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The Alliance Of Small Island States: Intellectual Property, Cultural Heritage, And Climate Change, Matthew Rimmer 2018 Queensland University of Technology

The Alliance Of Small Island States: Intellectual Property, Cultural Heritage, And Climate Change, Matthew Rimmer

Matthew Rimmer

This article will consider the role of AOSIS in debates over intellectual property, the environment, and climate change. It will consider questions of technology transfer, climate justice, and intergenerational equity. This article will conclude that there is a need for AOSIS to bolster its position on intellectual property, technology transfer, access to genetic resources, and Indigenous Knowledge. Moreover, the group could seek to benefit from the development of international networks – such as the Technology Mechanism established under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change 1992, and the Global Indigenous Network announced by Australia at the Rio 20 discussions on ...


Puerto Rico And The Right Of Accession, Joseph Blocher, Mitu Gulati 2018 Duke Law School

Puerto Rico And The Right Of Accession, Joseph Blocher, Mitu Gulati

Faculty Scholarship

On June 11, 2017, Puerto Rico held a referendum on its legal status. Although turnout was low, 97% of ballots favored statehood, rather than independence or the status quo. The federal government, however, has financial and political reasons to resist this preference: Puerto Rico would bring with it a massive, unpayable debt, and the potential to swing the current balance of power in Congress. That then raises the two questions of whether Congress could decide expel Puerto Rico (give it “independence”) or is legally required to give it statehood (“accession”).

The answers are not obvious. International law, we argue, suggests ...


Polar Opposites: Assessing The State Of Environmental Law In The World’S Polar Regions, Mark P. Nevitt, Robert V. Percival 2017 University of Pennsylvania Law School

Polar Opposites: Assessing The State Of Environmental Law In The World’S Polar Regions, Mark P. Nevitt, Robert V. Percival

Mark P Nevitt

Climate change is fundamentally transforming both the Arctic and Antarctic polar regions.  Yet they differ dramatically in their governing legal regimes.  For the past sixty years the Antarctic Treaty System (ATS), a traditional “hard law” international law treaty system, effectively de-militarized the Antarctic region and halted competing sovereignty claims. In contrast, the Arctic region lacks a unifying Arctic treaty and is governed by the newer “soft law” global environmental law model embodied in the Arctic Council’s collaborative work.  Now climate change is challenging this model.  It is transforming the geography of both polar regions, breaking away massive ice sheets ...


Mass Displacement Of Destitute People: A Trigger For Non-Refoulement Protection?, Bernardo de Souza Dantas Fico, Leticia Machado Haertel 2017 InterAmerican Court of Human Rights

Mass Displacement Of Destitute People: A Trigger For Non-Refoulement Protection?, Bernardo De Souza Dantas Fico, Leticia Machado Haertel

The Social Practice of Human Rights: Charting the Frontiers of Research and Advocacy

This paper focuses on two problems around the mass displacement of people in extreme poverty: the characterization of such people as refugees and the application of the non-refoulement principle to mass displacements.

Extreme poverty is causal to grave human rights violations such as deprivation of water, of food, and of an adequate standard of living. These circumstances may reach a degree in which life in a country is unbearable — forcing people to move in order to enhance their likelihood of survival.

The classic understanding of the non-refoulement obligation, as enshrined in the 1951 Refugee Convention, forbids states from returning people ...


Impacting Factor In Refugee Policy: With An Analysis On Korean Refugee Policy Development, Yun-Ju Kang 2017 Indiana University - Bloomington

Impacting Factor In Refugee Policy: With An Analysis On Korean Refugee Policy Development, Yun-Ju Kang

The Social Practice of Human Rights: Charting the Frontiers of Research and Advocacy

Asia is no exception to the global refugee crisis. The number of asylum-seekers in Asian countries has escalated very quickly in recent years. In the United States, President Trump's recent executive orders suspended refugee admissions, and hostile immigration policy sparked the controversy about refugees.

The rising number of refugees and migrants from the Middle East, Africa, and South Asia created political conflicts inside the European countries. The refugee issue has emerged as a global problem.

How is the world dealing with these refugee situations? What are the common barriers in designing humanistic refugee policy, and what is the best ...


Faith-Based Approaches To Asylum: New Appeals To Accountability? Using Faith-Based Principles As Soft Law, Jinan Bastaki 2017 United Arab Emirates University

Faith-Based Approaches To Asylum: New Appeals To Accountability? Using Faith-Based Principles As Soft Law, Jinan Bastaki

The Social Practice of Human Rights: Charting the Frontiers of Research and Advocacy

Can a faith-based approach encourage states to provide greater protection for those seeking refuge and asylum? In response to the fleeing of Syrian refugees to Turkey, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan stated numerous times that the Turkish were the anṣār — an Arabic word loosely translated as ‘supporters’ or ‘champions’ — of the Syrian refugees, making the reference to the people of the city of Medina who offered refuge and a home to Prophet Muhammad and his followers fleeing the persecution of Mecca.

The reference to the anār of Muhammad gives the impression that Turkey’s act of welcoming the ...


The Socialization Of Human Rights As An Inroad To Protect Sacred Space, Leonard Hammer 2017 Hebrew University of Jerusalem

The Socialization Of Human Rights As An Inroad To Protect Sacred Space, Leonard Hammer

The Social Practice of Human Rights: Charting the Frontiers of Research and Advocacy

Serious problems exist for cultural heritage protection, and these problems are even more serious when accounting for the protection of sacred space and holy places. The lack of effectiveness of the majority of existing international norms and institutions will be reviewed in this paper, which shall then turn to potential sources for entrenching protection of scared space within states.

The paper shall rely on the human right to freedom of religion or belief as the basis for upholding sacred space given an emerging broader understanding of the right within the human rights framework.

The paper shall principally focus on the ...


The Conduct Of Hostilities And International Humanitarian Law: Challenges Of 21st Century Warfare, International Law Association Study Group on the Conduct of Hostilities in the 21st Century 2017 U.S. Naval War College

The Conduct Of Hostilities And International Humanitarian Law: Challenges Of 21st Century Warfare, International Law Association Study Group On The Conduct Of Hostilities In The 21st Century

International Law Studies

The International Law Association Study Group on the Conduct of Hostilities in the 21st Century was established in 2011 and held its first meeting in 2012. The Study Group has explored numerous issues arising from the relationship between international humanitarian law (IHL) and international human rights law in the conduct of military operations, technological challenges posed by new weapons systems, and the basic principles of IHL in the conduct of hostilities. In 2015, the Study Group established three working groups focusing on core issues within IHL in relation to the conduct of hostilities in modern warfare. These working group topics ...


Clash Of Cultures: Epistemic Communities, Negotiation Theory, And International Lawmaking, S. I. Strong 2017 The University of Akron

Clash Of Cultures: Epistemic Communities, Negotiation Theory, And International Lawmaking, S. I. Strong

Akron Law Review

International lawmaking has become an increasingly important feature in today’s globalized society, although the process is often complicated and less than transparent to outsiders. Most scholars seeking to understand international lawmaking adopt a political paradigm. However, it is critical to consult other analytical models if every facet of the process is to be fully appreciated.

This Article expands the conventional understanding about international lawmaking by applying a negotiation-analytic perspective to certain ongoing deliberations at the United Nations Commission on International Trade Law (UNCITRAL). In particular, the analysis considers how disparities between different epistemic communities could affect the shape and ...


An Analysis Of China's Human Rights Policies In Tibet: China's Compliance With The Mandates Of International Law Regarding Civil And Political Rights, Richard Klein 2017 Selected Works

An Analysis Of China's Human Rights Policies In Tibet: China's Compliance With The Mandates Of International Law Regarding Civil And Political Rights, Richard Klein

Richard Klein

Tibet is commonly viewed in the West as having been a "Shangri- La"-a utopia unspoiled by industrialization, commercialization, or pollution.


The Law And Politics Of The Charles Taylor Case, Charles Chernor Jalloh 2017 Florida International University College of Law

The Law And Politics Of The Charles Taylor Case, Charles Chernor Jalloh

Charles C. Jalloh

This article discusses a rare successful prosecution of a head of state by a modern international criminal court. The case involved former Liberian president Charles Taylor. Taylor, who was charged and tried by the United Nations-backed Special Court for Sierra Leone (“SCSL”), was convicted in April 2013 for planning and aiding and abetting war crimes, crimes against humanity, and other serious international humanitarian law violations. He was sentenced to 50 years imprisonment. The SCSL Appeals Chamber upheld the historic conviction and sentence in September 2013. Taylor is currently serving his sentence in Great Britain. This article, from an insider who ...


What Makes A Crime Against Humanity A Crime Against Humanity?, Charles Chernor Jalloh 2017 Florida International University College of Law

What Makes A Crime Against Humanity A Crime Against Humanity?, Charles Chernor Jalloh

Charles C. Jalloh

This article examines what makes a crime against humanity a crime against humanity as opposed to an ordinary offense under domestic criminal law. One answer is to say that any systematic or widespread attack against a civilian population which is sponsored, supported or condoned by the State is a crime against humanity. Another interpretation is that any widespread or systematic attacks against civilians which “infringe on basic human values” should be classified as crimes against humanity. This paper will use the Rome Statute and emerging case law of the International Criminal Court (ICC) to argue that neither of the two ...


International Decision, International Criminal Court, Decision On The Authorization Of An Investigation Into The Situation In The Republic Of Kenya, Charles Chernor Jalloh 2017 Florida International University College of Law

International Decision, International Criminal Court, Decision On The Authorization Of An Investigation Into The Situation In The Republic Of Kenya, Charles Chernor Jalloh

Charles C. Jalloh

On March 31, 2010, in its first ever decision authorizing a prosecutorial proprio motu investigation, the Pre-Trial Chamber of the International Criminal Court (ICC) granted the ICC Prosecutor permission to investigate the shocking violence which followed Kenya’s December 2007 Presidential elections under Article 15 of the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court. The majority of the Chamber ruled that both the contextual and underlying requirements of crimes against humanity had been fulfilled, including that they were committed as part of a state or organizational policy as required by Article7(2)(a) of the Rome Statute. According to the ...


Assessing The African Union Concerns About Article 16 Of The Rome State Of The International Criminal Court, Charles Chernor Jalloh, Dapo Akande, Max du Plessis 2017 Florida International University College of Law

Assessing The African Union Concerns About Article 16 Of The Rome State Of The International Criminal Court, Charles Chernor Jalloh, Dapo Akande, Max Du Plessis

Charles C. Jalloh

This article assesses the African Union’s (AU) concerns about Article 16 of the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court (ICC). It seeks to articulate a clearer picture of the law and politics of deferrals within the context of the AU’s repeated calls to the United Nations Security Council (UNSC, or the Council) to invoke Article 16 to suspend the processes initiated by the ICC against President Omar Al Bashir of Sudan. The UNSC’s failure to accede to the AU request led African States to formally withhold cooperation from the ICC in respect to the arrest and ...


Prosecuting Those Bearing 'Greatest Responsibility': The Lessons Of The Special Court For Sierra Leone, Charles Chernor Jalloh 2017 Florida International University College of Law

Prosecuting Those Bearing 'Greatest Responsibility': The Lessons Of The Special Court For Sierra Leone, Charles Chernor Jalloh

Charles C. Jalloh

This Article examines the controversial article 1(1) of the Statute of the Special Court for Sierra Leone (SCSL) giving that tribunal the competence “to prosecute those who bear the greatest responsibility” for serious international and domestic crimes committed during the latter part of the notoriously brutal Sierra Leonean conflict. The debate that arose during the SCSL trials was whether this bare statement constituted a jurisdictional requirement that the prosecution must prove beyond a reasonable doubt or merely a type of guideline for the exercise of prosecutorial discretion. The judges of the court split on the issue. This paper is ...


Kenya Vs. The Icc Prosecutor, Charles Chernor Jalloh 2017 Florida International University College of Law

Kenya Vs. The Icc Prosecutor, Charles Chernor Jalloh

Charles C. Jalloh

No abstract provided.


International Decision, African Court On Human And Peoples’ Rights, Michelot Yogogombaye V. Republic Of Senegal, Charles Chernor Jalloh 2017 Florida International University College of Law

International Decision, African Court On Human And Peoples’ Rights, Michelot Yogogombaye V. Republic Of Senegal, Charles Chernor Jalloh

Charles C. Jalloh

State Parties have automatic access to the African Court on Human and Peoples’ Rights, based in Arusha, Tanzania. In stark contrast, individuals and NGOs (i.e. those most likely to bring cases alleging human rights violations), can only initiate proceedings if the respondent State has entered a special declaration accepting the Court’s competence to receive such cases. Predictably, in a continent rife with human rights violations, only a few African States have accepted the Court’s jurisdiction to hear such (individual or NGO) petitions since its formal creation in June 1998. After years without hearing any cases, the Court ...


International Decision, International Criminal Court, Judgment On The Appeal Of The Republic Of Kenya Against Pre-Trial Chamber Decision Denying Inadmissibility Of The Kenya Situation, Charles Chernor Jalloh 2017 Florida International University College of Law

International Decision, International Criminal Court, Judgment On The Appeal Of The Republic Of Kenya Against Pre-Trial Chamber Decision Denying Inadmissibility Of The Kenya Situation, Charles Chernor Jalloh

Charles C. Jalloh

A fundamental pillar of the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court (ICC) is Article 17, which enshrines the complementarity principle – the idea that ICC jurisdiction will only be triggered when states fail to act to prosecute genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes within their national courts or in circumstances where they prove unwilling and or unable to do so. The problem is that, as shown in this case report in the American Journal of International Law on the first ICC Appeals Chamber ruling regarding a state party’s objection to the court’s assertion of jurisdiction over its ...


Context At The International Criminal Court, Hassan Ahmad 2017 Pace University

Context At The International Criminal Court, Hassan Ahmad

Pace International Law Review

In this article, I propose a contextual approach to ICC jurisdiction normatively to be adopted by the Court’s Office of the Prosecutor and Pre-Trial Chamber in investigating and eventually prosecuting crimes under the Rome Statute. Under this contextual approach, I contend that both the Prosecutor and Pre-Trial Chamber are able to consider evidence outside the traditional notions of territorial and temporal jurisdiction to conceptualize a conflict in its entirety. The totality of cross-border and inter-temporal evidence should be considered when deciding whether to investigate attacks that the Prosecutor has a reasonable basis to believe fall within the Court’s ...


Taiwan: A Derogation Of International Law?, Brian Christopher Jones 2017 University of Dundee

Taiwan: A Derogation Of International Law?, Brian Christopher Jones

Brian Christopher Jones

No abstract provided.


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