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A Genealogy Of Programmatic Stop And Frisk: The Discourse-To-Practice-Circuit, Frank Rudy Cooper 2018 University of Nevada, Las Vegas Boyd School of Law

A Genealogy Of Programmatic Stop And Frisk: The Discourse-To-Practice-Circuit, Frank Rudy Cooper

University of Miami Law Review

President Trump has called for increased use of the recently predominant policing methodology known as programmatic stop and frisk. This Article contributes to the field by identifying, defining, and discussing five key components of the practice: (1) administratively dictated (2) pervasive Terry v. Ohio stops and frisks (3) aimed at crime prevention by means of (4) data-enhanced profiles of suspects that (5) target young racial minority men.

Whereas some scholars see programmatic stop and frisk as solely the product of individual police officer bias, this Article argues for understanding how we arrived at specific police practices by analyzing three levels ...


Criminal Doctrines Of Faith, David Jaros 2018 University of Baltimore School of Law

Criminal Doctrines Of Faith, David Jaros

Boston College Law Review

Decisions like Miranda v. Arizona helped popularize a conception of the courts as a protector of criminal defendants and a bulwark against overly aggressive law enforcement. But from arrest through trial, the U.S. Supreme Court has fashioned criminal constitutional procedure with a deep and abiding faith in the motivations of the criminal justice system’s actors. Even decisions that vindicate individual constitutional rights at the expense of police and prosecutorial power are shaped by the Court’s fundamental trust in those same actors. They establish, in essence, “Criminal Doctrines of Faith.” Criminal Doctrines of Faith pervade each stage of ...


Discriminatory Job Knowledge Tests, Police Promotions, And What Title Vii Can Learn From Tort Law, Mark S. Brodin 2018 Boston College Law School

Discriminatory Job Knowledge Tests, Police Promotions, And What Title Vii Can Learn From Tort Law, Mark S. Brodin

Boston College Law Review

Nationally, the continued use of selection devices by police departments—such as multiple-choice examinations requiring memorization of police manuals—stifles advancement for a disproportionate number of otherwise qualified minority candidates, and hinders the desired diversification of the upper ranks. These exams have little to do with predicting success as a sergeant or other police supervisor. The traditional Title VII approach, a disparate impact challenge, has proven unsatisfactory given the relative ease with which the exams can be “content validated” in court. This Article proposes a new approach familiar to tort lawyers—the inference of intent from actions taken with foreseeable ...


Cracking Down On Cages: Feminist And Prison Abolitionist Considerations For Litigating Solitary Confinement In Canada, Winnie Phillips-Osei 2018 Western University

Cracking Down On Cages: Feminist And Prison Abolitionist Considerations For Litigating Solitary Confinement In Canada, Winnie Phillips-Osei

Master of Laws Research Papers Repository

Guided by prison abolition ethic and intersectional feminism, my key argument is that Charter section 15 is the ideal means of eradicating solitary confinement and its adverse impact on women who are Aboriginal, racialized, mentally ill, or immigration detainees. I utilize a provincial superior court’s failing in exploring a discrimination analysis concerning Aboriginal women, to illustrate my key argument. However, because of the piecemeal fashion in which courts can effect developments in the law, the abolition of solitary confinement may very well occur through a series of ‘little wins’. In Chapter 11, I provide a constitutional analysis, arguing that ...


The Accidental Crit Iii: The Unbearable Lightness Of Being ... Pedro?, Pedro A. Malavet 2018 University of Florida Levin College of Law

The Accidental Crit Iii: The Unbearable Lightness Of Being ... Pedro?, Pedro A. Malavet

Pedro A. Malavet

This is a new draft of this article. I have updated the text with the latest developments in a number of areas related to current events. I have also added a substantial number of footnotes to explain some concepts that are common to Critical Race Theory, but that may not be as generally known to those who write in other areas.

The article is a narrative about my process of coming to terms with the promotion and tenure process that I endured through a type of scholarly catharsis; in this essay I review my continued presence in the legal academy ...


#Sowhitemale: Federal Civil Rulemaking, Brooke D. Coleman 2018 Seattle University School of Law

#Sowhitemale: Federal Civil Rulemaking, Brooke D. Coleman

NULR Online

116 out of 136. That is the number of white men who have served on the eighty-two-year-old committee responsible for creating and maintaining the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure. The tiny number of non-white, non-male committee members is disproportionate, even in the context of the white-male-dominated legal profession. If the rules were simply a technical set of instructions made by a neutral set of experts, then perhaps these numbers might not be as disturbing. But that is not the case. The Civil Rules embody normative judgments about the values that have primacy in our civil justice system, and the rule-makers ...


#Sowhitemale: Federal Civil Rulemaking, Brooke D. Coleman 2018 Northwestern Pritzker School of Law

#Sowhitemale: Federal Civil Rulemaking, Brooke D. Coleman

Northwestern University Law Review

116 out of 136. That is the number of white men who have served on the eighty-two-year-old committee responsible for creating and maintaining the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure. The tiny number of non-white, non-male committee members is disproportionate, even in the context of the white-male-dominated legal profession. If the rules were simply a technical set of instructions made by a neutral set of experts, then perhaps these numbers might not be as disturbing. But that is not the case. The Civil Rules embody normative judgments about the values that have primacy in our civil justice system, and the rule-makers ...


Visibly (Un)Just: The Optics Of Grand Jury Secrecy And Police Violence, Nicole Smith Futrell 2018 Penn State Dickinson Law

Visibly (Un)Just: The Optics Of Grand Jury Secrecy And Police Violence, Nicole Smith Futrell

Dickinson Law Review

Police violence has become more visible to the public through racial justice activism and social justice advocates’ use of technology. Yet, the heightened visibility of policing has had limited impact on transparency and accountability in the legal process, particularly when a grand jury is empaneled to determine whether to issue an indictment in a case of police violence. When a grand jury decides not to indict, the requirement of grand jury secrecy prevents public disclosure of the testimony, witnesses, and evidence presented to the grand jury. Grand jury secrecy leaves those who have seen and experienced the act of police ...


Principles And Consequences In A Virtue Ethics Analysis Of Affirmative Action, Caleb H A Brown 2018 Liberty University

Principles And Consequences In A Virtue Ethics Analysis Of Affirmative Action, Caleb H A Brown

Montview Liberty University Journal of Undergraduate Research

In this paper, I evaluate affirmative action from the framework of virtue ethics. In doing so, I consider the principles behind affirmative action as well as its consequences because a perfectly virtuous person will act per just principles but will also be concerned with the consequences of her actions. An attempt to restore justice that utilizes a mechanism known to be ineffective is not truly an attempt to restore justice, and so is not virtuous. Therefore, if affirmative action is principally justified, a complete virtue ethical analysis will still ask, “Do we know if it works?” I conclude that affirmative ...


The Legacy Of Slavery, Cognitive Shortcuts, And Biased News: The Mass Media’S Vilification Of Black Males And The Resulting “Reasonableness” Of Excessive Force By Law Enforcement, Janyl Relling Smith 2018 University of Miami Law School

The Legacy Of Slavery, Cognitive Shortcuts, And Biased News: The Mass Media’S Vilification Of Black Males And The Resulting “Reasonableness” Of Excessive Force By Law Enforcement, Janyl Relling Smith

University of Miami Race & Social Justice Law Review

No abstract provided.


Front Matter And Table Of Contents, 2018 University of Miami Law School

Front Matter And Table Of Contents

University of Miami Race & Social Justice Law Review

No abstract provided.


A Monumental Undertaking – Tackling Vestiges Of The Confederacy In The Florida Landscape, Juanita Solis 2018 University of Miami Law School

A Monumental Undertaking – Tackling Vestiges Of The Confederacy In The Florida Landscape, Juanita Solis

University of Miami Race & Social Justice Law Review

Symbols of the Confederacy have been a volatile topic across the country as recent events have spurred new resistance to their display. Part I of this note provides a brief introduction into the current controversy surrounding Confederate monuments in the United States, with a particular emphasis on the erected memorials in the Florida landscape. Part II argues that Confederate monuments were mainly erected with the intention of advancing racial subordination during time periods in American history where black Americans resisted white supremacy. As shown by the events that followed right–wing violence in both South Carolina and Virginia, this note ...


Law School News: Diversity, Front And Center, Michael M. Bowden 2018 Roger Williams University School of Law

Law School News: Diversity, Front And Center, Michael M. Bowden

Life of the Law School (1993- )

No abstract provided.


Section 5'S Forgotten Years: Congressional Power To Enforce The Fourteenth Amendment Before Katzenbach V. Morgan, Christopher W. Schmidt 2018 Northwestern Pritzker School of Law

Section 5'S Forgotten Years: Congressional Power To Enforce The Fourteenth Amendment Before Katzenbach V. Morgan, Christopher W. Schmidt

Northwestern University Law Review

Few decisions in American constitutional law have frustrated, inspired, and puzzled more than Katzenbach v. Morgan. Justice Brennan’s 1966 opinion put forth the seemingly radical claim that Congress—through its power, based in Section 5 of the Fourteenth Amendment, to “enforce, by appropriate legislation,” the rights enumerated in that Amendment—shared responsibility with the Court to define the meaning of Fourteenth Amendment rights. Although it spawned a cottage industry of scholarship, this claim has never been fully embraced by a subsequent Supreme Court majority, and in City of Boerne v. Flores, the Supreme Court rejected the heart of the ...


Rwu Law News: The E-Newsletter Of Roger Williams University School Of Law September 2018, Roger Williams University School of Law 2018 Roger Williams University

Rwu Law News: The E-Newsletter Of Roger Williams University School Of Law September 2018, Roger Williams University School Of Law

Life of the Law School (1993- )

No abstract provided.


Digging Them Out Alive, Michael Millemann, Rebecca Bowman Rivas, Elizabeth Smith 2018 University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law

Digging Them Out Alive, Michael Millemann, Rebecca Bowman Rivas, Elizabeth Smith

Faculty Scholarship

From 2013-2018, we taught a collection of interrelated law and social work clinical courses, which we call “the Unger clinic.” This clinic was part of a major, multi-year criminal justice project, led by the Maryland Office of the Public Defender. The clinic and project responded to a need created by a 2012 Maryland Court of Appeals decision, Unger v. State. It, as later clarified, required that all Maryland prisoners who were convicted by juries before 1981—237 older, long-incarcerated prisoners—be given new trials. This was because prior to 1981 Maryland judges in criminal trials were required to instruct the ...


The Politics Of Wounds, Jonathan Nash 2018 The University of Western Ontario

The Politics Of Wounds, Jonathan Nash

Electronic Thesis and Dissertation Repository

What configuration of strategies and discourses enable the white male and settler body politic to render itself as simultaneously wounded and invulnerable? I contextualize this question by reading the discursive continuities between Euro-America’s War on Terror post-9/11 and Algeria’s War for Independence. By interrogating political-philosophical responses to September 11, 2001 beside American rhetoric of a wounded nation, I argue that white nationalism, as a mode of settler colonialism, appropriates the discourses of political wounding to imagine and legitimize a narrative of white hurt and white victimhood; in effect, reproducing and hardening the borders of the nation-state. Additionally ...


Intellectual Property, Income Inequality, And Societal Interconnectivity In The United States: Social Calculus And The Historical Distribution Of Wealth, Brenda Reddix-Smalls 2018 North Carolina Central University School of Law

Intellectual Property, Income Inequality, And Societal Interconnectivity In The United States: Social Calculus And The Historical Distribution Of Wealth, Brenda Reddix-Smalls

North Carolina Central University Science & Intellectual Property Law Review

Scant attention has been paid to the historical trajectory and effect of the United States’ intellectual property regimes—patenting, copyrighting, and trademarking—as devices which implement racialized property grants and further income and social inequality. This article focuses on just that and argues that the United States Constitution was designed as a property-based and economically-driven social compact which identifies intellectual property interests through a racialized lens. From this view, it is further argued that the Intellectual Property Clause, which itself was designed to incentivize invention and innovation, protected the racialized property interests of the governing elites of the newly established ...


The Legal Foundations Of White Supremacy, Erika Wilson 2018 University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The Legal Foundations Of White Supremacy, Erika Wilson

DePaul Journal for Social Justice

No abstract provided.


Guest Editors' Introduction To The Special Issue, Diversity In Aquatics, Angela K. Beale-Tawfeeq, Steven N. Waller Ph.D., Austin Anderson 2018 Rowan University

Guest Editors' Introduction To The Special Issue, Diversity In Aquatics, Angela K. Beale-Tawfeeq, Steven N. Waller Ph.D., Austin Anderson

International Journal of Aquatic Research and Education

This is the introductory editorial leading off the special issue, "Diversity in Aquatics."


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