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Hearsay And The Confrontation Clause (2017), Lynn McLain 2017 University of Baltimore School of Law

Hearsay And The Confrontation Clause (2017), Lynn Mclain

All Faculty Scholarship

This material is a part of a lecture delivered at the Maryland Judicial Center on May 11, 2017. It is an update of previous versions available at the following locations:

2016: http://scholarworks.law.ubalt.edu/all_fac/955/

2012: http://scholarworks.law.ubalt.edu/all_fac/924/

The material is a series of flowcharts that explain the nuances of hearsay law and the confrontation clause under Maryland law.


How A Bill Becomes A Law In Maine: Governor Lepage, The State Legislature, And The 2015 Opinion Of The Justices On The Veto Question, Connor P. Schratz 2017 University of Maine School of Law

How A Bill Becomes A Law In Maine: Governor Lepage, The State Legislature, And The 2015 Opinion Of The Justices On The Veto Question, Connor P. Schratz

Maine Law Review

The battle between Governor Paul LePage and the Maine legislature in the summer of 2015 was one of the most contentious – and strangest – in state history. Hanging in the balance were over sixty pieces of legislation that the Governor insisted had been vetoed, and which senators and representatives of both parties claimed had become law. To resolve the issue, the Governor turned to the state Supreme Court, which unanimously decided in favor of the legislators in a nonbinding “Opinion of the Justices.” This case note explores that opinion, and comes to the conclusion that while the Court arrived at the ...


A Modern Look At The Right To A Civil Jury Trial Under The Maine Constitution, Carolyn A. Liegner 2017 University of Maine School of Law

A Modern Look At The Right To A Civil Jury Trial Under The Maine Constitution, Carolyn A. Liegner

Maine Law Review

The right to a civil jury trial is a cornerstone of the American legal system. The Maine Constitution promises an even broader right to a civil jury trial than is offered by the federal Constitution and many other states. Article I, Section 20 states: “In all civil suits, and in all controversies concerning property, the parties shall have a right to a trial by jury, except in cases where it has heretofore been otherwise practiced.” The exception in the provision has been the subject of multiple interpretations by the Maine Supreme Judicial Court, sitting as the Law Court, since the ...


Retributive Medication: A Discussion Of A Maine Law Allowing Involuntary, Forcible Medication Of A Pretrial Defendant For The Purpose Of Rendering The Defendant Competent To Stand Trial, Ashley T. Perry 2017 University of Maine School of Law

Retributive Medication: A Discussion Of A Maine Law Allowing Involuntary, Forcible Medication Of A Pretrial Defendant For The Purpose Of Rendering The Defendant Competent To Stand Trial, Ashley T. Perry

Maine Law Review

Innocent until proven guilty—it’s a phrase we have all heard, know, and accept. But there are circumstances where this simple concept is strained in its application, such as when a legally incompetent defendant is facing trial. After all, how can a defendant be proven guilty if he cannot stand trial? The Supreme Court of the United States has determined that forcibly medicating an incompetent defendant solely to render the defendant competent to stand trial is permissible under the Federal Constitution. However, the Federal Constitution provides only the floor-level of civil rights; states are free to set their own ...


The New Phoenix: Maine's Innovative Standards For Guardians Ad Litem, Dana E. Prescott 2017 University of Maine School of Law

The New Phoenix: Maine's Innovative Standards For Guardians Ad Litem, Dana E. Prescott

Maine Law Review

In a 2014 article in the Maine Law Review, the author reviewed the historical and legal foundations for guardian ad litem (GAL) appointments by judges on behalf of children in Maine. GALs are appointed to provide the court with investigative facts and recommendations concerning the best interest of a child. The implications and frustrations expressed during political and policy discussions reflect a broader national debate deeply rooted in the power of family law courts when child custody or abuse and neglect are alleged. Whether in the form of child protection or child custody litigation, the sheer volume and complexity of ...


Hawkes Co. V. United States Army Corps Of Engineers, Sarah M. Danno 2017 University of Montana School of Law

Hawkes Co. V. United States Army Corps Of Engineers, Sarah M. Danno

Public Land and Resources Law Review

A peat mining company will not be required to obtain a permit under the Clean Water Act to discharge dredged and fill material into wetlands. The United States District Court for the District of Minnesota held that the United States Army Corps of Engineers fell short in its attempts to establish jurisdiction over the wetlands by twice failing to show a significant nexus existed between the wetlands and navigable waters. Further, the district court enjoined the Corps from asserting jurisdiction a third time because it would force the mining company through a “never ending loop” of administrative law.


Modernizing Illinois State Government: Transcript Of Press Conference Announcing Creation Of A Central Panel And Copy Of Executive Order, Bruce Rauner 2017 Pepperdine University

Modernizing Illinois State Government: Transcript Of Press Conference Announcing Creation Of A Central Panel And Copy Of Executive Order, Bruce Rauner

Journal of the National Association of Administrative Law Judiciary

No abstract provided.


Sturgeon V. Frost: A Limited Holding Reveals An Environmentally Hesitant Post-Scalia Court, Michael O'Loughlin 2017 Boston College Law School

Sturgeon V. Frost: A Limited Holding Reveals An Environmentally Hesitant Post-Scalia Court, Michael O'Loughlin

Boston College Environmental Affairs Law Review

The first environmental case before the United States Supreme Court after the death of Justice Antonin Scalia, Sturgeon v. Frost, involved the National Park Service’s authority to regulate hovercraft use over a segment of river running through lands under its authority pursuant to the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act. The plaintiff sought to show that the State held title to navigable waters within the State, and that, therefore, the National Park Service did not have authority to enforce its regulation. The parties invoked precedent and argued for textual analysis of the at-issue statute, but the United States Court ...


Inverse Condemnation And Fracking Disasters: Government Liability For The Environmental Consequences Of Hydraulic Fracturing Under A Constitutional Takings Theory, Joseph Belza 2017 Boston College Law School

Inverse Condemnation And Fracking Disasters: Government Liability For The Environmental Consequences Of Hydraulic Fracturing Under A Constitutional Takings Theory, Joseph Belza

Boston College Environmental Affairs Law Review

The practice of hydraulic fracturing, more commonly known as fracking, risks a number of dangerous environmental consequences. Notably, fracking operations can contaminate the underlying water table. Contamination of groundwater can disrupt the access of a nearby property to both potable drinking water and viable commercial irrigation. Usually, when a fracking operation results in this kind of groundwater contamination, affected plaintiffs sue the operator of the rig. This Note proposes that similarly situated plaintiffs also name a new defendant in these actions: the state agency that granted the fracking permit. The governmental actor could bear liability under a constitutional theory of ...


The House Advantage: How The Professional And Amateur Sports Protection Act Undermines Concepts Of Federalism, And Severely Impacts New Jersey's Gambling-Feuled Economy, Anthony D'Alessandro 2017 Seton Hall University School of Law

The House Advantage: How The Professional And Amateur Sports Protection Act Undermines Concepts Of Federalism, And Severely Impacts New Jersey's Gambling-Feuled Economy, Anthony D'Alessandro

Seton Hall Circuit Review

No abstract provided.


Failing Cities And The Red Queen Phenomenon, Samir D. Parikh, Zhaochen He 2017 Lewis & Clark Law School

Failing Cities And The Red Queen Phenomenon, Samir D. Parikh, Zhaochen He

Boston College Law Review

Cities and counties are failing. Unfunded liabilities for retirees’ healthcare benefits aggregate to more than $1 trillion. Pension systems are underfunded by as much as $4.4 trillion. Many local government capital structures ensure rising costs and declining revenues, the precursors to service-delivery insolvency. These governments are experiencing the Red Queen phenomenon. They have tried a dizzying number of remedies, but their dire situation persists unchanged. State legislatures have failed to respond. More specifically, many states have refused to implement meaningful debt restructuring mechanisms for local governments. They argue that giving cities and counties the power to potentially impair bond ...


Priority Of Condominium Associations’ Assessment Liens Vis–À–Vis Mortgages: Navigating In The Super-Priority Lien Jurisdictions, Aušra Gaigalaitė 2017 Seattle University School of Law

Priority Of Condominium Associations’ Assessment Liens Vis–À–Vis Mortgages: Navigating In The Super-Priority Lien Jurisdictions, Aušra Gaigalaitė

Seattle University Law Review

This Note will discuss the issues concerning laws regulating lien priority in association foreclosure sales and argue that lenders, because they are in the best position to do so, should implement proactive strategies to protect their interests in association foreclosures. Part I provides an overview of uniform law development and a history of Washington’s governing laws with a focus on recent problems relating to association lien priority. Part II presents analysis of the important court decisions applying the lien priority statute and discussion regarding current and proposed Washington law. Finally, Part III discusses potential solutions lenders should implement to ...


The Home-Field Disadvantage: Tort Liability And Immunity For Paid Physicians During Disasters Within The Pacific Northwest Emergency Management Arrangement Member States, Stephen Seely 2017 Seattle University School of Law

The Home-Field Disadvantage: Tort Liability And Immunity For Paid Physicians During Disasters Within The Pacific Northwest Emergency Management Arrangement Member States, Stephen Seely

Seattle University Law Review

This Note identifies how the Pacific Northwest Emergency Management Arrangement member states of Alaska, Idaho, Oregon, and Washington apply tort liability and immunity to medical professionals during times of disaster. This Note also identifies an example statutory scheme that, if enacted, will provide equal protection to all physicians who provide care to disaster victims, regardless of their local or out-of-state status.


Perspectives - Jonathan Denham And Paul Wolf Of Denham Wolf Real Estate Services, James Hagy, Kelly Padden 2017 New York Law School

Perspectives - Jonathan Denham And Paul Wolf Of Denham Wolf Real Estate Services, James Hagy, Kelly Padden

Rooftops Project

In a conversation with Kelly Padden and Professor James Hagy of The Rooftops Project, Jon Denham and Paul Wolf reflect on their experiences with not-for-profit projects across mission types to draw lessons about creativity in locating and securing permanent space in one of the world’s most expensive real estate markets.


Perspectives - David Samuels And Themes Karalis Of Duval & Stachenfeld Llp, James Hagy, Jordan Moss 2017 New York Law School

Perspectives - David Samuels And Themes Karalis Of Duval & Stachenfeld Llp, James Hagy, Jordan Moss

Rooftops Project

Federal and state law can impose compliance requirements affecting both disposing of and transacting in real estate by not-for-profit organizations. In a dialogue with The Rooftop Project’s Jordan Moss and Professor James Hagy, David Samuels and Themes Karalis of the law firm Duval & Stachenfeld illustrate situations, including some unique to New York law and regulation, in which compliance and care are warranted.


Profiles - Rosie's Theater Kids, James Hagy, Frank Loffreno 2017 New York Law School

Profiles - Rosie's Theater Kids, James Hagy, Frank Loffreno

Rooftops Project

What started out as a single dance and song class in a borrowed New York City public school lunchroom has evolved into programming that touches the lives of students across all five New York City boroughs in a dedicated building near the heart of the Broadway theater district. The Rooftops Project’s Frank Loffreno and Professor James Hagy visit with Rosie’s Theater Kids cofounder and Artistic and Executive Director Lori Klinger and Director of Advancement Lindsay Miserandino at the Maravel Arts Center in New York’s Midtown West neighborhood.


Profiles - The Sammons Center, James Hagy, Brenda Alejo 2017 New York Law School

Profiles - The Sammons Center, James Hagy, Brenda Alejo

Rooftops Project

A historic but disused water pumping station, sited between active freeways, became an early and enduringly successful innovator in mission-centered notfor- profit supportive space for the arts. Brenda Alejo and Professor James Hagy of The Rooftops Project talk with Joanna St. Angelo, Executive Director of the Sammons Center for the Arts in Dallas, Texas.


Perspectives - Bms Building Management Systems, James Hagy, Frank Loffreno 2017 New York Law School

Perspectives - Bms Building Management Systems, James Hagy, Frank Loffreno

Rooftops Project

How can not-for-profit organizations better prepare themselves to launch and sustain effective relationships with their outside janitorial, security, and maintenance service providers? Mike Doherty, President and CEO of BMS Building Management Services, and members of his New York City team consider these themes with Frank Loffreno and Professor James Hagy of The Rooftops Project.


Perspectives - 120 Wall Street, James Hagy, Allison Snyder 2017 New York Law School

Perspectives - 120 Wall Street, James Hagy, Allison Snyder

Rooftops Project

Through a decades-long collaboration with the city and state, not-for-profit tenants occupy office space in a landmarked structure in the heart of Wall Street with the unusual advantage of no real estate taxes. The Rooftop Project’s Alison Snyder and Professor James Hagy interview Jeremy Moss and Camille McGratty of Silverstein Properties at the iconic 120 Wall Street building in lower Manhattan.


Profiles - Barrier Free Living, James Hagy, Christopher Whalen 2017 New York Law School

Profiles - Barrier Free Living, James Hagy, Christopher Whalen

Rooftops Project

What if you were homeless, a victim of domestic violence, and perhaps were also struggling with physical or mental disabilities? Where would you go? Christopher Whalen and Professor James Hagy of The Rooftops Project visit with Paul Feuerstein, founder, President, and CEO of Barrier Free Living, which has served these needs in New York City through a unique program established almost 40 years ago.


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