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The Commander In Chief's Authority To Combat Climate Change, Mark P. Nevitt 2015 SelectedWorks

The Commander In Chief's Authority To Combat Climate Change, Mark P. Nevitt

Mark P Nevitt

Climate change is the world’s greatest environmental threat. It also is increasingly understood as a threat to domestic and international peace and security. In recognition of this threat, the President has taken the initiative to prepare for climate change’s impact – in some cases drawing sharp objections from Congress. While both the President and Congress have constitutional authorities to address the national security threat posed by climate change, the precise contours of their overlapping powers are not clear. As Commander in Chief, the President has the constitutional authority to repel sudden attacks and take care that the laws are ...


Comments On Public Lands: Title Transfer Proposals, Chuck Howe 2015 University of Colorado Law School

Comments On Public Lands: Title Transfer Proposals, Chuck Howe

Challenging Federal Ownership and Management: Public Lands and Public Benefits (October 11-13)

3 pages.


The Public Trust Doctrine, Private Water Allocation, And Mono Lake: The Historic Saga Of National Audubon Society V. Superior Ct., Erin Ryan 2015 Lewis & Clark Law School

The Public Trust Doctrine, Private Water Allocation, And Mono Lake: The Historic Saga Of National Audubon Society V. Superior Ct., Erin Ryan

Erin Ryan

This article tells the epic tale of the fall and rise of Mono Lake—the strange and beautiful Dead Sea of California—which fostered some of the most important environmental law developments of the last century, and which has become a platform for some of the most potentially important developments in the new century. It shares the backstory and legacy of the California Supreme Court’s famous decision in National Audubon Society v. Superior Court, 658 P.2d 709 (Cal. 1983), known more widely as “the Mono Lake case.” Inspired by innovative legal scholarship and advocacy, the decision spawned a ...


Agenda: Innovations In Managing Western Water: New Approaches For Balancing Environmental, Social, And Economic Outcomes, University of Colorado Boulder. Getches Wilkinson Center for Natural Resources, Energy, and the Environment 2015 University of Colorado Law School

Agenda: Innovations In Managing Western Water: New Approaches For Balancing Environmental, Social, And Economic Outcomes, University Of Colorado Boulder. Getches Wilkinson Center For Natural Resources, Energy, And The Environment

Innovations in Managing Western Water: New Approaches for Balancing Environmental, Social and Economic Outcomes (Martz Summer Conference, June 11-12)

Many aspects of western water allocation and management are the product of independent and uncoordinated actions, several occurring a century or more ago. However, in this modern era of water scarcity, it is increasingly acknowledged that more coordinated and deliberate decision-making is necessary for effectively balancing environmental, social, and economic objectives. In recent years, a variety of forums, processes, and tools have emerged to better manage the connections between regions, sectors, and publics linked by shared water systems. In this event, we explore the cutting edge efforts, the latest points of contention, and the opportunities for further progress.


Economic Implications Of European Transfrontier Pollution: National Prerogative And Attribution Of Responsibility, Fredrick C. Eisenstein 2015 University of Georgia School of Law

Economic Implications Of European Transfrontier Pollution: National Prerogative And Attribution Of Responsibility, Fredrick C. Eisenstein

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


Proposed Implementing Procedures For Restore Act Awards Under Nepa, Sara Mammarella 2015 Nova Southeastern University

Proposed Implementing Procedures For Restore Act Awards Under Nepa, Sara Mammarella

Sara Mammarella

On April 20, 2010, what has been described as “the worst oil spill in U.S. history,” the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill, occurred off the Louisiana coast, affecting a five-state area in the Gulf region (Florida, Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi, and Texas), dumping an estimated 4.9 billion barrels of oil into the Gulf of Mexico. In response, Congress enacted the federal RESTORE Act to set up a mechanism for compensating the victims of the oils spill and to Repair the environmental harm caused by the oil spill.

This article will examine the effectiveness of the regulatory scheme in place ...


Amending Wto Rules To Alleviate Constraints On Renewable Energy Subsidies, Rick A. Waltman 2015 University of San Diego

Amending Wto Rules To Alleviate Constraints On Renewable Energy Subsidies, Rick A. Waltman

Rick A. Waltman

The rate of renewable energy adoption will largely determine the success of climate change mitigation efforts. Subsidies for the renewable energy industry, currently far outweighed by fossil fuel subsidies, will be necessary to establish greater adoption of renewable energy technologies. Because WTO rules impose constraints on subsidies based on ideals of international market freedom above all else, potential for nations to develop their domestic renewable energy industries is severely limited. This article proposes some possible amendments to the GATT, the SCM Agreement, and the TRIMs Agreement that Members might consider in future trade negotiations.


Fracking And The Rural Poor: Negative Externalities, Failing Remedies, And Federal Legislation, Matthew Castelli 2015 Maurer School of Law: Indiana University

Fracking And The Rural Poor: Negative Externalities, Failing Remedies, And Federal Legislation, Matthew Castelli

Indiana Journal of Law and Social Equality

This Note examines the relationship between the rural poor and the negative externalities of hydraulic fracturing (“fracking”). It asserts that the rural poor are disproportionately burdened with fracking’s negative externalities and that comprehensive, national regulation is needed because current legal methods are insufficient to internalize these costs. The argument is made in four parts: describing fracking’s externalities; assessing their impact on the rural poor; analyzing current legal regimes; and proposing an equitable regulatory framework based on cooperative federalism.

Fracking produces three main categories of negative externalities: water, air, and land contamination. Water contamination can be caused by migration ...


Iceberg Harvesting: Suggesting A Federal Regulatory Regime For A New Freshwater Source, Cory J. Lewis 2015 Boston College Law School

Iceberg Harvesting: Suggesting A Federal Regulatory Regime For A New Freshwater Source, Cory J. Lewis

Boston College Environmental Affairs Law Review

The global freshwater shortage has already reached crisis levels. The World Health Organization and UNICEF estimate that there are over 700 million people in the world without access to clean drinking water. While this crisis continues to intensify, a massive, game changing source of freshwater is floating in the Arctic and Antarctic oceans, slowly melting away: icebergs. This Note analyzes the potential for harvesting icebergs as a freshwater source on a global scale. By focusing on and illustrating the legal status of icebergs on the high seas, this Note seeks to demonstrate why icebergs are res nullius—existing in a ...


Free Riders On The Firestorm: How Shifting The Costs Of Wildfire Management To Residents Of The Wildland-Urban Interface Will Benefit Our Public Forests, Benjamin Reilly 2015 Boston College Law School

Free Riders On The Firestorm: How Shifting The Costs Of Wildfire Management To Residents Of The Wildland-Urban Interface Will Benefit Our Public Forests, Benjamin Reilly

Boston College Environmental Affairs Law Review

Since the early 1900s, the federal land management agencies—the Forest Service in particular—have focused their wildfire management efforts on suppression. A century of wildfire suppression policy has created a buildup of natural fuels in the Nation’s forests that contribute to larger, more damaging fires today. This, coupled with the rapid development of the Wildland-Urban Interface, makes today’s wildfires a greater threat to human life and property. As a result, the federal government’s annual expenditures for wildfire management have ballooned in recent years. Relying on the billions of tax dollars spent each year to fight wildfire ...


Bringing Southern Bluefin Tuna Back From The Brink: Enhancing Understanding Of The Scientific Process In The Western And Central Pacific Fisheries Commission, Chris Wold, Emi Kondo, Erika Hamilton 2015 Lewis & Clark Law School

Bringing Southern Bluefin Tuna Back From The Brink: Enhancing Understanding Of The Scientific Process In The Western And Central Pacific Fisheries Commission, Chris Wold, Emi Kondo, Erika Hamilton

Boston College Environmental Affairs Law Review

The Commission of the Convention on the Conservation and Management of Highly Migratory Fish Stocks in the Western Pacific Ocean, or the WCPFC, manages fish stocks of significant financial and ecological value across a vast area of the Pacific Ocean. WCPFC members, however, have disagreed sharply over management measures for tuna, sharks, and other species. These disagreements have arisen due to ambiguous text in the Convention on the Conservation and Management of Highly Migratory Fish Stocks in the Western Pacific Ocean regarding the roles of the Convention’s subsidiary bodies and providers of scientific advice. Some members argue that only ...


Deep Seabed Mining: Alternative Schemes For Protecting Developing Countries From Adverse Impacts, David Hegwood 2015 University of Georgia School of Law

Deep Seabed Mining: Alternative Schemes For Protecting Developing Countries From Adverse Impacts, David Hegwood

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


Shell Gulf Of Mexico, Inc. V. Center For Biological Diversity, Nick VandenBos 2015 University of Montana School of Law

Shell Gulf Of Mexico, Inc. V. Center For Biological Diversity, Nick Vandenbos

Public Land and Resources Law Review

In an attempt to stave off what it saw as impending litigation, Shell Gulf of Mexico, Inc. filed suit under the Declaratory Judgment Act against a range of environmental groups opposed to Shell’s oil exploration in the Beaufort and Chukchi seas of Alaska’s Arctic Coast. Shell requested a declaratory judgment that its oil spill response plans, as approved by the Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement, did not violate the Administrative Procedures Act. Although noting the novelty of Shell’s argument, the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit concluded the district court had erred in ...


Trending @ Rwu Law: Dennis Esposito's Post: Marine Affairs: Esposito Takes The Helm, Dennis Esposito 2015 Roger Williams University School of Law

Trending @ Rwu Law: Dennis Esposito's Post: Marine Affairs: Esposito Takes The Helm, Dennis Esposito

Blogs

No abstract provided.


What "Potential Wilderness" Really Means, Catherine L. Rucker 2015 Golden Gate University School of Law

What "Potential Wilderness" Really Means, Catherine L. Rucker

Catherine L Rucker

In November 2012, the Secretary of the Department of Interior decided to remove a commercial oyster operation from Drake's Estero, located within the Point Reyes National Seashore on the Northern California coast. The oyster company had operated for several decades. The District Court denied the company's claim for an injunction, and the Ninth Circuit upheld the decision.

The main issue was whether the Secretary had the "agency discretion" to remove the oyster company from a designated potential wilderness area. And actually, in 1976, Congress granted the Secretary with the agency discretion with section 3 of the National Park ...


What About Whitman?: The Supreme Court’S Decision In Epa V. Homer To Authorize Cost Consideration In Environmental Regulation Contradicts Its Own Precedent, Devon Applegate 2015 Boston College Law School

What About Whitman?: The Supreme Court’S Decision In Epa V. Homer To Authorize Cost Consideration In Environmental Regulation Contradicts Its Own Precedent, Devon Applegate

Boston College Environmental Affairs Law Review

In 2011, in response to the ongoing problem of interstate air pollution, EPA promulgated the Transport Rule to restrict emissions in upwind states in order to achieve attainment of certain national ambient air quality standards in downwind states. State and local governments and industry and labor groups, unhappy with EPA’s process of determining which states would be regulated under the Transport Rule, challenged the rule on the grounds that EPA had exceeded its authority under the Clean Air Act. In 2014, in EPA v. EME Homer City Generation, L.P., the Supreme Court of the United States held that ...


Essentially Reasonable?: Why The Ninth Circuit’S Decision In Native Village Of Point Hope Strays From The Purpose Of Nepa, Timothy Wright 2015 Boston College Law School

Essentially Reasonable?: Why The Ninth Circuit’S Decision In Native Village Of Point Hope Strays From The Purpose Of Nepa, Timothy Wright

Boston College Environmental Affairs Law Review

In Native Village of Point Hope v. Jewell, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit found that the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management did not have to include information on animal populations in its environmental impact statement (“EIS”) at the lease-sale stage of the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act oil and gas development program. Federal agencies are required to complete an EIS before conducting a major federal action. This process ensures that decision-makers take a hard look at adverse environmental impacts. The Ninth Circuit concluded in Native Village of Point Hope that coverage of animal populations is ...


A “Green” Lining: Closing The Door On Environmental Litigants In Bellon Could Lead To More Successful Environmental Challenges In The Future, Brian Bieschke 2015 Boston College Law School

A “Green” Lining: Closing The Door On Environmental Litigants In Bellon Could Lead To More Successful Environmental Challenges In The Future, Brian Bieschke

Boston College Environmental Affairs Law Review

In Washington Environmental Council v. Bellon, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit addressed the issue of Article III standing with respect to environmental organizations filing suit under the Clean Air Act. The organizations alleged that Washington state agencies were required to regulate the greenhouse gas emissions of five oil refineries, and that the agencies’ failure to do so caused particularized injuries to plaintiffs’ health and recreational enjoyment because of the impacts of those greenhouse gas emissions on climate change. Applying a three-pronged test requiring plaintiffs to establish injury in fact, causality, and redressability, the court determined ...


Substantial Burden And The Reasonable Necessity Doctrine In Severance Deed Ownership: Whiteman V. Chesapeake Appalachia, Kathryn Scherpf 2015 Boston College Law School

Substantial Burden And The Reasonable Necessity Doctrine In Severance Deed Ownership: Whiteman V. Chesapeake Appalachia, Kathryn Scherpf

Boston College Environmental Affairs Law Review

Horizontal severance deeds separate property rights above and below the surface. Sub-surface rights have typically belonged to mineral estate owners, whereas surface rights above have typically belonged to farmers. In West Virginia, courts have traditionally applied a common law trespass doctrine known as reasonable necessity to account for times when these bifurcated rights clash. The reasonable necessity doctrine in West Virginia has evolved over time as state courts have made it more rigorous by requiring that, in exercising their rights, sub-surface mineral estate owners not substantially burden the surface. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit’s ...


Why The Third Circuit Pro-Cooperative Federalism Preemption Holding In Bell Should Ultimately Be Adopted By The Supreme Court, Matthew Renick 2015 Boston College Law School

Why The Third Circuit Pro-Cooperative Federalism Preemption Holding In Bell Should Ultimately Be Adopted By The Supreme Court, Matthew Renick

Boston College Environmental Affairs Law Review

In Bell v. Cheswick Generating Station, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit reversed a decision by the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Pennsylvania, holding that state common law tort actions were not preempted by the federal Clean Air Act (“CAA”). The Third Circuit found that the savings clause of the CAA was nearly identical to that of the Clean Water Act (“CWA”), which had already been found to not preempt state common law tort actions by the U.S. Supreme Court. This Comment argues that the Third Circuit correctly compared the savings ...


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