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Beyond Vulnerability: Refugee Women’S Leadership In Jordan, Widad Hassan 2017 The Graduate Center, City University of New York

Beyond Vulnerability: Refugee Women’S Leadership In Jordan, Widad Hassan

All Graduate Works by Year: Dissertations, Theses, and Capstone Projects

While both men and women are affected by conflicts and humanitarian crises, 80 percent of the world’s refugees and internally displaced persons are women and children, indicating that women experience conflict and war differently. The emphasis on women’s vulnerability during conflicts and humanitarian crises leads to their exclusion from leadership roles and decision-making on humanitarian programs and issues that impact them. Though women experience numerous socio-cultural barriers to exercising leadership in humanitarian settings, they have taken on important roles in emergency response and in refugee camps. This paper traces the progress of UN and humanitarian agencies recognition and ...


Fragmented Wars: Multi-Territorial Military Operations Against Armed Groups, Noam Lubell 2017 University of Essex

Fragmented Wars: Multi-Territorial Military Operations Against Armed Groups, Noam Lubell

International Law Studies

Recent years have seen the emergence of significant legal debate surrounding the use of force against armed groups located in other States. With time, it has become clear that in many cases such operations are not confined to the territory of one other State, but expand to encompass multiple territories and often more than one armed group. This article examines multi-territorial conflicts with armed groups through the lens of several legal frameworks. Among other topics, it analyses the questions surrounding the extension of self-defense into multiple territories, the classification of the hostilities with the group and between involved States, the ...


Space Weapons And The Law, Bill Boothby 2017 U.S. Naval War College

Space Weapons And The Law, Bill Boothby

International Law Studies

Outer space is of vital importance for numerous civilian and military functions in the modern world. The idea of a space weapon involves something used, intended or designed for employment in, to or from outer space to cause injury or damage to the enemy during an armed conflict. Non-injurious, non-damaging space activities that adversely affect enemy military operations or capacity, though not involving the use of weapons, will nevertheless be methods of warfare. Article III of the Outer Space Treaty makes it clear that international law, including weapons law, applies in outer space. Accordingly, the superfluous injury/unnecessary suffering and ...


Remarks Of Dr. Douglass Cassel, Notre Dame Law School Candidate (United States), Inter-American Commission On Human Rights Special Meeting Of The Oas Permanent Council, Douglass Cassell 2017 Notre Dame Law School

Remarks Of Dr. Douglass Cassel, Notre Dame Law School Candidate (United States), Inter-American Commission On Human Rights Special Meeting Of The Oas Permanent Council, Douglass Cassell

Faculty Lectures and Presentations

Cassel briefly addresses four points:

  • First, while the Commission must process cases, that is not its only mission. The case system is a means, not an end. The goal of the Commission is to contribute to the highest possible level of respect for human rights throughout the hemisphere.
  • In addition, while the case system leads at times to adversarial relations, the proactive role is one in which the Commission and States can and should strive to work together toward common goals.
  • His third point is that we need a Commission that serves the peoples of all OAS member States.
  • Finally ...


Legal Status Of Drones Under Loac And International Law, Vivek Sehrawat 2017 Penn State Law

Legal Status Of Drones Under Loac And International Law, Vivek Sehrawat

Penn State Journal of Law & International Affairs

No abstract provided.


Prioritizing National Security At The Expense Of Refugee Rights: The Effects Of H.T. V. Land Baden-Württenberg, Thomas F. Lampert 2017 Boston College Law School

Prioritizing National Security At The Expense Of Refugee Rights: The Effects Of H.T. V. Land Baden-Württenberg, Thomas F. Lampert

Boston College International and Comparative Law Review

Tensions are high in member states of the European Union as they struggle to accommodate a record number of refugees while simultaneously confronting seemingly regular terrorist attacks. In response to this crisis, the European Court of Justice’s decision in H.T. v. Land Baden-Württenberg continued a trend that began after September 11, 2001, in which countries implement policies that diminish and threaten the rights of refugees. Specifically, the European Court of Justice ruled that legislation governing the distribution of residence permits to refugees impliedly allowed for the revocation of a residence permit from a refugee accused of terrorist activities ...


Willful Blindness Or Deliberate Indifference: The United States' Abdication Of Legal Responsibility To Refugees, Abed A. Ayoub, Yolanda C. Rondon 2017 Barry University School of Law

Willful Blindness Or Deliberate Indifference: The United States' Abdication Of Legal Responsibility To Refugees, Abed A. Ayoub, Yolanda C. Rondon

Barry Law Review

No abstract provided.


A Voice For The Voiceless: The Unpo And The Dalai Lama, Jamie N. Brandel 2017 Trinity College, Hartford Connecticut

A Voice For The Voiceless: The Unpo And The Dalai Lama, Jamie N. Brandel

Senior Theses and Projects

International organizations and international law have suffered from structural issues such as Westphalian sovereignty and submission to state interests. These inherent problems have contributed to the ongoing religious violence and occupation of Tibet since 1951, as Tibet does not qualify as a state under international law. While Tibet is not the only group of peoples who do not have access to international fora because of their stateless status, the Dalai Lama is unique in his platform and authority. The Dalai Lama has been able to take Buddhist values and intertwine them with the more familiar Western human rights concepts, promoting ...


The Updated Commentary On The First Geneva Convention – A New Tool For Generating Respect For International Humanitarian Law, Lindsey Cameron, Bruno Demeyere, Jean-Marie Henckaerts, Eve La Haye, Heike Niebergall-Lackner 2017 International Committee of the Red Cross

The Updated Commentary On The First Geneva Convention – A New Tool For Generating Respect For International Humanitarian Law, Lindsey Cameron, Bruno Demeyere, Jean-Marie Henckaerts, Eve La Haye, Heike Niebergall-Lackner

International Law Studies

Since their publication in the 1950s and the 1980s respectively, the Commentaries on the Geneva Conventions of 1949 and their Additional Protocols of 1977 have become a major reference for the application and interpretation of these treaties. The International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC), together with a team of renowned experts, is currently updating these Commentaries in order to document developments and provide up-to-date interpretations. The work on the first updated Commentary, the Commentary on the First Geneva Convention relating to the protection of the wounded and sick in the armed forces, has already been finalized. This article provides ...


Combat Losses Of Nuclear-Powered Warships: Contamination, Collateral Damage And The Law, Akira Mayama 2017 Osaka University Graduate School of International Public Policy

Combat Losses Of Nuclear-Powered Warships: Contamination, Collateral Damage And The Law, Akira Mayama

International Law Studies

There have been non-combat losses of nuclear-powered warships during sea trials and peacetime patrol missions. Nuclear contamination is spreading from some of these sinking sites. It is also conceivable that combat losses of nuclear-powered warships could cause contamination of civilians, civilian objects and the natural environment. If such combat losses occur at sea, both belligerent and neutral States will have to deal with a difficult question: to what extent and by who can harm resulting from such contamination be compensated for payment of damages. This article examines legal issues stemming from prospective combat losses of nuclear-powered warships from the perspectives ...


A Human Rights Perspective To Global Battlefield Detention: Time To Reconsider Indefinite Detention, Yuval Shany 2017 Hebrew University of Jerusalem

A Human Rights Perspective To Global Battlefield Detention: Time To Reconsider Indefinite Detention, Yuval Shany

International Law Studies

This article discusses one principal challenge to detention without trial of suspected international terrorists—the international human rights law (IHRL) norm requiring the introduction of an upper limit on the duration of security detention in order to render it not indefinite in length. Part One of this article describes the “hardline” position on security detention, adopted by the United States in the immediate aftermath of the 9/11 terror attacks (followed, with certain variations, by other countries, including the United Kingdom and the State of Israel), according to which international terrorism suspects can be deprived of their liberty without trial ...


Justice For Noncitizens: A Case For Reforming The Immigration Legal System, Anna Paden Carson 2017 Washington and Lee University

Justice For Noncitizens: A Case For Reforming The Immigration Legal System, Anna Paden Carson

VA Engage Journal

The immigration legal system exists as a function of the executive branch rather than the judicial branch, and many of the constitutional rights guaranteed in a judicial court do not continue into the immigration legal sphere. Noncitizen defendants in the immigration court system are not guaranteed the same due process rights or right to appointed counsel as United States citizens, which severely limits their chance of a successful outcome. Moreover, while many noncitizens await their trials in these courts, they are often placed in one of the 234 immigration detention facilities across the nation, which further exacerbates the direness of ...


The Limits Of Inviolability: The Parameters For Protection Of United Nations Facilities During Armed Conflict, Laurie R. Blank 2017 Emory University School of Law

The Limits Of Inviolability: The Parameters For Protection Of United Nations Facilities During Armed Conflict, Laurie R. Blank

International Law Studies

This article examines the international legal protections for United Nations humanitarian assistance and other civilian facilities during armed conflict, including under general international law, setting forth the immunities of the United Nations, and the law of armed conflict (LOAC), the relevant legal framework during wartime. Recent conflicts highlight three primary issues: (1) collateral damage to UN facilities as a consequence of strikes on military objectives nearby and military operations in the immediate vicinity; (2) the misuse of UN facilities for military purposes; and (3) direct attacks on fighters, weapons or other equipment that cause damage to such facilities. To identify ...


Legal Attitudes Of Immigrant Detainees, Emily Ryo 2017 University of Southern California

Legal Attitudes Of Immigrant Detainees, Emily Ryo

University of Southern California Legal Studies Working Paper Series

A substantial body of research shows that people’s legal attitudes can have wide-ranging behavioral consequences. In this article, I use original survey data to examine long-term immigrant detainees’ legal attitudes. I find that the majority of detainees express a felt obligation to obey the law, and do so at a significantly higher rate than other U.S. sample populations. I also find that the detainees’ perceived obligation to obey U.S. immigration authorities is significantly related to their evaluations of procedural justice, as measured by their assessments of fair treatment while in detention. This finding remains robust controlling for ...


Detention By Armed Groups Under International Law, Andrew Clapham 2017 Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies

Detention By Armed Groups Under International Law, Andrew Clapham

International Law Studies

Does international law entitle armed groups to detain people? And what obligations are imposed on such non-state actors when they do detain? This article sets out suggested obligations for armed groups related to the right to challenge the basis for any detention and considers some related issues of fair trial and punishment. The last part of this article briefly considers the legal framework governing state responsibility and individual criminal responsibility for those that assist armed groups that detain people in ways that violate international law.


Religious Symbols And The Law, Hon. Diarmuid F. O'Scannlain 2017 St. John's University School of Law

Religious Symbols And The Law, Hon. Diarmuid F. O'Scannlain

Journal of Catholic Legal Studies

No abstract provided.


The "Margin Of Appreciation" And Freedom Of Religion: Between Treaty Interpretation And Subsidiarity, Monica Lugato 2017 St. John's University School of Law

The "Margin Of Appreciation" And Freedom Of Religion: Between Treaty Interpretation And Subsidiarity, Monica Lugato

Journal of Catholic Legal Studies

No abstract provided.


Protection Against The Forced Return Of War Refugees: An Interdisciplinary Consensus On Humanitarian Non-Refoulement, Jennifer Moore 2017 Selected Works

Protection Against The Forced Return Of War Refugees: An Interdisciplinary Consensus On Humanitarian Non-Refoulement, Jennifer Moore

Jennifer Moore

This book contributes to a long-standing but ever topical debate about whether persons fleeing war to seek asylum in another country – ‘war refugees’ – are protected by international law. It seeks to add to this debate by bringing together a detailed set of analyses examining the extent to which the application of international humanitarian law (IHL) may usefully advance the legal protection of such persons. This generates a range of questions about the respective protection frameworks established under international refugee law and IHL and, specifically, the potential for interaction between them. As the first collection to deal with the subject, the ...


Refugee Law And Policy: A Comparative And International Approach, Jennifer Moore, Karen Musalo, Richard A. Boswell 2017 Selected Works

Refugee Law And Policy: A Comparative And International Approach, Jennifer Moore, Karen Musalo, Richard A. Boswell

Jennifer Moore

The fourth edition of Refugee Law and Policy, which includes all legal developments through mid-2010, provides a thoughtful scholarly analysis of refugee law, and related protections such as those available under the Convention against Torture. The book is rooted in an international law perspective, enhanced by a comparative approach. Starting with ancient precursors to asylum, the casebook portrays refugee law as dynamic across time and cultural contexts. This edition of the casebook has incorporated substantial new materials on the cutting edge area of social group claims, and their relevance to claims for protection based on gender-persecution and LGBT status. It ...


Humanitarian Law In Action Within Africa, Jennifer Moore 2017 Selected Works

Humanitarian Law In Action Within Africa, Jennifer Moore

Jennifer Moore

In Humanitarian Law in Action within Africa, Jennifer Moore studies the role and application of humanitarian law by focusing on African countries that are emerging from civil wars. Moore offers an overview of international law, including its essential vocabulary, and describes four particular subfields of international law: international humanitarian law, international human rights law, international criminal law, and international refugee law. After setting forth this overview, Moore considers practical mechanisms to implement international humanitarian law, focusing specifically on the experiences of Uganda, Sierra Leone, and Burundi. Through the case studies of these countries, Moore describes transitional justice's fundamental components ...


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