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Fiat Lux: Tracing A Standard Of Review For Class Certification Orders, Curtis E.A. Karnow 2016 California Superior Court (San Francisco)

Fiat Lux: Tracing A Standard Of Review For Class Certification Orders, Curtis E.A. Karnow

Curtis E.A. Karnow

 An historical investigation of California’s  standards of review  of class certification orders, together with an analysis of the standard and its implications for the practical work of trial judges and lawyers litigating class actions. The article concludes by emphasizing the role of the trial plan in certification motions.


Monopolies In Multidistrict Litigation, Elizabeth Chamblee Burch 2016 University of Georgia School of Law

Monopolies In Multidistrict Litigation, Elizabeth Chamblee Burch

Elizabeth Chamblee Burch

When transferee judges receive a multidistrict proceeding, they select a few lead plaintiffs’ lawyers to efficiently manage litigation and settlement negotiations. That decision gives those attorneys total control over all plaintiffs’ claims and rewards them richly in common-benefit fees. It’s no surprise then that these are coveted positions, yet empirical evidence confirms that the same attorneys occupy them time and again. When asked, repeat players chalk it up to their experience and skill—no one can manage and negotiate as well as they can. Off the record, however, any plaintiff’s lawyer who’s been involved in multidistrict litigation ...


Is The Supreme Court Disabling The Enabling Act, Or Is Shady Grove Just Another Bad Opera?, Robert J. Condlin 2016 University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law

Is The Supreme Court Disabling The Enabling Act, Or Is Shady Grove Just Another Bad Opera?, Robert J. Condlin

Faculty Scholarship

After seventy years of trying, the Supreme Court has yet to agree on whether the Rules Enabling Act articulates a one or two part standard for determining the validity of a Federal Rule. Is it enough that a Federal Rule regulates “practice and procedure,” or must it also not “abridge substantive rights”? The Enabling Act seems to require both, but the Court is not so sure, and the costs of its uncertainty are real. Among other things, litigants must guess whether the decision to apply a Federal Rule in a given case will depend upon predictable ritual, judicial power grab ...


Forum Selling, Daniel M. Klerman, Greg Reilly 2016 USC Law School

Forum Selling, Daniel M. Klerman, Greg Reilly

University of Southern California Legal Studies Working Paper Series

Forum shopping is problematic because it may lead to forum selling. For diverse motives, including prestige, local benefits, or re-election, some judges want to hear more cases. When plaintiffs have wide choice of forum, such judges have incentives to make the law more pro-plaintiff, because plaintiffs choose the court. While only a few judges may be motivated to attract more cases, their actions can have large effects, because their courts will attract a disproportionate share of cases. For example, judges in the Eastern District of Texas have distorted the rules and practices relating to case assignment, joinder, discovery, transfer, and ...


#Rule23 #Classaction #Notice: Using Social Media, Text Messaging, And Other New Communications Technology For Class Action Notice And Returning To Rule 23(C)(2)(B)'S "Best Notice Practicable" Standard, Elizabeth M.C. Scheibel 2016 Mitchell Hamline School of Law

#Rule23 #Classaction #Notice: Using Social Media, Text Messaging, And Other New Communications Technology For Class Action Notice And Returning To Rule 23(C)(2)(B)'S "Best Notice Practicable" Standard, Elizabeth M.C. Scheibel

Mitchell Hamline Law Review

No abstract provided.


Learning Intentionally And The Metacognitive Task, Patti Alleva, Jennifer A. Gundlach 2016 Maurice A. Deane School of Law at Hofstra University

Learning Intentionally And The Metacognitive Task, Patti Alleva, Jennifer A. Gundlach

Hofstra Law Faculty Scholarship

[T]his article begins by suggesting why civil procedure doctrine is so challenging to teach and learn, noting how the symposium pieces help to tackle those challenges. Then, we join the growing number of law professors who advocate that learning how to learn deserves greater attention in the law school curriculum, given the importance of learning to law students and lawyers alike. In particular, to round out the teaching approaches of our authors, we suggest that law schools should do more to demonstrate respect for the process of learning as an end in itself.13 We especially extol the use ...


Apuntes Sobre Los Requisitos De Admisibilidad De La Casación Civil Alemana, José Balcázar Quiroz 2016 Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú

Apuntes Sobre Los Requisitos De Admisibilidad De La Casación Civil Alemana, José Balcázar Quiroz

José Balcázar Quiroz

No abstract provided.


Rethinking Adequacy Of Representation, Jay Tidmarsh 2016 Notre Dame Law School

Rethinking Adequacy Of Representation, Jay Tidmarsh

Jay Tidmarsh

This article questions the usefulness of traditional tests for adequacy of representation in class action proceedings. When determining whether to certify a class, courts have sought to avoid endorsing those classes marred by conflicting interests or the possibility of collusion. Yet, such conflicts of interest are an intrinsic characteristic of class actions, stemming from the very policy rationales that have prompted the judiciary to allow litigation by classes. As a result, the current doctrine of adequate representation has left the courts without a bright-line rule; instead, the courts' inquiries into adequacy of representation must focus primarily on the degree of ...


Resurrecting Trial By Statistics, Jay Tidmarsh 2016 Notre Dame Law School

Resurrecting Trial By Statistics, Jay Tidmarsh

Jay Tidmarsh

“Trial by statistics” was a means by which a court could resolve a large number of aggregated claims: a court could try a random sample of claim, and extrapolate the average result to the remainder. In Wal-Mart, Inc. v. Dukes, the Supreme Court seemingly ended the practice at the federal level, thus removing from judges a tool that made mass aggregation more feasible. After examining the benefits and drawbacks of trial by statistics, this Article suggests an alternative that harnesses many of the positive features of the technique while avoiding its major difficulties. The technique is the “presumptive judgment”: a ...


Procedure, Substance, And Erie, Jay Tidmarsh 2016 Notre Dame Law School

Procedure, Substance, And Erie, Jay Tidmarsh

Jay Tidmarsh

This Article examines the relationship between procedure and substance, and the way in which that relationship affects Erie questions. It first suggests that "procedure" should be understood in terms of process-in other words, in terms of the way that it changes the substance of the law and the value of legal claims. It then argues that the traditional view that the definitions of "procedure" and "substance" change with the context-a pillar on which present Erie analysis is based-is wrong. Finally, it suggests a single process based principle that reconciles all of the Supreme Court's "procedural Erie" cases: that federal ...


Rethinking Adequacy Of Representation, Jay Tidmarsh 2016 Notre Dame Law School

Rethinking Adequacy Of Representation, Jay Tidmarsh

Jay Tidmarsh

This article questions the usefulness of traditional tests for adequacy of representation in class action proceedings. When determining whether to certify a class, courts have sought to avoid endorsing those classes marred by conflicting interests or the possibility of collusion. Yet, such conflicts of interest are an intrinsic characteristic of class actions, stemming from the very policy rationales that have prompted the judiciary to allow litigation by classes. As a result, the current doctrine of adequate representation has left the courts without a bright-line rule; instead, the courts' inquiries into adequacy of representation must focus primarily on the degree of ...


Resurrecting Trial By Statistics, Jay Tidmarsh 2016 Notre Dame Law School

Resurrecting Trial By Statistics, Jay Tidmarsh

Jay Tidmarsh

“Trial by statistics” was a means by which a court could resolve a large number of aggregated claims: a court could try a random sample of claim, and extrapolate the average result to the remainder. In Wal-Mart, Inc. v. Dukes, the Supreme Court seemingly ended the practice at the federal level, thus removing from judges a tool that made mass aggregation more feasible. After examining the benefits and drawbacks of trial by statistics, this Article suggests an alternative that harnesses many of the positive features of the technique while avoiding its major difficulties. The technique is the “presumptive judgment”: a ...


Procedure, Substance, And Erie, Jay Tidmarsh 2016 Notre Dame Law School

Procedure, Substance, And Erie, Jay Tidmarsh

Jay Tidmarsh

This Article examines the relationship between procedure and substance, and the way in which that relationship affects Erie questions. It first suggests that "procedure" should be understood in terms of process-in other words, in terms of the way that it changes the substance of the law and the value of legal claims. It then argues that the traditional view that the definitions of "procedure" and "substance" change with the context-a pillar on which present Erie analysis is based-is wrong. Finally, it suggests a single process based principle that reconciles all of the Supreme Court's "procedural Erie" cases: that federal ...


Twombly And Iqbal At The State Level, Roger Michalski, Abby Wood 2016 Brooklyn Law School

Twombly And Iqbal At The State Level, Roger Michalski, Abby Wood

University of Southern California Legal Studies Working Paper Series

This paper contributes to the empirical literature on pleading standards by studying the effect of Twombly and Iqbal at the state level. States account for the majority of civil litigation, yet they are understudied doctrinally and empirically. When we consider pleading at the state level, we can leverage differences across space and time in a way that is impossible with studies of federal courts. Using an array of principled empirical approaches on the best-available data, we find no evidence that raising pleading standards affected plaintiff behavior. We observe no decrease in filings and no significant change in complaint length, number ...


To Waive Or Not To Waive? Filing Deadlines And Hearing Requests In Administrative Adjudications, Alice Booher Johnson 2016 Pepperdine University

To Waive Or Not To Waive? Filing Deadlines And Hearing Requests In Administrative Adjudications, Alice Booher Johnson

Journal of the National Association of Administrative Law Judiciary

In Part II of this Article, I provide an overview of subject matter jurisdiction in relation to filing timeframes. I review the distinction between original and appellate jurisdiction using Maryland case law and a sample survey of other state case law to provide background to the question of filing deadlines and hearing requests in administrative adjudications. In Part III of this Article, I elaborate upon Supreme Court precedent on administrative filing deadlines. In Part IV of this Article, I analyze the nature of filing deadlines for hearing requests before various state agencies, with an emphasis on Maryland’s scheme. The ...


Hague Convention On The Law Applicable To Products Liability, Bryant Durham 2016 University of Georgia School of Law

Hague Convention On The Law Applicable To Products Liability, Bryant Durham

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


Disclosure And The Incurious Attorneys, William F. Cahill, B.A., LL.B., J.C.D. 2016 St. John's University School of Law

Disclosure And The Incurious Attorneys, William F. Cahill, B.A., Ll.B., J.C.D.

The Catholic Lawyer

No abstract provided.


Clapper Dethroned: Imminent Injury And Standing For Data Breach Lawsuits In Light Of Ashley Madison, Arthur R. Vorbrodt 2016 Washington and Lee University School of Law

Clapper Dethroned: Imminent Injury And Standing For Data Breach Lawsuits In Light Of Ashley Madison, Arthur R. Vorbrodt

Washington and Lee Law Review Online

No abstract provided.


Compensation's Role In Deterrence, Russell M. Gold 2016 NYU School of Law

Compensation's Role In Deterrence, Russell M. Gold

New York University Public Law and Legal Theory Working Papers

There are plenty of non-economic reasons to care whether victims are compensated in class actions. The traditional law and economics view, however, is that when individual claim values are small, there is no reason to care whether victims are compensated. Deterring wrongdoing is tort law’s primary economic objective. And on this score, law and economics scholars contend that only the aggregate amount of money that a defendant expects to pay affects deterrence. They say that it does not matter for deterrence purposes how that money is split between victims, lawyers, and charities. This Article challenges that claim about achieving ...


Compensation's Role In Deterrence, Russell M. Gold 2016 NYU School of Law

Compensation's Role In Deterrence, Russell M. Gold

New York University Law and Economics Working Papers

There are plenty of non-economic reasons to care whether victims are compensated in class actions. The traditional law and economics view, however, is that when individual claim values are small, there is no reason to care whether victims are compensated. Deterring wrongdoing is tort law’s primary economic objective. And on this score, law and economics scholars contend that only the aggregate amount of money that a defendant expects to pay affects deterrence. They say that it does not matter for deterrence purposes how that money is split between victims, lawyers, and charities. This Article challenges that claim about achieving ...


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