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Election Guide California 2016, California Secretary of State 2016 Golden Gate University School of Law

Election Guide California 2016, California Secretary Of State

California Agencies

Table of Contents:
General Information
Nomination Requirements
Candidate Filing Information
Candidate Checklist
Pesidential Primary Election Calendar
Electors and the Electoral College
Independent Candidates
Political Party Information
Offices and Subdivisions
Calendars


Turning Cash Into Votes: The Law And Economics Of Campaign Contributions, Brett Silverberg 2016 University of Miami Law School

Turning Cash Into Votes: The Law And Economics Of Campaign Contributions, Brett Silverberg

University of Miami Business Law Review

As a result of the recent Citizens United decision and its “Super PAC” spawn, individuals, corporations, and unions are allowed to independently spend unlimited amounts to influence elections. The ramifications of the Citizens United ruling have seemingly had a grave impact on the 2016 Presidential Election. In addition to examining the laws—and their loopholes—of political campaign contributions, this Essay will also explore the economics of campaign contributions. Ultimately, there are two reasons as to why corporations provide such large sums of money: one is rent creation, which is the attempt to gain political favors for “special interests;” the ...


The Politics Of Electoral Systems In The Former Yugoslav Republic Of Macedonia, Dardan Berisha 2016 Indiana University Maurer School of Law

The Politics Of Electoral Systems In The Former Yugoslav Republic Of Macedonia, Dardan Berisha

Indiana Journal of Constitutional Design

The Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia (“FYROM”) experienced four major changes to its electoral system in the eight parliamentary elections held between 1990 and 2014. The Macedonian 1990 and 1994 parliamentary elections were held under a majority system, in which 120 members of the Parliament were elected from 120 constituencies, one member per constituency. A mixed-majority/proportional representation (“PR”) system was adopted for the 1998 elections, in which eighty-five seats were elected under the majority system from the constituencies, and thirty-five seats were elected proportionally from a nation-wide electoral district. Yet another system was adopted for the 2002 elections, in ...


Yes On 1 Campaign Amicus Curiae Brief And Signatories, Daniel A. Horwitz 2016 Selected Works

Yes On 1 Campaign Amicus Curiae Brief And Signatories, Daniel A. Horwitz

Daniel A. Horwitz

No abstract provided.


Charities And Lobbying: Institutional Rights In The Wake Of Citizens United, Lloyd Hitoshi Mayer 2016 Notre Dame Law School

Charities And Lobbying: Institutional Rights In The Wake Of Citizens United, Lloyd Hitoshi Mayer

Lloyd Hitoshi Mayer

One of the many aftershocks of the Supreme Court’s landmark decision in Citizens United v. FEC is that the decision may raise constitutional questions for the long-standing limits on speech by charities. There has been much scholarly attention both before and after that decision on the limit for election-related speech by charities, but much less attention has been paid to the relating lobbying speech limit. This article seeks to close that gap by exploring that latter limit and its continued viability in the wake of Citizens United. I conclude that while Citizens United by itself does not undermine the ...


Disclosures About Disclosure, Lloyd Hitoshi Mayer 2016 Notre Dame Law School

Disclosures About Disclosure, Lloyd Hitoshi Mayer

Lloyd Hitoshi Mayer

An often overlooked aspect of the Supreme Court’s recent decision in Citizens United v. FEC is the sharply contrasting factual accounts regarding disclosure of independent election-related spending. For eight of the Justices, such disclosure is constitutionally defensible because it enables voters to make informed decisions. For Justice Thomas, however, such disclosure is constitutionally suspect because of its potential to result in retaliation and related chilling of First Amendment speech in the form of financial contributions. The continuing importance of these contrasting narratives can be found not only in the pending Supreme Court case of Doe v. Reed, in which ...


The Much Maligned 527 And Institutional Choice, Lloyd Hitoshi Mayer 2016 Notre Dame Law School

The Much Maligned 527 And Institutional Choice, Lloyd Hitoshi Mayer

Lloyd Hitoshi Mayer

The continuing controversy over 527 organizations has led Congress to impose extensive disclosure requirements on these political organizations and to consider imposing extensive restrictions on their funding as well. The debate about what laws should govern these entities has, however, so far almost completely ignored the fact that such laws raise a complicated institutional choice question.

This Article seeks to resolve that question by developing a new institutional choice framework to guide this and similar choices. The Article first explores the context for making this determination by describing the current laws governing 527s, including both federal election laws administered by ...


Politics At The Pulpit: Tax Benefits, Substantial Burdens, And Institutional Free Exercise, Lloyd Hitoshi Mayer 2016 Notre Dame Law School

Politics At The Pulpit: Tax Benefits, Substantial Burdens, And Institutional Free Exercise, Lloyd Hitoshi Mayer

Lloyd Hitoshi Mayer

More than fifty years ago, Congress enacted a prohibition against political campaign intervention for all charities, including churches and other houses of worship, as a condition for receiving tax deductible contributions. Yet the IRS has never taken a house of worship to court for alleged violation of the prohibition through political comments from the pulpit, presumably at least in part because of concerns about the constitutionality of doing so. This decision is surprising, because a careful review of Free Exercise Clause case law - both before and after the landmark Employment Division v. Smith decision - reveals that the prohibition almost certainly ...


Charities And Lobbying: Institutional Rights In The Wake Of Citizens United, Lloyd Hitoshi Mayer 2016 Notre Dame Law School

Charities And Lobbying: Institutional Rights In The Wake Of Citizens United, Lloyd Hitoshi Mayer

Lloyd Hitoshi Mayer

One of the many aftershocks of the Supreme Court’s landmark decision in Citizens United v. FEC is that the decision may raise constitutional questions for the long-standing limits on speech by charities. There has been much scholarly attention both before and after that decision on the limit for election-related speech by charities, but much less attention has been paid to the relating lobbying speech limit. This article seeks to close that gap by exploring that latter limit and its continued viability in the wake of Citizens United. I conclude that while Citizens United by itself does not undermine the ...


Breaching A Leaking Dam?: Corporate Money And Elections, Lloyd Hitoshi Mayer 2016 Notre Dame Law School

Breaching A Leaking Dam?: Corporate Money And Elections, Lloyd Hitoshi Mayer

Lloyd Hitoshi Mayer

With a brief order issued at the end of its last term, the Supreme Court dramatically raised the stakes in Citizens United v. FEC. What many had predicted would be a case decided on narrow, technical grounds has now become a possible vehicle for overturning two key campaign finance precedents. By ordering re-argument and supplemental briefing on the issue of whether it should overrule either or both Austin v. Michigan Chamber of Commerce and the part of McConnell v. FEC which addresses the facial validity of Section 203 of the Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act of 2002, the Court signaled that ...


Constitution Day Lectures, Maxwell L. Stearns, Paula A. Monopoli, Larry S. Gibson, Robert Koulish, David J. Maher 2016 University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law

Constitution Day Lectures, Maxwell L. Stearns, Paula A. Monopoli, Larry S. Gibson, Robert Koulish, David J. Maher

Endnotes

No abstract provided.


Beyond Campaign Finance Reform, Tabatha Abu El-Haj 2016 Drexel University, Thomas R. Kline School of Law

Beyond Campaign Finance Reform, Tabatha Abu El-Haj

Boston College Law Review

While the public blames the United States Supreme Court’s decision in Citizens United v. FEC for the outsized political influence of the super-wealthy, experts in the field know that the constitutional constraints on our ability to limit the political influence of moneyed elites long-predate Citizens United and pose a formidable barrier to effective campaign finance reform. Nevertheless, the most consistent calls in legal circles are for yet more campaign finance reform. This Article argues that it is time for those serious about curtailing the influence of money in politics to recognize that the struggle for effective campaign finance reforms ...


When Immigrants Speak: The Precarious Status Of Non-Citizen Speech Under The First Amendment, Michael Kagan 2016 University of Nevada, Las Vegas, William S. Boyd School of Law

When Immigrants Speak: The Precarious Status Of Non-Citizen Speech Under The First Amendment, Michael Kagan

Boston College Law Review

Although many unauthorized immigrants have become politically active in campaigning for immigration reform, their ability to speak out publicly may depend more on political discretion than on the constitutional protections that citizens normally take for granted. Potential threats to immigrant free speech may be seen in three areas of law. First, the Department of Justice has made a broad claim that immigrants who have not been legally admitted to the country have no First Amendment protection at all. Second, the Supreme Court has approved broad prohibitions on non-citizens spending money on speech that is related to electoral campaigns. Third, the ...


Electoral Reform: Making Every Vote Count Equally, Craig M. Scott 2016 Osgoode Hall Law School of York University

Electoral Reform: Making Every Vote Count Equally, Craig M. Scott

Craig M. Scott

No abstract provided.


A Skeptical Optimist’S Perspective On Canada Getting To Proportional Representation As An Electoral Reform, Craig Scott 2016 Osgoode Hall Law School of York University

A Skeptical Optimist’S Perspective On Canada Getting To Proportional Representation As An Electoral Reform, Craig Scott

News, Editorials, and Commentaries

No abstract provided.


Section 7: Immigration Law, Institute of Bill of Rights Law at The College of William & Mary School of Law 2016 College of William & Mary Law School

Section 7: Immigration Law, Institute Of Bill Of Rights Law At The College Of William & Mary School Of Law

Supreme Court Preview

No abstract provided.


Section 2: The Court And The 2016 Election, Institute of Bill of Rights Law at The College of William & Mary School of Law 2016 College of William & Mary Law School

Section 2: The Court And The 2016 Election, Institute Of Bill Of Rights Law At The College Of William & Mary School Of Law

Supreme Court Preview

No abstract provided.


The Filibuster Of Judicial Nominations: Constitutional Crisis Or Politics As Usual?, Arthur L. Rizer III 2016 Selected Works

The Filibuster Of Judicial Nominations: Constitutional Crisis Or Politics As Usual?, Arthur L. Rizer Iii

Arthur Rizer

No abstract provided.


Frankenstein's Monster Hits The Campaign Trail: An Approach To Regulation Of Corporate Political Expenditures, Jill E. Fisch 2016 Selected Works

Frankenstein's Monster Hits The Campaign Trail: An Approach To Regulation Of Corporate Political Expenditures, Jill E. Fisch

Jill Fisch

No abstract provided.


To Protect The Right To Vote, Look To State Courts And State Constitutions, Joshua A. Douglas 2016 University of Kentucky College of Law

To Protect The Right To Vote, Look To State Courts And State Constitutions, Joshua A. Douglas

Joshua A. Douglas

This Issue Brief details the scope of voting rights under state constitutions, an overlooked source of the right to vote. Part I considers both the lack of a federal constitutional right to vote and the explicit right mentioned in virtually all state constitutions. Part II describes recent state-level voter ID cases, providing a summary of how courts facing litigation over voter ID laws have employed their state constitutions. Part III contends that state courts, instead of simply following narrow federal jurisprudence in “lockstep,” should give broader, independent force to their explicit state constitutional provisions conferring the right to vote. Part ...


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