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Rape On The Washington Southern: The Tragic Case Of Hines V. Garrett, Michael I. Krauss 2017 The Catholic University of America, Columbus School of Law

Rape On The Washington Southern: The Tragic Case Of Hines V. Garrett, Michael I. Krauss

Catholic University Law Review

In 1919, Ms. Julia May Garret, a young Virginian woman, was brutally raped by two different men as she was walking home after the Washington Southern Railway failed to stop at her designated station. What followed was a legal battle that created precedent still discussed in American casebooks today. Although most case law recognizes that the criminal acts of third parties severs liability because such conduct is considered unforeseeable, Hines v. Garrett held that the harm Ms. Garrett suffered was within the risk created by the railroad’s negligence, and as a common carrier, the railroad owed her a duty ...


Supreme Court Of The Roman Empire.Docx, C.G. Bateman 2017 University of British Columbia, Peter A. Allard School of Law

Supreme Court Of The Roman Empire.Docx, C.G. Bateman

C.G. Bateman


 


The Indigenous As Alien, Leti Volpp 2017 UC Berkeley Law

The Indigenous As Alien, Leti Volpp

Leti Volpp

No abstract provided.


Trigger Crimes & Social Progress: The Tragedy-Outrage-Reform Dynamic In America, Paul H. Robinson, Sarah M. Robinson 2017 University of Pennsylvania Law School

Trigger Crimes & Social Progress: The Tragedy-Outrage-Reform Dynamic In America, Paul H. Robinson, Sarah M. Robinson

Faculty Scholarship

Can a crime make our world better? Crimes are the worst of humanity’s wrongs but, oddly, they sometimes do more than anything else to improve our lives. It is often the outrageousness itself that does the work. Ordinary crimes are accepted as the background noise of everyday existence but some crimes make people stop and take notice – because they are so outrageous or so heart-wrenching.

This brief essay explores the dynamic of tragedy, outrage, and reform, illustrating how certain kinds of crimes can trigger real social progress. Several dozen such “trigger crimes” are identified but four in particular are ...


The Separation Of Corporate Law And Social Welfare, William W. Bratton 2017 University of Pennsylvania Law School

The Separation Of Corporate Law And Social Welfare, William W. Bratton

Faculty Scholarship

A half century ago, corporate legal theory pursued an institutional vision in which corporations and the law that creates them protect people from the ravages of volatile free markets. That vision was challenged on the ground during the 1980s, when corporate legal institutions and market forces came to blows over questions concerning hostile takeovers. By 1990, it seemed like the institutions had won. But a different picture has emerged as the years have gone by. It is now clear that the market side really won the battle of the 1980s, succeeding in entering a wedge between corporate law and social ...


Assessing The State Of The State Constitutionalism, Jim Rossi 2017 Florida State University College of Law

Assessing The State Of The State Constitutionalism, Jim Rossi

Jim Rossi

Robert Williams's The Law of American State Constitutions is an impressive career accomplishment for one of the leading academic lawyers writing on state constitutions. Given the need for a comprehensive, treatise-like treatment of state constitutions that transcends individual jurisdictions, Williams's book will almost certainly become the go-to treatise for the next generation of state constitutional law practitioners and scholars. The U.S. Constitution has a grip on how the American legal mind approaches issues in American constitutionalism, but an important recurring theme in Williams's work (as well as that of others) is how state constitutions present unique ...


The Empty Idea Of “Equality Of Creditors”, David A. Skeel Jr. 2017 University of Pennsylvania Law School

The Empty Idea Of “Equality Of Creditors”, David A. Skeel Jr.

Faculty Scholarship

For two hundred years, the equality of creditors norm—the idea that similarly situated creditors should be treated similarly—has been widely viewed as the most important principle in American bankruptcy law, rivaled only by our commitment to a fresh start for honest but unfortunate debtors. I argue in this Article that the accolades are misplaced. Although the equality norm once was a rough proxy for legitimate concerns, such as curbing self-dealing, it no longer plays this role. Nor does it serve any other beneficial purpose.

Part I of this Article traces the historical emergence and evolution of the equality ...


Rediscovering Senator Edmund Muskie, The Honorable Kermit V. Lipez 2017 University of Maine School of Law

Rediscovering Senator Edmund Muskie, The Honorable Kermit V. Lipez

Maine Law Review

I wish to begin my remarks by congratulating the Maine Law Review for sponsoring this important symposium on the legislative achievements of Senator Muskie. It is a well-deserved tribute during this 100th anniversary year of his birth. I also want to thank the Law Review for inviting me to give the opening remarks for the Symposium. It is a privilege to do so, and to speak in the presence of former Secretary of State Madeline Albright. We are all honored by her presence. I must acknowledge, however, that it is a daunting task to present these remarks in the presence ...


The Law (?) Of The Lincoln Assassination, Martin S. Lederman 2017 Georgetown University Law Center

The Law (?) Of The Lincoln Assassination, Martin S. Lederman

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

Shortly after John Wilkes Booth killed Abraham Lincoln on April 14, 1865, President Andrew Johnson directed that Booth’s alleged coconspirators be tried in a makeshift military tribunal, rather than in the Article III court that was open for business just a few blocks from Ford’s Theater. Johnson’s decision implicated a fundamental constitutional question that was a subject of heated debate throughout the Civil War: When, if ever, may the federal government circumvent Article III’s requirements of a criminal trial by jury, with an independent, tenure-protected presiding judge, by trying individuals other than members of the armed ...


Robert Morris: Lawyer & Activist, Laurel Davis 2017 Boston College Law School

Robert Morris: Lawyer & Activist, Laurel Davis

Rare Book Room Exhibition Programs

Exhibition program from a Spring 2017 exhibit presented in the Daniel R. Coquillette Rare Book Room at the Boston College Law Library. The exhibit explored the life and career of Robert Morris, the second African-American lawyer in the Unites States. Materials from the John J. Burns Library at Boston College and the Boston Athenaeum were featured.


Capitalism And Unfreedom: Louis D. Brandeis And A Liberty Of The Left, Eric L. Apar 2017 The Graduate Center, City University of New York

Capitalism And Unfreedom: Louis D. Brandeis And A Liberty Of The Left, Eric L. Apar

All Graduate Works by Year: Dissertations, Theses, and Capstone Projects

The American Right features a well-developed—and well-heeled—infrastructure for promoting a conception of freedom as inextricable from capitalism. The American Left, by contrast, has seemed content to cede the territory, abandoning the ground of freedom for the terrain of “equality,” “justice,” “fairness,” and “prosperity.” This paper is an effort to address this asymmetry in the public discourse over the meaning of freedom. Its principal objective is to capture the vision of freedom embodied in the political and economic thought of Louis D. Brandeis, one of the American Left’s ablest expositors of freedom.

In addition, the paper has three ...


The Role Of History And Culture In Developing Bankruptcy And Insolvency Systems: The Perils Of Legal Transplantation, Nathalie Martin 2017 Selected Works

The Role Of History And Culture In Developing Bankruptcy And Insolvency Systems: The Perils Of Legal Transplantation, Nathalie Martin

Nathalie Martin

In this Article, Professor Nathalie Martin examines societal attitudes toward debt and financial failure in the context of two global trends, the liberalization of bankruptcy and insolvency laws, and the increased availability of consumer credit around the world. The Article begins with a description of the history of the U.S. economy, its risk-oriented capitalist ethos, its consumer culture, and its resulting consumer and business bankruptcy laws. The Article next briefly addresses the personal bankruptcy systems of Continental Europe, noting that in some places, U.S.-style bankruptcy systems have been enacted but not necessarily accepted. Professor Martin then discusses ...


Law Of The Sea-Submerged Lands-A State Must Exercise Substantial, Continuous, And Recognized Authority To Establish A Body Of Water As A Historic Bay, Sarah Melissa Stebbins 2017 University of Georgia School of Law

Law Of The Sea-Submerged Lands-A State Must Exercise Substantial, Continuous, And Recognized Authority To Establish A Body Of Water As A Historic Bay, Sarah Melissa Stebbins

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


Proportional Fault In Maritime Collisions-Charting The New Course, Gustave R. Dubus III 2017 University of Georgia School of Law

Proportional Fault In Maritime Collisions-Charting The New Course, Gustave R. Dubus Iii

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


A “Second Magna Carta”: The English Habeas Corpus Act And The Statutory Origins Of The Habeas Privilege, Amanda L. Tyler 2017 University of California Berkeley Law School

A “Second Magna Carta”: The English Habeas Corpus Act And The Statutory Origins Of The Habeas Privilege, Amanda L. Tyler

Amanda L Tyler

In my own scholarship, Fallon and Meltzer’s work on habeas models prompted me to dig deeper into the historical backdrop that informed ratification of the Suspension Clause and think harder about the relevance of that history for questions of constitutional interpretation. This, in turn, has spurred work that has occupied me for many years since. In the spirit of engaging with my federal courts professor one more time, this Article tells the story of the statutory origins of the habeas privilege—what Blackstone called a “second magna carta”—and argues that any explication of the constitutional privilege and discussion ...


Poverty, The Great Unequalizer: Improving The Delivery System For Civil Legal Aid, Latonia Haney Keith 2017 The Catholic University of America, Columbus School of Law

Poverty, The Great Unequalizer: Improving The Delivery System For Civil Legal Aid, Latonia Haney Keith

Catholic University Law Review

When individuals in the United States face civil justice issues, they are not entitled to legal counsel and therefore must secure paid counsel, proceed pro se or qualify for free legal assistance. As a result of the economic downturn, the number of Americans who are unable to afford legal counsel is now at an all-time high. In response to this ever-widening justice gap, the public interest community has launched multiple initiatives to supplement the underfunded legal aid system. Though valiant, this article argues that this approach has unfortunately created a complex, fragmented and overlapping delivery system for legal aid. This ...


The Age Of Constitutions In The Americas, M C. Mirow 2017 Florida International University College of Law

The Age Of Constitutions In The Americas, M C. Mirow

M. C. Mirow

The late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries have been aptly called the “Age of Codifications.” The same period was also the Age of Constitutions. Although a great deal is known about the migration of prenational and transnational legal sources and ideas that led to national codes of civil and criminal law in Europe and the Americas, much less is known about similar processes on the constitutional level. Constitutional historians have been more parochial than their private law counterparts, most likely because of the relationship between constitutions and nations. In the light of independence, nations immediately needed constitutions to solidify gains and ...


Was Castro Behind The Jfk Assassination?, Donald E. Wilkes Jr. 2017 University of Georgia School of Law

Was Castro Behind The Jfk Assassination?, Donald E. Wilkes Jr.

Popular Media

A month after Fidel Castro’s death, on Dec. 19, 2016, the tabloid National Enquirer published an article tinglingly titled “Dying Castro Admitted Killing JFK!” The article’s sensationalistic subtitle proclaimed “Chilling New Evidence Blows Assassination Wide Open After 53 Years.” This article by Professor Wilkes debunks the assertions set forth in the Enquirer article.


The Disposition Of Human Remains And Organ Donation: Increasing Testamentary Freedom While Upholding The No Property Rule, Louise M. Mimnagh 2017 Osgoode Hall Law School

The Disposition Of Human Remains And Organ Donation: Increasing Testamentary Freedom While Upholding The No Property Rule, Louise M. Mimnagh

Western Journal of Legal Studies

In terms of real and personal property, Canadian law grants individuals substantial testamentary freedom in the disposition of their estate. However, in regards to human remains, Ontario has upheld the common law’s longstanding “No Property Rule,” which prevents testamentary freedom in regards to one’s bodily remains. In light of changing societal notions of property and value with respect to the human body, this article argues in favour of implementing greater testamentary freedom for individuals in regards to the disposition of their body, organs, tissue, and fluids. This article reviews alternative approaches to the testamentary disposition of human remains ...


Legal Aid And Legal Services: An Overview, The Honorable Howard Dana 2017 University of Maine School of Law

Legal Aid And Legal Services: An Overview, The Honorable Howard Dana

Maine Law Review

You have asked me to summarize in under ten minutes the entire history of civil legal aid and civil legal services to the poor since the beginning of recorded history. I hope in this undertaking not to slight the substantial contributions of many of this room. Legal aid to the poor for all but the last fifty years has been almost exclusively the responsibility of the private bar. Dating back to at least the fourteenth century it was understood that in exchange for the privilege of being a compensated advocate in court, a lawyer had the responsibility to devote some ...


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