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Cocktails On Campus: Are Libations A Liability?, Susan S. Bendlin 2015 SelectedWorks

Cocktails On Campus: Are Libations A Liability?, Susan S. Bendlin

Susan S. Bendlin

ABSTRACT: By Susan S. Bendlin

An estimated 1,825 college students die each year from alcohol-related, unintentional injuries. Roughly 599,000 students between the ages of 18 and 24 are injured every year while under the influence of alcohol. Tales of intoxicated college students’ wild, disgusting, and often violent behavior have made the national news. Litigation over alcohol-related incidents on college campuses arises from various situations, including injuries that result from intoxicated students falling, injuries suffered during parties and hazing rituals involving alcohol, and injuries from other assaults that occur after alcohol has been consumed on campus.

At the outset ...


Website Blocked: Filtering Technology In Schools And School Libraries, Jennifer M. Overaa 2014 San José State University

Website Blocked: Filtering Technology In Schools And School Libraries, Jennifer M. Overaa

SLIS Student Research Journal

This paper investigates the impact of filtering software in K-12 schools and school libraries. The Children's Internet Protection Act, or CIPA, requires that public schools and school libraries use filtering technology in order to receive discounted rates on technology. As a result, nearly all public elementary and secondary schools today use filtering technology. While the provisions of CIPA narrowly define the content to be blocked, filters are often set to block much more than is required. Filtering technology is often ineffective, and many unobjectionable sites end up being blocked, including Web 2.0 sites and tools needed to educate ...


Discharging Student Loans Via Bankruptcy: Undue Hardship Doctrine In The First Circuit, Anthony Bowers 2014 University of Massachusetts School of Law

Discharging Student Loans Via Bankruptcy: Undue Hardship Doctrine In The First Circuit, Anthony Bowers

University of Massachusetts Law Review

Student loans are presumptively non-dischargeable through bankruptcy, but the undue hardship doctrine provides an equitable “safety valve” for the indigent. To date, the United States First Circuit Court of Appeals has yet to select a single legal test for determining undue hardship under the United States Bankruptcy Code (“Bankruptcy Code”). Within the jurisdiction of the First Circuit, bankruptcy courts are free to choose an approach to evaluate undue hardship. In an effort to ensure consistency throughout the bankruptcy courts within the First Circuit, it would be ideal if the First Circuit would choose one of the undue hardship tests. However ...


The Week After, Lawrence K. Karlton 2014 Touro College Jacob D. Fuchsberg Law Center

The Week After, Lawrence K. Karlton

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.


Scholarly And Scientific Boycotts Of Israel: Abusing The Academic Enterprise, Kenneth Lasson 2014 Touro College Jacob D. Fuchsberg Law Center

Scholarly And Scientific Boycotts Of Israel: Abusing The Academic Enterprise, Kenneth Lasson

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.


To Yoder Or Not To Yoder? How The Spending Clause Holding In National Federation Of Independent Business V. Sebelius Can Be Used To Challenge The No Child Left Behind Act, Christopher Roma 2014 Pace University

To Yoder Or Not To Yoder? How The Spending Clause Holding In National Federation Of Independent Business V. Sebelius Can Be Used To Challenge The No Child Left Behind Act, Christopher Roma

Pace Law Review

States such as California, Texas, Montana, Nebraska and Pennsylvania all have either declined to apply for waivers out of the testing, accountability, and penalty schemes of No Child Left Behind; or, have had their applications rejected by the Department of Education. This Article argues that these states would have a legitimate challenge to NCLB as unconstitutionally coercive based on the precedent of Sebelius. As discussed more in the sections that follow, not only is NCLB and Title I the largest federal funding program behind Medicaid, it also shares many of the characteristics that the opinions in Sebelius found to be ...


Duty-Bearers For Positive Rights, Jeremy Waldron 2014 NELLCO

Duty-Bearers For Positive Rights, Jeremy Waldron

New York University Public Law and Legal Theory Working Papers

Claims about social and economic rights (as a kind of human right) are often criticized because they fail to specify who are the bearers of the corresponding duties. We usually say that states are the duty-bearers, but it may not be possible for a poor state to bear the burden of these rights. And anyway it may be a mistake to focus exclusively on states in an age of globalization. This paper uses some analytic ideas from the 1970s and 1980s to address this problem. Drawing on the work of Neil MacCormick and Joseph Raz, it argues that it is ...


Recognizing Education Rights In India And The United States: All Roads Lead To The Courts?, Ashley Feasley 2014 Pace University

Recognizing Education Rights In India And The United States: All Roads Lead To The Courts?, Ashley Feasley

Pace International Law Review

The approaches of United States and India take disparate form: India has recognized the right to education and is attempting to implement the right, whereas the United States has not formally recognized the right to education itself but has acknowledged a limited right to educational opportunity, but has implemented some sort of right to education unequally by relying on the states to guarantee and implement some kind of remedy. This paper aims to evaluate the American and Indian approaches towards the right to education. Section II discusses the interrelatedness of social and economic and civil and political rights and the ...


Opening The Schoolhouse Gate: Why The Supreme Court Should Adopt The Standard Announced In Tatro V. Supreme Court Of Minnesota To Permit The Regulation Of Non-Curricular Student Speech In Professional Programs, Mark A. Cloutier 2014 Boston College Law School

Opening The Schoolhouse Gate: Why The Supreme Court Should Adopt The Standard Announced In Tatro V. Supreme Court Of Minnesota To Permit The Regulation Of Non-Curricular Student Speech In Professional Programs, Mark A. Cloutier

Boston College Law Review

Free speech in public schools has long been a divisive and intriguing issue. The topic is particularly contentious in post-secondary education where many of the maturity-driven and family surrogate rationales for restricting student speech fall away. Furthermore, with the advent of the Internet and the explosion of social media, it is now nearly impossible to draw a meaningful line between student speech rights on school grounds and student speech rights beyond them. This Note examines what happens when a student enrolled in a post-secondary program violates an established code of conduct or professional ethics using a non-curricular form of Internet ...


Removing Arbitrary Handicaps: Protecting The Right To Education In Horváth And Kiss V. Hungary, Kerime Sule Akoglu 2014 Boston College Law School

Removing Arbitrary Handicaps: Protecting The Right To Education In Horváth And Kiss V. Hungary, Kerime Sule Akoglu

Boston College International and Comparative Law Review

On January 29, 2013, in Horváth and Kiss v. Hungary, the European Court of Human Rights held that educational testing in Hungary violated the European Convention on Human Rights. The court found that the tests used in Hungary had a disproportionate effect on the Roma population and that the state has a positive obligation to remedy such practices. This Comment argues that the imposition of positive obligations on states to provide safeguards for disadvantaged groups, like the Roma, is an effective method to correct a troubled history of racial segregation in public schools. This Comment also argues that without such ...


Religion And The Equal Protection Clause: Why The Constitution Requires School Vouchers, Steven G. Calabresi, Abe Salander 2014 University of Florida Levin College of Law

Religion And The Equal Protection Clause: Why The Constitution Requires School Vouchers, Steven G. Calabresi, Abe Salander

Florida Law Review

Ask anyone whether the Constitution permits discrimination on the basis of religion, and the response will undoubtedly be no. Yet the modern Supreme Court has not recognized that the antidiscrimination command of the Fourteenth Amendment protects religion in the same way that the Amendment protects against discrimination on the basis of race or gender. In fact, the Supreme Court has permitted the legislature to facially discriminate against religion in funding programs. To make matters worse, thirty-seven state constitutions and the District of Columbia’s Code openly discriminate on the basis of religion in so-called Blaine Amendments.


The Internet Is The New Public Forum: Why Riley V. California Supports Net Neutrality, Adam Lamparello 2014 SelectedWorks

The Internet Is The New Public Forum: Why Riley V. California Supports Net Neutrality, Adam Lamparello

Adam Lamparello

Technology has ushered civil liberties into the virtual world, and the law must adapt by providing legal protections to individuals who speak, assemble, and associate in that world. The original purposes of the First Amendment, which from time immemorial have protected civil liberties and preserved the free, open, and robust exchange of information, support net neutrality. After all, laws or practices that violate cherished freedoms in the physical world also violate those freedoms in the virtual world. The battle over net neutrality is “is absolutely the First Amendment issue of our time,” just as warrantless searches of cell phones were ...


Guaranteed To Work Or It's Free!: The Evolution Of Student Loan Discharge In Bankruptcy And The Ninth Circuit's Ruling In Hedlund V. Educational Resources Institute, Inc., Richard B. Keeton 2014 SelectedWorks

Guaranteed To Work Or It's Free!: The Evolution Of Student Loan Discharge In Bankruptcy And The Ninth Circuit's Ruling In Hedlund V. Educational Resources Institute, Inc., Richard B. Keeton

Richard B Keeton

This article explores the topic of student loan discharge in bankruptcy and also discusses what precedent the Ninth Circuit's holding in Hedlund v. Educational Resources Institute Inc. sets for the future. In order to rationally analyze the effect of Hedlund, this article sets forth the basic foundation of knowledge necessary to understand student loans in general along with the bankruptcy process when educational loans are in question. Additionally, it gives a brief, easy to understand history of federal student loans, which sets the context for analyzing today’s student loan options. Further, this article discusses the evolution of tests ...


University Ip And The Team Production Model: Why Change What’S Not Broken?, Samuel Estreicher, Kristina A. Yost 2014 NELLCO

University Ip And The Team Production Model: Why Change What’S Not Broken?, Samuel Estreicher, Kristina A. Yost

New York University Public Law and Legal Theory Working Papers

This chapter focuses on intellectual property (“IP”) issues in the university setting. Often, universities require faculty who have been hired in whole or in part to invent to assign inventions created within the scope of their employment to the university. In addition, the most effective way to secure compliance with the Bayh-Dole Act, which deals with ownership of inventions involving federally funded research, is for the university to take title to such inventions. Failure to specify who has title can result in title passing to the government. The university then decides whether to process a patent application, and if it ...


University Ip And The Team Production Model: Why Change What’S Not Broken?, Samuel Estreicher, Kristina A. Yost 2014 NELLCO

University Ip And The Team Production Model: Why Change What’S Not Broken?, Samuel Estreicher, Kristina A. Yost

New York University Law and Economics Working Papers

This chapter focuses on intellectual property (“IP”) issues in the university setting. Often, universities require faculty who have been hired in whole or in part to invent to assign inventions created within the scope of their employment to the university. In addition, the most effective way to secure compliance with the Bayh-Dole Act, which deals with ownership of inventions involving federally funded research, is for the university to take title to such inventions. Failure to specify who has title can result in title passing to the government. The university then decides whether to process a patent application, and if it ...


Not So Black And White: The Third Circuit Upholds Race-Conscious Redistricting In Doe Ex Rel Doe V. Lower Merion School District, Alexandra Muolo 2014 Villanova University School of Law

Not So Black And White: The Third Circuit Upholds Race-Conscious Redistricting In Doe Ex Rel Doe V. Lower Merion School District, Alexandra Muolo

Villanova Law Review

No abstract provided.


Exception Perception: The Third Circuit's Strict View Of The Exceptions To The Statute Of Limitations Under The Individuals With Disabilities Education Act, Samantha Peruto 2014 Villanova University School of Law

Exception Perception: The Third Circuit's Strict View Of The Exceptions To The Statute Of Limitations Under The Individuals With Disabilities Education Act, Samantha Peruto

Villanova Law Review

No abstract provided.


Freedom Of Religion In Public Schools In Germany And In The United States, Inke Muehlhoff 2014 University of Georgia School of Law

Freedom Of Religion In Public Schools In Germany And In The United States, Inke Muehlhoff

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


Educating The Undocumented: Providing Legal Status For Undocumented Students In The United States And Italy Through Higher Education, Laura J. Callahan Ragan 2014 University of Georgia School of Law

Educating The Undocumented: Providing Legal Status For Undocumented Students In The United States And Italy Through Higher Education, Laura J. Callahan Ragan

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


Learning Lessons From Multani: Considering Canada's Response To Religious Garb Issues In Public Schools, Allison N. Crawford 2014 University of Georgia School of Law

Learning Lessons From Multani: Considering Canada's Response To Religious Garb Issues In Public Schools, Allison N. Crawford

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


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