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Jailbreak!: What Happens When Autonomous Vehicle Owners Hack Into Their Own Cars, Michael Sinanian 2017 University of Michigan Law School

Jailbreak!: What Happens When Autonomous Vehicle Owners Hack Into Their Own Cars, Michael Sinanian

Michigan Telecommunications and Technology Law Review

Autonomous and connected vehicles (ACVs) are a transformational force for humanity. It is highly likely that some owners of ACVs will circumvent their vehicle software to expose unauthorized functionality, known as “jailbreaking”. This would trigger copyright liability, the extent of which would be dependent upon the copyright system’s various rulemaking processes and common law interpretations. This note explores the world of software “jailbreaking”, with its roots in smartphone unlocking, and extrapolates that to ACVs. Some compelling (and at times dangerous) scenarios are contemplated, and recommendations are made for consumers, technologists, manufacturers, and policy makers.


A Comment On Privacy And Accountability In Black-Box Medicine, Carl E. Schneider 2017 University of Michigan Law School

A Comment On Privacy And Accountability In Black-Box Medicine, Carl E. Schneider

Michigan Telecommunications and Technology Law Review

Human institutions and activities cannot avoid failures. Anxiety about them often provokes governments to try to prevent those failures. When that anxiety is vivid and urgent, government may do so without carefully asking whether regulation’s costs justify their benefits. Privacy and Accountability in Black Box Medicine admirably labors to bring discipline and rationality to thinking about an important development — the rise of “black-box medicine” — before it causes injuries regulation should have prevented and before it is impaired by improvident regulation. That is, Privacy and Accountability weighs the costs against the benefits of various forms of regulation across the many ...


Trust: A Model For Disclosure In Patent Law, Ari Ezra Waldman 2017 New York Law School

Trust: A Model For Disclosure In Patent Law, Ari Ezra Waldman

Indiana Law Journal

How to draw the line between public and private is a foundational, first-principles question of privacy law, but the answer has implications for intellectual property, as well. This project is one in a series of papers about first-person disclosures of information in the privacy and intellectual property law contexts, and it defines the boundary between public and nonpublic information through the lens of social science —namely, principles of trust.

Patent law’s public use bar confronts the question of whether legal protection should extend to information previously disclosed to a small group of people. I present evidence that shows that ...


Debating Employee Non-Competes And Trade Secrets, Sharon K. Sandeen, Elizabeth A. Rowe 2017 University of Florida Levin College of Law

Debating Employee Non-Competes And Trade Secrets, Sharon K. Sandeen, Elizabeth A. Rowe

UF Law Faculty Publications

Recently, a cacophony of concerns have been raised about the propriety of noncompetition agreements (NCAs) entered into between employers and employees, fueled by media reports of agreements which attempt to restrain low-wage and low-skilled workers, such as sandwich makers and dog walkers. In the lead-up to the passage of the federal Defend Trade Secrets Act of 2016 (DTSA), public policy arguments in favor of employee mobility were strongly advocated by those representing the “California view” on the enforceability of NCAs, leading to a special provision of the DTSA which limits injunctive relief with respect to employee NCAs.

Through our lens ...


Defining Biometrics: Toward A Transnational Ethic Of Personal Information, Nicola Morrow 2017 Macalester College

Defining Biometrics: Toward A Transnational Ethic Of Personal Information, Nicola Morrow

International Studies Honors Projects

Innovations in biotechnology, computer science, and engineering throughout the late 20th and early 21st centuries dramatically expanded possible modes of data-based surveillance and personal identification. More specifically, new technologies facilitated enormous growth in the biometrics sector. The response to the explosion of biometric technologies was two-fold. While intelligence agencies, militaries, and multinational corporations embraced new opportunities to fortify and expand security measures, many individuals objected to what they perceived as serious threats to privacy and bodily autonomy. These reactions spurred both further technological innovation, and a simultaneous proliferation of hastily drafted policies, laws, and regulations governing the collection ...


Upholding Citizens’ Privacy In The Use Of Stingray Technology: Is New York Behind?, Samantha Hazen 2017 Elisabeth Haub School of Law at Pace University

Upholding Citizens’ Privacy In The Use Of Stingray Technology: Is New York Behind?, Samantha Hazen

Pace Law Review

This Comment will argue that New York should follow the federal agencies’ and states’ leads by imposing a warrant requirement supported by probable cause on local and state agencies that wish to use Stingray technology in their investigations. The first section will explore Stingray technology and how it works. The second section will frame the issue and describe New York’s current standard. The third section will discuss the judicial response to the issue and how New York courts seem to place the burden of upholding privacy on the citizen, instead of the government. The third section will also discuss ...


Affording Fundamental Rights, Julie E. Cohen 2017 Georgetown University Law Center

Affording Fundamental Rights, Julie E. Cohen

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

Mireille Hildebrandt’s Smart Technologies and the End(s) of Law (2015) raises questions for law that are best characterized as meta-institutional. This review essay considers the implications of Hildebrandt’s work for the conceptualization of fundamental rights. One consequence of the shift to a world in which smart digital technologies continually, immanently mediate and preempt our beliefs and choices is that legal discourses about fundamental rights are revealed to be incomplete along a dimension that we have simply failed to recognize. To remain effective in the digital age, rights discourse requires extension into the register of affordances.


Having An Affair May Shorten Your Life: The Ashley Madison Suicides, Sakinah N. Jones 2017 Georgia State University College of Law

Having An Affair May Shorten Your Life: The Ashley Madison Suicides, Sakinah N. Jones

Georgia State University Law Review

Ashley Madison is an online dating service originally designed for people in committed relationships who want to cheat on their partners. In 2015, the website claimed to be “100% discreet.” Ashley Madison’s FAQs promised that its users would never compromise their “safety, privacy or security” and would never have to reveal their identities unless they chose to.

Ashley Madison’s concept attracted over forty million ostensibly anonymous members to its site. In July 2015, a group calling itself The Impact Team (Impact) hacked into Ashley Madison’s parent company, Avid Life Media, Inc. (Avid Life), breaching its security walls ...


Keep Out! The Efficacy Of Trespass, Nuisance And Privacy Torts As Applied To Drones, Hillary B. Farber 2017 University of Massachusetts School of Law

Keep Out! The Efficacy Of Trespass, Nuisance And Privacy Torts As Applied To Drones, Hillary B. Farber

Georgia State University Law Review

A few years ago one might have seen a small object flying overhead without any idea what it could be. Today, it is fairly commonplace to see drones flying around our neighborhood skies. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) predicts there will be seven million drones populating our skies by 2020. In 2015 hobbyists, recreational users, and commercial businesses purchased unmanned aerial vehicles, commonly referred to as drones, in record-breaking numbers. Estimates reveal that over 4.3 million drones were sold worldwide in 2015. Trade industry experts predicted that more than 2.8 million drones would be sold in the U ...


Civil Liberty Or National Security: The Battle Over Iphone Encryption, Karen Lowell 2017 Georgia State University College of Law

Civil Liberty Or National Security: The Battle Over Iphone Encryption, Karen Lowell

Georgia State University Law Review

On June 5, 2013, Edward Snowden released what would be the first of many documents exposing the vast breadth of electronic surveillance the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and the National Security Agency (NSA) had been conducting on millions of United States citizens. Although the federal agencies had legal authority under the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) to collect metadata from companies such as Verizon, many Americans considered this data collection to be a massive invasion of privacy.

Equipped with the knowledge of sweeping domestic surveillance programs, citizens and technology firms fighting for strong privacy and security protection, have started ...


Doubts About Daubert: Psychiatric Anecdata As A Case Study, Christopher Slobogin 2017 Selected Works

Doubts About Daubert: Psychiatric Anecdata As A Case Study, Christopher Slobogin

Christopher Slobogin

No abstract provided.


Forcing Players To Walk The Plank: Why End User License Agreements Improperly Control Players’ Rights Regarding Microtransactions In Video Games, Chelsea King 2017 College of William & Mary Law School

Forcing Players To Walk The Plank: Why End User License Agreements Improperly Control Players’ Rights Regarding Microtransactions In Video Games, Chelsea King

William & Mary Law Review

No abstract provided.


Privacy By Design: Taking Ctrl Of Big Data, Eric Everson 2017 Herzing University

Privacy By Design: Taking Ctrl Of Big Data, Eric Everson

Cleveland State Law Review

The concept of Privacy by Design is rooted in systems engineering. Yet, it is the legal framework of global privacy that gives new color to this concept as applied to Big Data. Increasingly, the long arm of the law is reaching into Big Data, but it is not simply by matter of regulatory enforcement or civil legal developments that Privacy by Design (PbD) is being thrust into the spotlight once more.

Given that Big Data is considered miniscule in contrast to future data environments, PbD is simply the right thing to do. This paper aims to explore the origin of ...


It Depends: Recasting Internet Clickwrap, Browsewrap, "I Agree," And Click-Through Privacy Clauses As Waivers Of Adhesion, Charles E. MacLean 2017 Indiana Tech Law School

It Depends: Recasting Internet Clickwrap, Browsewrap, "I Agree," And Click-Through Privacy Clauses As Waivers Of Adhesion, Charles E. Maclean

Cleveland State Law Review

Digital giants, enabled by America’s courts, Congress, and the Federal Trade Commission, devise click-through, clickwrap, browsewrap, "I Agree" waivers, and other legal fictions that purport to evidence user "consent" to consumer privacy erosions. It is no longer enough to justify privacy invasions as technologically inevitable or as essential to the American economy. As forced consent is no consent at all, privacy policies must advance with the technology. This article discusses adhesion waivers, the potential for FTC corrective action, and a comparison to privacy policies of the European Union.


Social Data Discovery And Proportional Privacy, Agnieszka McPeak 2017 University of Toledo College of Law

Social Data Discovery And Proportional Privacy, Agnieszka Mcpeak

Cleveland State Law Review

Social media platforms aggregate large amounts of personal information as "social data" that can be easily downloaded as a complete archive. Litigants in civil cases increasingly seek out broad access to social data during the discovery process, often with few limits on the scope of such discovery. But unfettered access to social data implicates unique privacy concerns—concerns that should help define the proper scope of discovery.

The Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, as amended in 2015, already contain the tools for crafting meaningful limits on intrusive social data discovery. In particular, the proportionality test under Rule 26 weighs the ...


Bioprospecting Legislation In The United States: What We Are Doing, What We Are Not Doing, And What Should We Do Next, Emily J. Stolfer 2017 Cleveland-Marshall College of Law

Bioprospecting Legislation In The United States: What We Are Doing, What We Are Not Doing, And What Should We Do Next, Emily J. Stolfer

Cleveland State Law Review

Bioprospecting is a growing worldwide effort to protect knowledge and the environment. With its potential economic benefit and technological advancements, bioprospecting will continue to grow as the world advances. Other nations have begun to protect the information available and continue to develop legislation. However, the United States has been hesitant to ratify international treaties or implement its own legislation. This Note examines both domestic and international efforts to protect both indigenous people and the environment. It analyzes the legislation the United States currently has in place but also examines where the United States is lacking. Regarding the United States’ failure ...


Game Of Phones: The Fourth Amendment Implications Of Real-Time Cell Phone Tracking, Cal Cumpstone 2017 Cleveland-Marshall College of Law

Game Of Phones: The Fourth Amendment Implications Of Real-Time Cell Phone Tracking, Cal Cumpstone

Cleveland State Law Review

With the help of technological advancements, law enforcement can now hijack a targeted individual’s cell phone to ping and track the phone’s exact location in real time. Based upon previous rulings, this new tracking process has apparently fallen into a "grey area" of Fourth Amendment jurisprudence. However, real-time cell phone tracking should be a search in terms of the Fourth Amendment and, therefore, require a warrant. Real-time cell phone tracking infringes on an individual’s reasonable expectation of privacy, violates the trespass doctrine as a trespass to chattels, and violates the Kyllo standard by using technology not in ...


Open-Source Licensing And Business Models: Making Money By Giving It Away, Andrew J. Hall 2017 Santa Clara Law

Open-Source Licensing And Business Models: Making Money By Giving It Away, Andrew J. Hall

Santa Clara High Technology Law Journal

Open-Source Licensing and Business Models: Making Money by Giving it Away


Self-Driving Cars: Autonomous Technology That Needs A Designated Duty Passenger, Michelle L.D. Hanlon 2017 Barry University School of Law

Self-Driving Cars: Autonomous Technology That Needs A Designated Duty Passenger, Michelle L.D. Hanlon

Barry Law Review

No abstract provided.


The New Foundations Of Open Source, Heather Meeker, Stephanie Petit 2017 Santa Clara Law

The New Foundations Of Open Source, Heather Meeker, Stephanie Petit

Santa Clara High Technology Law Journal

The New Foundations of Open Source


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