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The Fight Against Breast Cancer: A Policy And Programmatic Approach, Nandi Robinson 2017 The University of San Francisco

The Fight Against Breast Cancer: A Policy And Programmatic Approach, Nandi Robinson

Master's Projects and Capstones

Abstract

Breast cancer continues to remain a significant health issue for women. Previously thought to only occur among postmenopausal women, breast cancer has impacted women of different ages; and rates of breast cancer have various impacts among different ethnic groups. For women living in a toxic environment, many of them have become the new wave of breast cancer cases. Screening and detection have succeeded in decreasing mortality rates. However, more research is needed in finding an efficient method of treatment. In the effort to assist in the fight against breast cancer through a policy and programmatic angle, I am fulfilling ...


Implementing The International Health Regulations (2005) With Search Engine-Based Syndromic Surveillance, Ryan Sullivan 2017 University of Georgia School of Law

Implementing The International Health Regulations (2005) With Search Engine-Based Syndromic Surveillance, Ryan Sullivan

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


Introduction: Marijuana Laws And Federalism, Erwin Chemerinsky 2017 University of California, Irvine School of Law

Introduction: Marijuana Laws And Federalism, Erwin Chemerinsky

Boston College Law Review

No abstract provided.


Budding Conflicts: Marijuana's Impact On Unsettled Questions Of Tribal-State Relations, Katherine J. Florey 2017 UC Davis School of Law

Budding Conflicts: Marijuana's Impact On Unsettled Questions Of Tribal-State Relations, Katherine J. Florey

Boston College Law Review

In the wake of a December 2014 decision by the Department of Justice to deprioritize enforcement of federal marijuana laws against tribes as well as states, many tribes have reevaluated their policies toward marijuana. Tribal attitudes toward marijuana are diverse; some tribes regard marijuana as a public health menace, whereas others see it as a source of economic opportunity. Where tribal policies are significantly more or less restrictive than those of the surrounding state, tribal-state relations have often suffered friction. The problem is particularly acute given the jurisdictional uncertainty that characterizes Indian country and the absence of any equivalent to ...


Marijuana Legalization And Nosy Neighbor States, Alex Kreit 2017 Thomas Jefferson School of Law

Marijuana Legalization And Nosy Neighbor States, Alex Kreit

Boston College Law Review

As more states proceed with marijuana legalization laws, questions have arisen about how to accommodate those states that wish to retain prohibition. For instance, in 2014, Oklahoma and Nebraska unsuccessfully sued Colorado based on the spillover effects that Colorado’s marijuana legalization law had on its neighboring states. This article asserts that there are several reasons why state marijuana legalization laws are unlikely to have a large effect on neighboring states. First, marijuana is not a previously unobtainable good being introduced into the stream of commerce, as it is already available through the black market inexpensively. Second, legalization laws have ...


Marijuana, State Extraterritoriality, And Congress, Mark D. Rosen 2017 IIT Chicago-Kent College of Law

Marijuana, State Extraterritoriality, And Congress, Mark D. Rosen

Boston College Law Review

The Trump administration inherits the Obama administration’s policy of under-enforcing federal marijuana laws and a nation with a patchwork of divergent state laws. Although allowing diversity and experimentation, such divergence may impose spillover costs to some states. Some states may attempt to address these costs by exercising extraterritorial regulatory powers on their citizens. Although it is unclear and a matter of dispute whether and to what extent states have such extraterritorial authority, this Article shows that it is certain that Congress has power to set the bounds of state extraterritorial regulation, subject to only limited constitutional restraints. The Article ...


Beyond The Money: Expected (And Unexpected) Consequences Of America's War On Drugs, Cynthia Brown 2017 Lincoln Memorial University Duncan School of Law

Beyond The Money: Expected (And Unexpected) Consequences Of America's War On Drugs, Cynthia Brown

Lincoln Memorial University Law Review

The purpose of this paper is to provide a high-level survey of our nation’s prohibition policies within the context of the costs of the law enforcement efforts upholding those policies. The discussion will offer a cursory review of the economic expense of the war on drugs with tangential coverage of the constitutional, institutional and intangible expenses that are inseparable from an assessment of the costs of America’s drug control efforts. Part I provides a historical review of illicit drug use in the United States, while Part II supplies the evolution of the country’s efforts to codify its ...


Zika, Feminism, And The Failures Of Health Policy, Johanna Bond 2017 Washington and Lee University School of Law

Zika, Feminism, And The Failures Of Health Policy, Johanna Bond

Washington and Lee Law Review Online

The Zika epidemic caused serious concerns about fetal health throughout Latin America and some southern states in the United States. The prevailing governmental response throughout the region continues to emphasize two disease control factors: pregnancy delay and mosquito abatement. This essay argues that the current health policy approach of the World Health Organization, the Centers for Disease Control, and various national governments fails in three primary ways. First, the approach does not adequately consider the intersection of gender and poverty; thus, the current policy fails to respond to the needs of women living in poverty. Second, the health policy response ...


Saving On Health Care While Protecting The Planet: An Examination Of Massachusetts’ Proposed Carbon Tax And Its Impact On The Hospital Industry, Alexandra Shalom 2017 Boston College Law School

Saving On Health Care While Protecting The Planet: An Examination Of Massachusetts’ Proposed Carbon Tax And Its Impact On The Hospital Industry, Alexandra Shalom

Boston College Environmental Affairs Law Review

Climate change has negative implications not only for the environment, but also for human health. Human greenhouse gas (“GHG”) emissions are a major contributor to climate change and therefore we must curb our behavior to save the planet and ourselves. Following the economic principle of the First Law of Demand, a carbon tax incentivizes polluters to reduce emissions by increasing the cost of emission producing goods. British Columbia has demonstrated that carbon taxes are effective mechanisms to curb GHG emissions. Massachusetts, therefore, has proposed a carbon tax to help achieve its established GHG reduction goals. In addition, the Commonwealth’s ...


Civil Rights Policy In Practice: Provision Of Language Assistance Services In Health Care, Meredith Greene 2017 Northwestern University

Civil Rights Policy In Practice: Provision Of Language Assistance Services In Health Care, Meredith Greene

Undergraduate Research and Arts Exposition

With 80% of US hospitals seeing limited English proficient patients on a regular basis, language assistance services are a pivotal component of ensuring equal access to health care. State and federal civil rights policies guarantee the provision of language assistance services to limited English proficient hospital patients. However, local civil rights advisory committees report hospitals do not adequately comply with these policies. Through the development and analysis of an original dataset of qualitative interviews with compliance officers, language assistance services administrators, and healthcare workers from five Chicagoland health systems, this study examines what these civil rights policies look like in ...


Panel 6a Local Enforcement Efforts In Maryland: Tobacco Free Baltimore: Tobacco Enforcement, Shovaughn Chism 2017 Baltimore City Health Department

Panel 6a Local Enforcement Efforts In Maryland: Tobacco Free Baltimore: Tobacco Enforcement, Shovaughn Chism

Maryland Tobacco Control Conference

Retail tobacco compliance checks are among the most effective strategies to reduce prevent youth tobacco use. This session will highlight the retail tobacco compliance check programs in three diverse Maryland communities: Baltimore City, Baltimore County, and St. Mary’s County. Panelists will discuss the challenges facing these programs and recent successes in reducing retail violations and youth access to tobacco products. Topics will include: inspection procedures and evidence gathering, working with law enforcement, administrative bodies reducing or eliminating fines, legal challenges, and much more!


Trending @ Rwu Law: Dean Yelnosky's Post: The Path To Commencement: Maria Viveiros '17 05-08-2017, Michael Yelnosky 2017 Roger Williams University School of Law

Trending @ Rwu Law: Dean Yelnosky's Post: The Path To Commencement: Maria Viveiros '17 05-08-2017, Michael Yelnosky

Law School Blogs

No abstract provided.


Deference To The Agency Is The Best Policy: The D.C. Circuit Applies Chevron In Denying Additional Medicare Reimbursements To Provider Hospitals In Washington Regional Medicorp, Brandon Curtin 2017 Boston College Law School

Deference To The Agency Is The Best Policy: The D.C. Circuit Applies Chevron In Denying Additional Medicare Reimbursements To Provider Hospitals In Washington Regional Medicorp, Brandon Curtin

Boston College Law Review

On December 29, 2015, in Washington Regional Medicorp v. Burwell, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit held that the Secretary of Health and Human Services (“HHS”) correctly interpreted the Tax Equity and Fiscal Responsibility Act of 1982 (“TEFRA”) in calculating Medicare reimbursements for a provider hospital based on the capped target amount from the previous year. In agreeing with the Secretary, the D.C. Circuit joined the U.S. Courts of Appeals for the Third and Sixth Circuits in holding that the statute and its implementing regulations supported the Secretary. The U.S. Court ...


Do Desperate Times Really Call For Desperate Measures? The Ethical Dilemma Behind The Regulation And Use Of Experimental Drugs, Lauren Kuehn 2017 Notre Dame Law School

Do Desperate Times Really Call For Desperate Measures? The Ethical Dilemma Behind The Regulation And Use Of Experimental Drugs, Lauren Kuehn

Notre Dame Journal of International & Comparative Law

This Note will argue that, unlike what many patients believe, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) plays an invaluable and imperative role in seeking the efficacy and safety of new treatment options and drugs. The balance of interests between those who are terminally ill, who wish to see increased access to unapproved medicines; the general public, who has an interest in preserving the drug approval process; and the FDA, who has been mandated by law to safeguard the safety of the general public, creates a tension that will continue to go unresolved. Thus, the patients who continue to ...


Federalism And The End Of Obamacare, Nicholas Bagley 2017 University of Michigan Law School

Federalism And The End Of Obamacare, Nicholas Bagley

Articles

Federalism has become a watchword in the acrimonious debate over a possible replacement for the Affordable Care Act (ACA). Missing from that debate, however, is a theoretically grounded and empirically informed understanding of how best to allocate power between the federal government and the states. For health reform, the conventional arguments in favor of a national solution have little resonance: federal intervention will not avoid a race to the bottom, prevent externalities, or protect minority groups from state discrimination. Instead, federal action is necessary to overcome the states’ fiscal limitations: their inability to deficit-spend and the constraints that federal law ...


Mayhew V. Hickox: Balancing Maine's Public's Health With Personal Liberties During The Ebola "Crisis", Benjamin W. Dexter 2017 University of Maine School of Law

Mayhew V. Hickox: Balancing Maine's Public's Health With Personal Liberties During The Ebola "Crisis", Benjamin W. Dexter

Maine Law Review

By the 1960s, methods in the detection and treatment (and consequently improvements in the survival rates) of infectious diseases had advanced so significantly that "[d]iseases seemed destined to all but disappear." But the reemergence of previously "eradicated" diseases, and the emergence of new diseases that seemed all-but-untreatable, such as Ebola virus, soon put to rest the euphoria of medical advancement. Ebola virus is one of the most dangerous infectious diseases to emerge in the twentieth century, and through media sources, including movies, television shows, and new reporting, has become one of the most feared. Despite public misunderstanding regarding the ...


Rape Crisis Center Professionals' Perception Of Sexual Violence Policy: A Qualitative Analysis, Stephanie Manieri 2017 Dominican University of California

Rape Crisis Center Professionals' Perception Of Sexual Violence Policy: A Qualitative Analysis, Stephanie Manieri

Scholarly & Creative Works Conference 2017

The purpose of this study is to collect information about the perceptions of rape crisis center professionals regarding the current policies surrounding sexual violence crimes that victimize people over the age of 18. This research aims to gather information about effective and ineffective policies from professionals who are first- responders to sexual assaults.


On Hastening Death Without Violating Legal Or Moral Prohibitions, Norman L. Cantor 2017 Rutgers U. School of Law, Newark

On Hastening Death Without Violating Legal Or Moral Prohibitions, Norman L. Cantor

Norman Cantor

While the vast majority of fatally afflicted persons have a powerful wish to remain alive, some stricken persons may, for any of a host of reasons, desire to hasten death. Some persons are afflicted with chronic degenerative diseases that take a grievous toll. Chronic pain may be severe and intractable, anxiety about a future treatment regimen may be distressing, and helplessness may erode personal dignity and soil the image that the afflicted person wants to leave behind.

A dying patient’s interest in hastening death is often said to be in tension with a bedrock social principle that respect for ...


On Kamisar, Killing, And The Future Of Physician-Assisted Death, Norman L. Cantor 2017 Rutgers U. School of Law, Newark

On Kamisar, Killing, And The Future Of Physician-Assisted Death, Norman L. Cantor

Norman Cantor

In a famous 1958 article, Yale Kamisar brilliantly examined the hazards of abuse and of slippery slope extensions that subsequently, for 46 years, served to thwart legalization of physician-assisted death (PAD). This paper shows that during the same period law and culture have effectively accepted a variety of ways for stricken people to hasten death, with physicians involved in diverse roles. Those ways include rejection of nutrition and hydration, terminal sedation, administration of risky analgesics, and withholding or withdrawal of medical life support. If these existing lawful modes of hastening death were widely acknowledged, the pressure to legalize voluntary active ...


The Relation Between Autonomy-Based Rights And Profoundly Disabled Persons, Norman L. Cantor 2017 Rutgers U. School of Law, Newark

The Relation Between Autonomy-Based Rights And Profoundly Disabled Persons, Norman L. Cantor

Norman Cantor

“The Relation Between Autonomy-based Rights and Profoundly Mentally Disabled Persons” Competent persons have fundamental rights to decide about abortion, methods of contraception, and rejection of life-sustaining medical treatment. Profoundly disabled persons are so cognitively impaired that they cannot make their own serious medical decisions. Yet some courts suggest that the mentally impaired are entitled to “the same right” to choice regarding critical medical decisions as competent persons. This article discusses the puzzling question of how to relate autonomy-based rights to never-competent persons. It argues that while profoundly disabled persons cannot be entitled to make their own medical decisions, they have ...


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