingent ...


"Transplanting" Organ Donors With Printers: The Legal And Ethical Implications Of Manufacturing Organs, Katherine A. Smith 2016 University of Akron

"Transplanting" Organ Donors With Printers: The Legal And Ethical Implications Of Manufacturing Organs, Katherine A. Smith

Akron Law Review

Three-dimensional (3D) printing is no longer restricted to simple inanimate objects; that conjecture is a thing of the past. With advancements in many areas of science, living tissues and organs can now be printed through a technique called 3D bioprinting. This technology could potentially save the lives of the 120,000 Americans in need of an organ transplant. However, whether or not a 3D bioprinted organ qualifies as a “human organ” under the National Organ Transplant Act (NOTA) and whether 3D bioprinted organs require federal approval could either delay or completely bar this technology’s promise. The Ninth Circuit’s ...


Curated Innovation, Lital Helman 2016 University of Akron

Curated Innovation, Lital Helman

Akron Law Review

The regulation of innovation-intensive industries is a critical issue for both innovation policy and regulation. In this Article, I propose a new framework to the way innovation-intensive industries are regulated.

My proposal is a four-pronged model, which I term “Curated Innovation.” In the first stage, policymakers would set a standard that would represent the outcome the regulation seeks to achieve. Second, policymakers would launch a competition, where innovative technologies or methods would race to meet the standard that was defined. Third, policymakers would select the methods or technologies that come closest to meeting the standard and create an incentive in ...


Are Universities Special?, Shubha Ghosh 2016 University of Akron

Are Universities Special?, Shubha Ghosh

Akron Law Review

Universities offer a space for development of ideas, exploration of basic research, and productive outlets for creation and invention. As such, they are key to the innovation environment within which intellectual property laws operate. Although scholarship has focused on universities as institutions counter to other institutions like markets and government, less attention has been paid to universities as organizations, a site for governance through detailed rules and commonly understood norms. When understood as an organization, universities display three overlapping, but distinct models: one of pure research, one of pure commercialization, and one of public purpose. These three models together define ...


Intellectual Property Revenue Sharing As A Problem For University Technology Transfer, Jennifer Carter-Johnson 2016 University of Akron

Intellectual Property Revenue Sharing As A Problem For University Technology Transfer, Jennifer Carter-Johnson

Akron Law Review

The Bayh-Dole Act, often credited with the explosion of university technology transfer, requires universities to incentivize invention disclosure by sharing the royalties generated by patent licensing with inventors. Many scholars have debated the effectiveness of university implementation of this requirement, and, indeed, the low rate of invention disclosure by academic researchers to the university is often a bottleneck in the technology-transfer process.

Unfortunately, most discussions focusing on inventor compliance with Bayh-Dole Act requirements have explored faculty-inventor motivations. However, in most cases, university inventions are joint products of a group of university members including not only faculty but also post-doctoral researchers ...


What's The Harm Of Trademark Infringement?, Rebecca Tushnet 2016 University of Akron

What's The Harm Of Trademark Infringement?, Rebecca Tushnet

Akron Law Review

Abstract

Over the course of the twentieth century, judges came to accept trademark owners’ arguments that any kind of consumer confusion over their relationship to some other producer caused them actionable harm. Changes in the law of remedies, however, have recently led some courts to question these harm stories. This Article argues for even more attention to trademark’s theories of harm; a clear-eyed look at the marketing literature, as well as the facts of particular cases, indicates that confusion about non-competing products is often harmless.


Toward A System Of Invention Registration: The Leahy-Smith America Invents Act, Jason Rantanen, Lee Petherbridge 2016 University of Iowa College of Law

Toward A System Of Invention Registration: The Leahy-Smith America Invents Act, Jason Rantanen, Lee Petherbridge

Jason Rantanen

The recently enacted Leahy-Smith America Invents Act (“AIA”) represents the most significant legislative event affecting patent law and practice in more than half a century. In addressing the AIA, scholars and policymakers have focused with an almost laser-like exclusivity on the AIA’s imposition of a first-to-file-or-first-to-publicly-disclose system, which replaces an over 200-year-old first-to-invent tradition. This myopia, we suggest, overlooks a part of the AIA that could hold a substantially greater potential to jeopardize American innovation, job creation, and economic competitiveness: the imposition of a mechanism for supplemental examination.


Therasense V. Becton Dickinson: A First Impression, Jason Rantanen, Lee Petherbridge 2016 Yale Law School

Therasense V. Becton Dickinson: A First Impression, Jason Rantanen, Lee Petherbridge

Jason Rantanen

This Article provides the first major analysis of the very recent en banc decision of the United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit in the now famous Therasense v. Becton Dickinson. The doctrinal issue central to the case is inequitable conduct, a judicially created doctrine developed to punish patent applicants who behave inappropriately during patent prosecution, the ex parte process of patent creation. The core thesis of this Article is that Therasense could have a much more significant, complex, and nuanced impact on the legal infrastructure of American innovation than the opinion for the court appears to appreciate ...


Unenforceability, Lee Petherbridge, Jason Rantanen, R. Polk Wagner 2016 Selected Works

Unenforceability, Lee Petherbridge, Jason Rantanen, R. Polk Wagner

Jason Rantanen

The patent doctrine of inequitable conduct—which allows a patent to be held unenforceable on the basis of misbehavior by the applicant during patent prosecution—has been the subject of intense criticism from the bench and bar alike. And yet to date there has been no systematic attempt to determine whether the doctrine is or is not working as theorized. This study fills that gap. We evaluate the performance of the inequitable conduct doctrine with a novel methodological approach: by empirically characterizing the differences between patents found unenforceable and several other types of patents (unlitigated, litigated, invalid, obvious, and underdisclosed ...


Toward A System Of Invention Registration: The Leahy-Smith America Invents Act, Jason Rantanen, Lee Petherbridge 2016 University of Iowa College of Law

Toward A System Of Invention Registration: The Leahy-Smith America Invents Act, Jason Rantanen, Lee Petherbridge

Jason Rantanen

The recently enacted Leahy-Smith America Invents Act (“AIA”) represents the most significant legislative event affecting patent law and practice in more than half a century. In addressing the AIA, scholars and policymakers have focused with an almost laser-like exclusivity on the AIA’s imposition of a first-to-file-or-first-to-publicly-disclose system, which replaces an over 200-year-old first-to-invent tradition. This myopia, we suggest, overlooks a part of the AIA that could hold a substantially greater potential to jeopardize American innovation, job creation, and economic competitiveness: the imposition of a mechanism for supplemental examination.


Therasense V. Becton Dickinson: A First Impression, Jason Rantanen, Lee Petherbridge 2016 Yale Law School

Therasense V. Becton Dickinson: A First Impression, Jason Rantanen, Lee Petherbridge

Jason Rantanen

This Article provides the first major analysis of the very recent en banc decision of the United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit in the now famous Therasense v. Becton Dickinson. The doctrinal issue central to the case is inequitable conduct, a judicially created doctrine developed to punish patent applicants who behave inappropriately during patent prosecution, the ex parte process of patent creation. The core thesis of this Article is that Therasense could have a much more significant, complex, and nuanced impact on the legal infrastructure of American innovation than the opinion for the court appears to appreciate ...


Patent Law's Disclosure Requirement, Jason Rantanen 2016 University of Iowa College of Law

Patent Law's Disclosure Requirement, Jason Rantanen

Jason Rantanen

The requirement that recipients of patents disclose information about their inventions is a fundamental attribute of patent systems. Yet, despite being a core element of patent law, the disclosure requirement is rarely thought of in those terms; rather, it is conventionally approached by first dissecting it in two ways: in terms of its doctrinal mechanisms (primarily enablement and written description) and in terms of its theoretical basis. While this dissection can be useful in understanding issues within the disclosure requirement, the resulting compartmentalization also imposes limits on this approach.

This Essay approaches patent law’s disclosure requirement from a more ...


Recalibrating Our Empirical Understanding Of Inequitable Conduct, Jason Rantanen 2016 University of Iowa College of Law

Recalibrating Our Empirical Understanding Of Inequitable Conduct, Jason Rantanen

Jason Rantanen

No abstract provided.


Disuniformity, Jason Rantanen, Lee Petherbridge Ph.D. 2016 Selected Works

Disuniformity, Jason Rantanen, Lee Petherbridge Ph.D.

Jason Rantanen

The United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit is a response to a failure in judicial administration that produced a fractured, unworkable patent law—one that Congress concluded ill-served entrepreneurship and innovation. The purpose of the response—vesting exclusive jurisdiction for patent appeals in the Federal Circuit—was to permit that court to develop patent law in the direction of greater clarity and uniformity. Both at the time of the Federal Circuit's creation and again more recently scholars, judges, and practitioners have waged great debates over whether patent law uniformity furthers the ultimate goals of entrepreneurship and ...


Introduction: The Defend Trade Secrets Act Of 2015, Christopher B. Seaman 2016 Washington and Lee University School of Law

Introduction: The Defend Trade Secrets Act Of 2015, Christopher B. Seaman

Christopher B. Seaman

No abstract provided.


Introduction: The Defend Trade Secrets Act Of 2015, Christopher B. Seaman 2016 Washington and Lee University School of Law

Introduction: The Defend Trade Secrets Act Of 2015, Christopher B. Seaman

Christopher B. Seaman

No abstract provided.


The Nagoya Protocol And Indigenous Peoples, Maria Yolanda Teran 2016 The University of New Mexico

The Nagoya Protocol And Indigenous Peoples, Maria Yolanda Teran

The International Indigenous Policy Journal

This article is about Indigenous peoples’ involvement in the Nagoya Protocol negotiations from 2006 to 2010, as well as in its implementation to stop biopiracy in order to protect Pachamama, Mother Earth, and to ensure our survival and the survival of coming generations. The Nagoya Protocol is an international instrument that was adopted in Nagoya, Japan in October 2010 by the Conference of Parties (COP 10) and ratified by 51 countries in Pyeongchang, South Korea in October 2014 at COP 12. This protocol governs access to genetic resources and the fair and equitable sharing of benefits arising from their utilization ...


Open Source, Open Access, And Open Transfer: Market Approaches To Research Bottlenecks, Robin Feldman, Kris Nelson 2016 Selected Works

Open Source, Open Access, And Open Transfer: Market Approaches To Research Bottlenecks, Robin Feldman, Kris Nelson

Kristopher A Nelson

No abstract provided.


Patents And Traditional Knowledge Of The Uses Of Plants: Is A Communal Patent Regime Part Of The Solution To The Scourge Of Bio Piracy, Ikechi Mgbeoji 2016 University of British Columbia, Vancouver

Patents And Traditional Knowledge Of The Uses Of Plants: Is A Communal Patent Regime Part Of The Solution To The Scourge Of Bio Piracy, Ikechi Mgbeoji

Ikechi Mgbeoji

No abstract provided.


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