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A Chance To Save Lives: A Guide For How And Why The Us Should Mandate Vaccines For Children And Limit State Exemption Laws, Lauren Zidones 2021 The University of Akron

A Chance To Save Lives: A Guide For How And Why The Us Should Mandate Vaccines For Children And Limit State Exemption Laws, Lauren Zidones

Akron Law Review

Vaccines have helped increase the life expectancy for humans in the 20th century and have reduced the number of deaths associated with infectious diseases. Despite efforts by the CDC, state and local governments, and other public health agencies, infectious diseases are still a major cause of illness, disability, and death. Steps must be taken to address the continued rise of vaccine-preventable diseases in America. Eliminating or limiting state exemptions for mandatory vaccinations for school-aged children is the simplest way to address this growing issue. However, a population of parents argue for absolute parental rights and stand against any vaccine exemption ...


Motorcycle Fatality Rates Due To Head Injuries Are Lower In States With Helmet Laws, Mary E. Helander 2021 Syracuse University

Motorcycle Fatality Rates Due To Head Injuries Are Lower In States With Helmet Laws, Mary E. Helander

Lerner Center for Public Health Promotion: Population Health Research Brief Series

There are over 4,500 motorcycle crash fatalities per year in the U.S., on average. Roughly 37% of those deaths involve head injuries. Motorcycle helmet laws reduce fatalities, serious cognitive disabilities, and social costs. Yet many states have no helmet laws. This data slice shows that from 1999 to 2019, states with helmet laws had a 33% lower head-related fatality rate compared to states without helmet laws. Motorcycle helmet laws clearly save lives.


Out Of Sight, Out Of Mind: Analyzing Inhumane Practices In Mississippi’S Correctional Institutions Due To Overcrowding, Understaffing, And Diminished Funding, Ariel A. Williams 2021 University of Mississippi

Out Of Sight, Out Of Mind: Analyzing Inhumane Practices In Mississippi’S Correctional Institutions Due To Overcrowding, Understaffing, And Diminished Funding, Ariel A. Williams

Honors Theses

The purpose of this research is to examine the political, social, and economic factors which have led to inhumane conditions in Mississippi’s correctional facilities. Several methods were employed, including a comparison of the historical and current methods of funding, staffing, and rehabilitating prisoners based on literature reviews. State-sponsored reports from various departments and the legislature were analyzed to provide insight into budgetary restrictions and political will to allocate funds. Statistical surveys and data were reviewed to determine how overcrowding and understaffing negatively affect administrative capacity and prisoners’ mental and physical well-being. Ultimately, it may be concluded that Mississippi has ...


Nebraska Public Guardianship Of Unbefriended Patients: A Preliminary Review Of Health Outcomes And Cost Savings, Emily N. Berzonsky 2021 University of Nebraska Medical Center

Nebraska Public Guardianship Of Unbefriended Patients: A Preliminary Review Of Health Outcomes And Cost Savings, Emily N. Berzonsky

Capstone Experience

Unbefriended patients often experience an extended length of stay in the hospital while their medical providers await legal appointment of a public guardian to make their medical decisions. The medically unnecessary days the unbefriended patient spends in the hospital equates to high costs for the hospital, but more importantly, negative health outcomes for the patient. The purpose of this study is to provide literature and data to support recommendations for possible changes in Nebraska’s public guardianship appointment process. A literature review seeks to answer: (1) What is the median hospital length of stay for an unbefriended patient without a ...


Gravely Disabled: The Vestigial Prong Of 5150 Designations, Diane Y. Byun 2021 Cleveland State University

Gravely Disabled: The Vestigial Prong Of 5150 Designations, Diane Y. Byun

Journal of Law and Health

Effective July 1, 1972, California’s Lanterman-Petris-Short Act (“LPS Act”) set the precedent for modern mental health commitment procedures in the U.S. named after its authors, State Assemblyman Frank Lanterman and State Senators Nicholas C. Petris and Alan Short, the LPS Act sought to “end the inappropriate, indefinite, and involuntary commitment of persons with mental health disorder”; to “provide prompt evaluation and treatment of persons with mental health disorders or impaired by chronic alcoholism”; and to “guarantee and protect public safety.” Despite citing to these articles of intent, the LPS Act violates its own legislative intent through its inclusion ...


Unexpected Inequality: Disparate-Impact From Artificial Intelligence In Healthcare Decisions, Sahar Takshi 2021 Cleveland State University

Unexpected Inequality: Disparate-Impact From Artificial Intelligence In Healthcare Decisions, Sahar Takshi

Journal of Law and Health

Systemic discrimination in healthcare plagues marginalized groups. Physicians incorrectly view people of color as having high pain tolerance, leading to undertreatment. Women with disabilities are often undiagnosed because their symptoms are dismissed. Low-income patients have less access to appropriate treatment. These patterns, and others, reflect long-standing disparities that have become engrained in U.S. health systems.

As the healthcare industry adopts artificial intelligence and algorithminformed (AI) tools, it is vital that regulators address healthcare discrimination. AI tools are increasingly used to make both clinical and administrative decisions by hospitals, physicians, and insurers—yet there is no framework that specifically places ...


In Re Zhu: Implied Consent To Posthumous Sperm Retrieval, Mary Kathryn Sapp 2021 Southern Methodist University, Dedman School of Law

In Re Zhu: Implied Consent To Posthumous Sperm Retrieval, Mary Kathryn Sapp

Science and Technology Law Review

No abstract provided.


Consumer Protections In The Context Of Holistic Healthcare, Rachel Pauerstein 2021 Southern Methodist University, Dedman School of Law

Consumer Protections In The Context Of Holistic Healthcare, Rachel Pauerstein

Science and Technology Law Review

No abstract provided.


Crispr And The Future Of Fertility Innovation, June R. Carbone 2021 University of Minnesota Law School

Crispr And The Future Of Fertility Innovation, June R. Carbone

Science and Technology Law Review

No abstract provided.


070— Mental Health Parity: What It Is And Why It Matters, Lauren Klein 2021 SUNY Geneseo

070— Mental Health Parity: What It Is And Why It Matters, Lauren Klein

GREAT Day

While stigma around mental health, as well as treatment options have been drastically improved within the last decade, people who need help still are not getting it. The ultimate issue is the lack of mental health parity, which is defined by the equal treatment and benefits of other health conditions in insurance plans. Benefits such as inpatient in-network & out-of-network, co-pays, deductibles, max limit for out of pocket costs, reimbursement rates, geographic care, and coverage for any type of hospitalization. The lack of these advantages force people into difficult situations in order to receive these services. Paying abundant amounts of money ...


The Growing Use Of Mid-Level Practitioners In The Delivery Of Health Care, Taylor Pankau 2021 DePaul University College of Law

The Growing Use Of Mid-Level Practitioners In The Delivery Of Health Care, Taylor Pankau

DePaul Journal of Health Care Law

No abstract provided.


Not-For-Profit Hospitals And Managed Care Organizations: Why The 501c)(3) Tax-Exempt Status Should Be Revised, Andrew C. Papa 2021 DePaul University

Not-For-Profit Hospitals And Managed Care Organizations: Why The 501c)(3) Tax-Exempt Status Should Be Revised, Andrew C. Papa

DePaul Journal of Health Care Law

Healthcare organizations abuse the 501(c)(3) tax-exempt status—reaping tax benefits but failing to give back to their local communities in return. Congress created the 501(c)(3) tax-exempt status to benefit the poor and impoverished. Yet, not-for-profit hospitals and managed care organizations are neither required to offer services to the poor nor required to offer emergency care services to their local communities. Instead, they charge higher prices in their increasingly concentrated markets. Therefore, consumers subsidize the same not-for-profit healthcare systems that charge them higher prices.

This Article analyzes government-placed incentives under the 501(c)(3) tax-exempt status, demonstrating ...


Ethics Of Familial Genetic Genealogy: Solving Crimes At The Cost Of Privacy, Craig M. Klugman, Hector F. Rodriguez 2021 DePaul University

Ethics Of Familial Genetic Genealogy: Solving Crimes At The Cost Of Privacy, Craig M. Klugman, Hector F. Rodriguez

DePaul Journal of Health Care Law

No abstract provided.


Trade War, Ppe, And Race, Ernesto A. Hernandez-Lopez 2021 Chapman Univ. School of Law

Trade War, Ppe, And Race, Ernesto A. Hernandez-Lopez

Northwestern Journal of Law & Social Policy

Tariffs on Personal Protective Equipment (PPE), such as face masks and gloves, weaken the American response to COVID. The United States has exacerbated PPE shortages with Section 301 tariffs on these goods, part of a trade war with China. This has a disparate impact felt by minority communities because of a series of health inequity harms. COVID’s racial disparity appears in virus exposure, virus susceptibility, and COVID treatments. This Article makes legal, policy, and race-and-health arguments. Congress has delegated to the United States Trade Representative expansive authority to increase tariffs. This has made PPE supplies casualties of the trade ...


Pandemic Emotions: The Good, The Bad, And The Unconscious —Implications For Public Health, Financial Economics, Law, And Leadership, Peter H. Huang 2021 University of Colorado at Boulder

Pandemic Emotions: The Good, The Bad, And The Unconscious —Implications For Public Health, Financial Economics, Law, And Leadership, Peter H. Huang

Northwestern Journal of Law & Social Policy

Pandemics lead to emotions that can be good, bad, and unconscious. This Article offers an interdisciplinary analysis of how emotions during pandemics affect people’s responses to pandemics, public health, financial economics, law, and leadership. Pandemics are heart-breaking health crises. Crises produce emotions that impact decision-making. This Article analyzes how fear and anger over COVID-19 fueled anti-Asian and anti-Asian American hatred and racism. COVID-19 caused massive tragic economic, emotional, mental, physical, and psychological suffering. These difficulties are interconnected and lead to vicious cycles. Fear distorts people’s decision readiness, deliberation, information acquisition, risk perception, and thinking. Distortions affect people’s ...


The Scammer And The Charlatan: Regulating Health Fraudsters In The Time Of Covid-19, Brittany M. Riehm 2021 University of St. Thomas, Minnesota

The Scammer And The Charlatan: Regulating Health Fraudsters In The Time Of Covid-19, Brittany M. Riehm

University of St. Thomas Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Americans With Disabilities Act's Title Iii Public Accommodations And Its Application To Web Accessibility And Telemedicine, Priya Elayath 2021 University of St. Thomas, Minnesota

Americans With Disabilities Act's Title Iii Public Accommodations And Its Application To Web Accessibility And Telemedicine, Priya Elayath

University of St. Thomas Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Digital Health Passes In The Age Of Covid-19: Are “Vaccine Passports” Lawful And Ethical?, Lawrence O. Gostin, I. Glenn Cohen, Jana Shaw 2021 Georgetown University - Law Center - O'Neill Institute for National and Global Health Law

Digital Health Passes In The Age Of Covid-19: Are “Vaccine Passports” Lawful And Ethical?, Lawrence O. Gostin, I. Glenn Cohen, Jana Shaw

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

As COVID-19 vaccination rates in high-income countries increase, governments are proposing or implementing digital health passes (DHPs) (vaccine “passports” or “certificates”). Israel uses a “green pass” smartphone application permitting vaccinated individuals’ access to public venues (eg, gyms, hotels, entertainment). The European Union plans a “Digital Green Certificate” enabling free travel within the bloc (see eTable in the Supplement). New York is piloting an IBM “Excelsior Pass,” confirming vaccination or negative SARS-CoV-2 test status through confidential data transfers to fast-track business reopenings. This paper examines the benefits of DHPs, scientific challenges, and whether they are lawful and ethical.


End Of Life Uncertainty: Terminal Illness, Medicare Hospice Reimbursement, And The "Falsity" Of Physicians' Clinical Judgments, Jameson Steffel 2021 University of Cincinnati College of Law

End Of Life Uncertainty: Terminal Illness, Medicare Hospice Reimbursement, And The "Falsity" Of Physicians' Clinical Judgments, Jameson Steffel

University of Cincinnati Law Review

No abstract provided.


Mid-Atlantic Ethics Committee Newsletter, Spring 2021, 2021 University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law

Mid-Atlantic Ethics Committee Newsletter, Spring 2021

Mid-Atlantic Ethics Committee Newsletter

No abstract provided.


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