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Disaggregating Corpus Christi: The Illiberal Implications Of Hobby Lobby's Right To Free Exercise, Katharine Jackson 2016 Columbia University

Disaggregating Corpus Christi: The Illiberal Implications Of Hobby Lobby's Right To Free Exercise, Katharine Jackson

Katharine Jackson

This paper first examines and critiques the group rights to religious exercise derived from the three ontologies of the corporation suggested by different legal conceptions of corporate personhood often invoked by Courts. Finding the implicated groups rights inimical to individual religious freedom, the paper then presents an argument as to why a discourse of intra-corporate toleration and voluntariness does a better job at protecting religious liberty.


Heredity In The Epigenetic Era: Are We Facing A Politics Of Reproductive Obligations?, Michael J. Crawford 2016 University of Windsor

Heredity In The Epigenetic Era: Are We Facing A Politics Of Reproductive Obligations?, Michael J. Crawford

Biological Sciences Publications

Recent research in the emerging field of epigenetics has implications with the potential to re-ignite acrimony in the discourse of reproductive rights, medical ethics, and the role of the state in our homes and in our lives. For scientists, epigenetics has profoundly realigned our understanding of heredity: epigenetics provides a mechanism through which the environmental challenges met in one generation can be inscribed and transmitted to future offspring. Although both genetic parents have the potential to transmit heritable epigenetic changes to their offspring, mothers have a particularly potent effect because nutrition in the uterine environment can exert a supplemental effect ...


Civil Rights-Newspaper Advertisements For Employment Opportunities Located In South Africa, Which Do Not On Their Face Recite Discriminatory Conditions, Do Not Violate Municipal Anti-Discrimination Laws, Nancy L. Rumble 2016 University of Georgia School of Law

Civil Rights-Newspaper Advertisements For Employment Opportunities Located In South Africa, Which Do Not On Their Face Recite Discriminatory Conditions, Do Not Violate Municipal Anti-Discrimination Laws, Nancy L. Rumble

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


Brief Of Amici Curiae Fred T. Korematsu Center For Law And Equality, Et Al In Support Of Defendants-Appellees And Affirmance, Fred T. Korematsu Center for Law and Equality 2016 Seattle University School of Law

Brief Of Amici Curiae Fred T. Korematsu Center For Law And Equality, Et Al In Support Of Defendants-Appellees And Affirmance, Fred T. Korematsu Center For Law And Equality

Fred T. Korematsu Center for Law and Equality

No abstract provided.


Using Data To Reduce Police Violence, Stephen Rushin 2016 University of Alabama School of Law

Using Data To Reduce Police Violence, Stephen Rushin

Boston College Law Review

Congress passed the Death in Custody Reporting Act in 2014, which created a national database on civilian deaths caused by law enforcement. The Federal Bureau of Investigations and the Bureau of Justice Statistics have subsequently also announced new efforts to collect data on the frequency of deadly encounters between law enforcement and civilians. This Article explores how the federal government could use these newly amassed datasets to reduce police violence. This Article makes two contributions. The first Part of the Article argues that data alone will be insufficient to bring about widespread reform in local police departments. By making these ...


The Erosion Of The Rule Of Law When A State Attorney General Refuses To Defend The Constitutionality Of Controversial Laws, Rena M. Lindevaldsen 2016 Barry University School of Law

The Erosion Of The Rule Of Law When A State Attorney General Refuses To Defend The Constitutionality Of Controversial Laws, Rena M. Lindevaldsen

Barry Law Review

No abstract provided.


Newsroom: Reeves Urges: 'Be Citizen Soldiers', Roger Williams University School of Law 2016 Roger Williams University

Newsroom: Reeves Urges: 'Be Citizen Soldiers', Roger Williams University School Of Law

Life of the Law School (1993- )

No abstract provided.


Newsroom: Judge Keynotes Mlk Week, Roger Williams University School of Law 2016 Roger Williams University

Newsroom: Judge Keynotes Mlk Week, Roger Williams University School Of Law

Life of the Law School (1993- )

No abstract provided.


Martin Luther King, Jr. Celebration Keynote Address: The Honorable Carlton W. Reeves, United States District Court For The Southern District Of Mississippi, Roger Williams University School of Law 2016 Roger Williams University

Martin Luther King, Jr. Celebration Keynote Address: The Honorable Carlton W. Reeves, United States District Court For The Southern District Of Mississippi, Roger Williams University School Of Law

Conferences, Lectures & Events

No abstract provided.


Walden V. Fiore And The Federal Courts: Rethinking Frcp 4(K)(1)(A) And Stafford V. Briggs, Daniel M. Klerman 2016 USC Law School

Walden V. Fiore And The Federal Courts: Rethinking Frcp 4(K)(1)(A) And Stafford V. Briggs, Daniel M. Klerman

University of Southern California Legal Studies Working Paper Series

If it were not so common, the reasoning in Walden v. Fiore would seem bizarre: the jurisdiction of a federal court over a federal claim against a federal agent depends on how much power the constitution allows the state of Nevada. This strange result is, of course, the result of FRCP 4(k)(1)(A), which, in most cases, makes the jurisdiction of a federal district court co-extensive with the jurisdiction of a state court of general jurisdiction in the same district. Less obviously, the outcome in Walden v. Fiore reflects Stafford v. Briggs, which, contrary to the plain language ...


The Restorative Workplace: An Organizational Learning Approach To Discrimination, Deborah Thompson Eisenberg 2016 University of Maryland School of Law

The Restorative Workplace: An Organizational Learning Approach To Discrimination, Deborah Thompson Eisenberg

Faculty Scholarship

On the fiftieth anniversary of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act, many employers continue to search for ways to implement the law’s antidiscrimination and equal opportunity mandates into the workplace. The current litigation-based approach to employment discrimination under Title VII and similar laws focuses on weeding out “bad apples” who are explicitly prejudiced. This “victim-villain” paradigm may fail to correct the complex, nuanced causes of workplace discrimination, or exacerbate the problem. This article explores an alternative approach—restorative practices—that may integrate the policy goals of antidiscrimination laws into the practical realities of managing an organization. Restorative practices ...


Advocacy For Marriage Equality: The Power Of A Broad Historical Narrative During A Transitional Period In Civil Rights, Charles R. Calleros 2016 Arizona State University

Advocacy For Marriage Equality: The Power Of A Broad Historical Narrative During A Transitional Period In Civil Rights, Charles R. Calleros

Charles R. Calleros

Previous civil rights movements in the United States define broad historical patterns that form a narrative helpful to a proper understanding of new controversies. In essence, as a society we often could benefit from a reminder that our actions today will form the history for future generations, who will judge us with benefit of hindsight and a broader perspective. With each new civil rights controversy, we owe it to ourselves and to the victims of discrimination to ask whether we are once again in a period of transition, where conventional mores will soon sound as jarring as Justice Bradley’s ...


Measuring Political Power: Suspect Class Determinations And The Poor, Bertrall L. Ross, Su Li 2016 University of California - Berkeley

Measuring Political Power: Suspect Class Determinations And The Poor, Bertrall L. Ross, Su Li

Bertrall L Ross

Which classes are considered suspect under equal protection doctrine? The answer determines whether courts will defer to legislatures and other government actors when they single out a group for special burdens, or intervene to protect that group from such treatment. Laws burdening suspect classes receive the strictest scrutiny possible—and under current doctrine, whether a class is suspect turns largely on whether the court views the group as possessing political power.

But how do courts know when a class lacks political power? A liberal plurality of the Supreme Court initially suggested that political power should be measured according to a ...


From Baby M To Baby M(Anji): Regulating International Surrogacy Agreements, yehezkel Margalit 2016 SelectedWorks

From Baby M To Baby M(Anji): Regulating International Surrogacy Agreements, Yehezkel Margalit

Hezi Margalit

In 1985, when Kim Cotton became Britain’s first commercial surrogate mother, Europe was exposed to the issue of surrogacy for the first time on a large scale. Three years later, in 1988, the famous case of Baby M drew the attention of the American public to surrogacy as well. These two cases implicated fundamental ethical and legal issues regarding domestic surrogacy and triggered a fierce debate about motherhood, child-bearing, and the relationship between procreation, science and commerce. These two cases exemplified the debate regarding domestic surrogacy - a debate that has now been raging for decades. Contrary to the well-known ...


Keeping Cases From Black Juries: An Empirical Analysis Of How Race, Income Inequality, And Regional History Affect Tort Law, Donald G. Gifford, Brian Jones 2016 University of Maryland School of Law

Keeping Cases From Black Juries: An Empirical Analysis Of How Race, Income Inequality, And Regional History Affect Tort Law, Donald G. Gifford, Brian Jones

Faculty Scholarship

This Article presents an empirical analysis of how race, income inequality, the regional history of the South, and state politics affect the development of tort law. Beginning in the mid-1960s, most state appellate courts rejected doctrines such as contributory negligence that traditionally prevented plaintiffs’ cases from reaching the jury. We examine why some, mostly Southern states did not join this trend.

To enable cross-state comparisons, we design an innovative Jury Access Denial Index (JADI) that quantifies the extent to which each state’s tort doctrines enable judges to dismiss cases before they reach the jury. We then conduct a multivariate ...


Measuring Older Adult Confidence In The Courts And Law Enforcement, Joseph A. Hamm, Lindsey E. Wylie, Eve M. Brank 2016 Michigan State University

Measuring Older Adult Confidence In The Courts And Law Enforcement, Joseph A. Hamm, Lindsey E. Wylie, Eve M. Brank

Faculty Publications, Department of Psychology

Older adults are an increasingly relevant subpopulation for criminal justice policy but, as yet, are largely neglected in the relevant research. The current research addresses this by reporting on a psychometric evaluation of a measure of older adults’ Confidence in Legal Institutions (CLI). Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) provided support for the unidimensionality and reliability of the measures. In addition, participants’ CLI was related to cynicism, trust in government, dispositional trust, age, and education, but not income or gender. The results provide support for the measures of confidence in the courts and law enforcement, so we present the scale as a ...


Nlrb V. Noel Canning Exposes Judicial Incapacity: “Junior Varsity Politicians” Foul The President’S Textual Appointment Discretion, Victor Williams 2016 The Catholic University of America, Columbus School of Law

Nlrb V. Noel Canning Exposes Judicial Incapacity: “Junior Varsity Politicians” Foul The President’S Textual Appointment Discretion, Victor Williams

Scholarly Articles and Other Contributions

This Article is offered in tribute to civil rights legends Leon Higginbotham, Spottswood Robinson, and David Rabinovitz whose judicial recess appointments were invalidated by National Labor Relations Board v. Noel Canning. It also honors President Lyndon Johnson, who made the bold decision within just six weeks of inheriting the Oval Office, to force racial and religious integration of the federal judiciary by signing the recess commissions. The appointments, made in January 1964 during an eight day intercession recess of the 88th Senate, were President Johnson’s initial salvo in a hard-fought battle that resulted in historic advances in both civil ...


What Gideon Did, Sara Mayeux 2016 University of Pennsylvania

What Gideon Did, Sara Mayeux

Faculty Scholarship

Many accounts of Gideon v. Wainwright’s legacy focus on what Gideon did not do—its doctrinal and practical limits. For constitutional theorists, Gideon imposed a preexisting national consensus upon a few “outlier” states, and therefore did not represent a dramatic doctrinal shift. For criminal procedure scholars, advocates, and journalists, Gideon has failed, in practice, to guarantee meaningful legal help for poor people charged with crimes.

Drawing on original historical research, this Article instead chronicles what Gideon did—the doctrinal and institutional changes it inspired between 1963 and the early 1970s. Gideon shifted the legal profession’s policy consensus on ...


The Same-Actor Inference Of Nondiscrimination: Moral Credentialing And The Psychological And Legal Licensing Of Bias, Victor D. Quintanilla, Cheryl R. Kaiser 2016 Indiana University Maurer School of Law

The Same-Actor Inference Of Nondiscrimination: Moral Credentialing And The Psychological And Legal Licensing Of Bias, Victor D. Quintanilla, Cheryl R. Kaiser

Articles by Maurer Faculty

One of the most egregious examples of the tension between federal employment discrimination law and psychological science is the federal common law doctrine known as the same-actor inference.

When originally elaborated by the Fourth Circuit in Proud v. Stone, the same-actor doctrine applied only when an “employee was hired and fired by the same person within a relatively short time span.” In the two decades since, the doctrine has widened and broadened in scope. It now subsumes many employment contexts well beyond hiring and firing, to scenarios in which the “same person” entails different groups of decision makers, and the ...


How To Get Away With Career Murder: The Unconstitutional Blueprint For Systematically Purging Whistleblowers From U.S. Law Enforcement, Zena D. Crenshaw-Logal, Dr. Andrew D. Jackson, Dr. Sandra Nunn 2015 National Judicial Conduct and Disability Law Project, Inc.

How To Get Away With Career Murder: The Unconstitutional Blueprint For Systematically Purging Whistleblowers From U.S. Law Enforcement, Zena D. Crenshaw-Logal, Dr. Andrew D. Jackson, Dr. Sandra Nunn

Zena D. Crenshaw-Logal

Obviously U.S. state or federal prosecutors can be among the conspirators subjecting any given law enforcement whistleblower to retaliatory criminal prosecution.  In most instances such misdeeds are only under the color of law, i.e., they are the handy work of rogue government agents and do not constitute sovereign acts. However, according to the authors, an official or sovereign choice to “prefer” these oppressors is made each time a U.S. government agency opts not to thoroughly investigate their alleged whistleblower retaliation. The authors submit that all related convictions are accordingly void.  In addition to the “sworn public officer ...


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