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Teachers' Perceptions Of Their Ability To Respond To Active Shooter Incidents, Carole F. Rider 2015 The University of Southern Mississippi

Teachers' Perceptions Of Their Ability To Respond To Active Shooter Incidents, Carole F. Rider

Dissertations

The purpose of this research study was to determine Mississippi high school teachers’ perceptions regarding their preparedness for an active shooter incident. The study included an extensive literature review that included background and policy context, theoretical foundations, pertinent research and professional perspectives and a worldwide timeline of school shootings. The study also included data collection and analysis, results, conclusions, recommendations for policymakers and educational leaders, and recommendations for further research.

The study was conducted to determine if there was a relationship between school planning procedures, participation in practice and drill activity, and administrator preparedness for an active shooter incident and ...


Children Of Internet Era: A Critical Analysis Of Vulnerability Of Children In The Darker Sides Of Social Media And Whatsapp, Debarati Halder Dr. 2015 NLSIU, Bangalore, Karnataka, India

Children Of Internet Era: A Critical Analysis Of Vulnerability Of Children In The Darker Sides Of Social Media And Whatsapp, Debarati Halder Dr.

Debarati Halder

Information communication technology has been made an essential part of school curriculums in India today. As per the guidelines of the, National Policy on Information and Communication technology (ICT) in school education, children must be taught the positive usage of the internet, the computer technology and digital communication technology. But internet is a double edged weapon: if it is used positively, it may yield positive results, if it is used negatively, it can create large scale devastation. It has been seen that children are often misusing the information communication technology. In the present age, children are growing up seeing their ...


, The Law School Of The Future: How The Synergies Of Convergence Will Transform The Very Notion Of “Law Schools” During The 21st Century From “Places” To “Platforms”, Jeffrey A. Van Detta 2015 Atlanta's John Marshall Law School

, The Law School Of The Future: How The Synergies Of Convergence Will Transform The Very Notion Of “Law Schools” During The 21st Century From “Places” To “Platforms”, Jeffrey A. Van Detta

Jeffrey A. Van Detta

This article discusses the disruptive change in American (and trans-national) legal education that the convergence of technology and economics is bringing to legal education. It posits, and then defends, the following assertion about "law schools of the future":

“Law schools will no longer be ‘places’ in the sense of a single faculty located on a physical campus. In the future, law schools will consist of an array of technologies and instructional techniques brought to bear, in convergence, on particular educational needs and problems.”

This paper elaborates on that prediction, discussing the ways in which technology will positively impact legal education ...


Verboten: Forbidden Homeschooling In Germany And Its Conflict With International Religious Freedom., Jacob A. Aschmutat 2015 Emory University

Verboten: Forbidden Homeschooling In Germany And Its Conflict With International Religious Freedom., Jacob A. Aschmutat

Jacob A Aschmutat

Germany maintains strict compulsory education laws that prevent families from educating their children at home. Germany strictly enforces these laws, with little regard to the families’ incentives to remove their children from the public schools. As such, these laws contain no exemption for families interested in homeschooling for religious purposes. The absence of such an exemption seems to contradict the internationally recognized right to religious freedom, a right concretely granted through three international treaties that Germany has both signed and ratified.

Several decisions by the European Court of Human Rights give little to no credence to the notion of religious ...


Lifeguard Supervision For K-12 Swim Physical Education Classes, Catherine L. Rucker 2015 Golden Gate University School of Law

Lifeguard Supervision For K-12 Swim Physical Education Classes, Catherine L. Rucker

Catherine L Rucker

In California, K-12 schools with swimming pools are able to provide swim physical education classes without lifeguard supervision. This is because the Health & Safety Code only requires lifeguard supervision for public pools that charge a "direct fee." As a result, some schools are conducting swim pe classes - that are only supervised by one physical education teacher. And the teacher may or may not have additional safety training. Unfortunately, drownings and near-drownings have occurred in school swim pe classes in California.

In order to ensure student safety, this resolution would require that a K-12 school can only offer a swim pe ...


Funding Programs That Work: Lessons From The Federal Home Visiting Program, Philip G. Peters Jr. 2015 University of Missouri

Funding Programs That Work: Lessons From The Federal Home Visiting Program, Philip G. Peters Jr.

Philip G. Peters Jr.

Congress spends hundreds of billions of dollars each year on social programs. Many don’t work. Congress and the President have called for greater reliance on evidence-based programs. Thus far, however, only one major federal program conditions state access to formula-based federal funding on the use of evidence-based practices--the Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program. In this Article, I examine the extent to which this initial effort has succeeded, concluding that Congress has taken a promising first step, but that attainment of its objective will require more demanding proof standards than those contained in the current Home Visiting ...


Experiential Education And Our Divided Campuses: What Delivers Practice Value To Big Law Associates, Government Attorneys, And Public Interest Lawyers?, Margaret E. Reuter, Joanne Ingham 2015 Indiana University - Bloomington

Experiential Education And Our Divided Campuses: What Delivers Practice Value To Big Law Associates, Government Attorneys, And Public Interest Lawyers?, Margaret E. Reuter, Joanne Ingham

Margaret E. Reuter

How will law schools meet the challenge of expanding their education in lawyering skills as demanded from critics and now required by the ABA? This article examines the details of the experiential coursework (clinic, field placement, and skills courses) of 2,142 attorneys. It reveals that experiential courses have not been comparably pursued or valued by former law students as they headed to careers in different settings and types of law practice. Public interest lawyers took many of these types of courses, at intensive levels, and valued them highly. In marked contrast, corporate lawyers in large firms took far fewer ...


Gentrification And Urban Public School Reforms: The Interest Divergence Dillema, Erika Wilson 2015 University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Gentrification And Urban Public School Reforms: The Interest Divergence Dillema, Erika Wilson

Erika K. Wilson

Across the country cities are experiencing rapid increases in gentrification: the influx of middle-class, often white residents, into cities with large minority populations. In some gentrifying cities, significant numbers of white middle-class residents are enrolling their children in city public schools, reversing a long standing trend of white flight out of city schools. Local officials value the renewed interest in public schools by these residents because it represents an opportunity to keep them, and their tax dollars, from fleeing to the suburbs once they have school aged children.

This Article chronicles the ways in which local officials in gentrifying cities ...


Following Fisher: Narrowly Tailoring Affirmative Action, Eang L. Ngov 2015 The Catholic University of America, Columbus School of Law

Following Fisher: Narrowly Tailoring Affirmative Action, Eang L. Ngov

Catholic University Law Review

Affirmative action has been at the forefront of educational policies and to this day continues to enliven debates. For decades, schools have litigated over whether affirmative action can be used to create a diverse student body. Now, the litigation has shifted to whether affirmative action policies are narrowly tailored. The Supreme Court’s most recent affirmative action case, Fisher v. University of Texas at Austin, requires that schools prove that there are no workable race neutral alternatives in order to demonstrate that their affirmative action programs are narrowly tailored. This article examines the available race neutral alternatives: percentage plans; socioeconomic ...


Whose Best Interest Is It Anyway?: School Administrators' Liability For Student Injury In Virginia, Alison Landry 2015 The Catholic University of America, Columbus School of Law

Whose Best Interest Is It Anyway?: School Administrators' Liability For Student Injury In Virginia, Alison Landry

Catholic University Law Review

In 2012 the Supreme Court of Virginia declined to recognize a special relationship between a school’s vice principal and the school’s students. Without the third person liability that accompanies special relationships, a vice principal is allowed to put student safety at the bottom of his to-do list. This Note analyzes why the Supreme Court of Virginia’s decision in Burns v. Gagnon should have found that a special relationship existed between a vice principal and his students. Declining to recognize this special relationship has left school administrators with little risk of liability for a student’s harm. This ...


Ferguson, The Rebellious Law Professor, And The Neoliberal University, Harold A. McDougall III 2015 Howard University School of law

Ferguson, The Rebellious Law Professor, And The Neoliberal University, Harold A. Mcdougall Iii

Harold A. McDougall III

Neoliberalism, a business-oriented ideology promoting corporatism, profit-seeking, and elite management, has found its way into the modern American university. As neoliberal ideology envelops university campuses, the idea of law professors as learned academicians and advisors to students as citizens in training, has given way to the concept of professors as brokers of marketable skills with students as consumers. In a legal setting, this concept pushes law students to view their education not as a means to contribute to society and the professional field, but rather as a means to make money. These developments are especially problematic for minority students and ...


Mother May I? No, You May Not! Parental Consent Requirements For Students To Participate In Student-Led Clubs At Public Schools, Kelly A. Sherrill Linkous 2015 The George Washington University

Mother May I? No, You May Not! Parental Consent Requirements For Students To Participate In Student-Led Clubs At Public Schools, Kelly A. Sherrill Linkous

Kelly A. Sherrill Linkous

This article considers the constitutionality of laws or policies requiring parental consent for student participation in school-based clubs or organizations, along with their consistency with the language in the federal Equal Access Act. It weighs the dueling parental right to direct the upbringing of their children against students’ constitutional speech and religious exercise rights within the schoolhouse gate. As a vehicle to analyze the constitutionality of all similarly-worded state laws and school district policies, the article examines a Georgia statute mandating parental consent for student participation in clubs. The Georgia statute is similar to Oklahoma’s and Utah’s statutes ...


Show And Tell?: Students' Personal Lives, Schools, And Parents, Emily Gold Waldman 2015 Pace University School of Law

Show And Tell?: Students' Personal Lives, Schools, And Parents, Emily Gold Waldman

Pace Law Faculty Publications

Public schools learn about their students' personal lives in many ways. Some are passive: a teacher observes a student kissing someone, or overhears a conversation among friends. But schools also engage in more active information-gathering about students' personal lives, through surveys and informal conversations between students and teachers, administrators, school psychologists, counselors, coaches, and other personnel. This Article explores the competing privacy considerations that result from such encounters. Once schools have learned highly personal information about their students, does it violate those students' privacy rights to disclose that information to their parents? Or does keeping the information secret violate the ...


Transformative Teaching And Educational Fair Use After Georgia State, Brandon C. Butler 2015 American University Washington College of Law

Transformative Teaching And Educational Fair Use After Georgia State, Brandon C. Butler

Brandon C. Butler

The Supreme Court has said that copyright’s fair use doctrine is a “First Amendment safety valve” because it ensures that certain crucial cultural activities are not unduly burdened by copyright. While many such activities (criticism, commentary, parody) have benefited from the courts’ increased attention to first amendment values, one such activity, education, has been mired for years in a minimalist, market-based vision of fair use that is largely out of touch with mainstream fair use jurisprudence. The latest installment in the history of educational fair use, the 11th Circuit’s opinion in the Georgia State e-reserves case, may be ...


Cracking Open The Classroom Door: Developing A First Amendment Standard For Curricular Speech, Nicholas K. Tygesson 2015 Northwestern University School of Law

Cracking Open The Classroom Door: Developing A First Amendment Standard For Curricular Speech, Nicholas K. Tygesson

Northwestern University Law Review

No abstract provided.


Cocktails On Campus: Are Libations A Liability?, Susan S. Bendlin 2015 Barry University

Cocktails On Campus: Are Libations A Liability?, Susan S. Bendlin

Susan S. Bendlin

ABSTRACT: By Susan S. Bendlin

An estimated 1,825 college students die each year from alcohol-related, unintentional injuries. Roughly 599,000 students between the ages of 18 and 24 are injured every year while under the influence of alcohol. Tales of intoxicated college students’ wild, disgusting, and often violent behavior have made the national news. Litigation over alcohol-related incidents on college campuses arises from various situations, including injuries that result from intoxicated students falling, injuries suffered during parties and hazing rituals involving alcohol, and injuries from other assaults that occur after alcohol has been consumed on campus.

At the outset ...


Court-Led Educational Reforms In Political Third Rails: Lessons From The Litigation Over Ultra-Religious Jewish Schools In Israel, Lotem Perry Dr. 2015 University of Haifa

Court-Led Educational Reforms In Political Third Rails: Lessons From The Litigation Over Ultra-Religious Jewish Schools In Israel, Lotem Perry Dr.

Dr. Lotem Perry-Hazan

This paper offers a model for evaluating the strengths and weaknesses of judicial involvement in educational reforms. It uses the model to analyze two case studies of court-led educational reforms in the third rail of Israeli politics –– the curricula and the admission policies of ultra-Othodox (Haredi) schools. These case studies are located at the knotty junction of human rights, religion, and politics in education policy, generating concern in many countries. The conclusions demonstrate that that even when the courts are cautious, judicial involvement in third rail educational reforms may produce impacts that drive the cogwheels of policy-making in directions that ...


Freedom Of Speech In Schools And The Right To Participation: When The First Amendment Encounters The Convention On The Rights Of The Child, Lotem Perry Dr. 2015 University of Haifa

Freedom Of Speech In Schools And The Right To Participation: When The First Amendment Encounters The Convention On The Rights Of The Child, Lotem Perry Dr.

Dr. Lotem Perry-Hazan

The rights to both free speech and participation present two normative frameworks for analyzing children's expressions in school. This Article examines the differences between these normative frameworks, to explore how they apply in different situations, and to assist in shaping just and educative policies for coping with children's controversial expressions in school. The data sources are 56 American cases concerning school children's free speech. The analysis highlights the distinctions between participatory and non-participatory expressions in educational environments. The right to participation captures only expressions that have a dialogic character, which are also supported by stronger justifications. The ...


Can Universal Pre-K Overcome Extreme Race And Income Segregation To Reach New York’S Neediest Children? The Importance Of Legal Infrastructure And The Limits Of The Law , Natalie Gomez-Velez 2015 City University of New York School of Law

Can Universal Pre-K Overcome Extreme Race And Income Segregation To Reach New York’S Neediest Children? The Importance Of Legal Infrastructure And The Limits Of The Law , Natalie Gomez-Velez

Cleveland State Law Review

This article will examine New York City and State’s current universal pre-kindergarten efforts as related to social goals of serving low-income children in segregated schools to address inequality and close opportunity gaps. It also will examine the educational goals of enhancing cognitive gains and improving school readiness for all children. Part I considers pre-kindergarten in a climate of extreme segregation by race and class and in the context of current technocratic education reforms operating against a backdrop of diminished legal remedies for the harms of race and class segregation and inequality. Part II examines pre-kindergarten, with a focus on ...


“Jim Crowing” Plyler V. Doe: The Resegregation Of Undocumented Students In American Higher Education Through Discriminatory State Tuition And Fee Legislation, David H.K. Nguyen, Zelideh R. Martinez Hoy 2015 Indiana University Bloomington

“Jim Crowing” Plyler V. Doe: The Resegregation Of Undocumented Students In American Higher Education Through Discriminatory State Tuition And Fee Legislation, David H.K. Nguyen, Zelideh R. Martinez Hoy

Cleveland State Law Review

This law review article examines the re-segregation of undocumented students in education, more specifically, re-segregation through state laws and policies impacting their attendance at American colleges and universities. Under no fault of their own, undocumented students are marginalized even further after graduating from high school, since they are not afforded the same benefits as their peers to attend college. This article explores the current landscape of these laws and policies after providing background on Plyler v. Doe and state and federal attempts to challenge education for undocumented students.


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