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Federal Clean Air Act Preemption Of Public Nuisance Claims: The Case For Supreme Court Resolution, Richard O. Faulk 2015 George Mason Univeristy School of Law

Federal Clean Air Act Preemption Of Public Nuisance Claims: The Case For Supreme Court Resolution, Richard O. Faulk

Richard Faulk

The current circuit-by-circuit and state-by-state approach to the question of preemption precludes any uniform standards for environmental compliance and enforcement, and also vitiates any reliable basis for capital investment, expanded operations, and workforce stability. Because Congress enacted the CAA to promote those goals—as well as jobs and a healthy economy—delaying review prolongs the uncertainty and intensifies the dilemma facing not only the courts, but also the regulated community.


Agenda: Innovations In Managing Western Water: New Approaches For Balancing Environmental, Social, And Economic Outcomes, University of Colorado Boulder. Getches Wilkinson Center for Natural Resources, Energy, and the Environment 2015 University of Colorado Law School

Agenda: Innovations In Managing Western Water: New Approaches For Balancing Environmental, Social, And Economic Outcomes, University Of Colorado Boulder. Getches Wilkinson Center For Natural Resources, Energy, And The Environment

Innovations in Managing Western Water: New Approaches for Balancing Environmental, Social and Economic Outcomes (Martz Summer Conference, June 11-12)

Many aspects of western water allocation and management are the product of independent and uncoordinated actions, several occurring a century or more ago. However, in this modern era of water scarcity, it is increasingly acknowledged that more coordinated and deliberate decision-making is necessary for effectively balancing environmental, social, and economic objectives. In recent years, a variety of forums, processes, and tools have emerged to better manage the connections between regions, sectors, and publics linked by shared water systems. In this event, we explore the cutting edge efforts, the latest points of contention, and the opportunities for further progress.


Trending @ Rwu Law: Dennis Esposito's Post: Marine Affairs: Esposito Takes The Helm, Dennis Esposito 2015 Roger Williams University School of Law

Trending @ Rwu Law: Dennis Esposito's Post: Marine Affairs: Esposito Takes The Helm, Dennis Esposito

Blogs

No abstract provided.


What About Whitman?: The Supreme Court’S Decision In Epa V. Homer To Authorize Cost Consideration In Environmental Regulation Contradicts Its Own Precedent, Devon Applegate 2015 Boston College Law School

What About Whitman?: The Supreme Court’S Decision In Epa V. Homer To Authorize Cost Consideration In Environmental Regulation Contradicts Its Own Precedent, Devon Applegate

Boston College Environmental Affairs Law Review

In 2011, in response to the ongoing problem of interstate air pollution, EPA promulgated the Transport Rule to restrict emissions in upwind states in order to achieve attainment of certain national ambient air quality standards in downwind states. State and local governments and industry and labor groups, unhappy with EPA’s process of determining which states would be regulated under the Transport Rule, challenged the rule on the grounds that EPA had exceeded its authority under the Clean Air Act. In 2014, in EPA v. EME Homer City Generation, L.P., the Supreme Court of the United States held that ...


Essentially Reasonable?: Why The Ninth Circuit’S Decision In Native Village Of Point Hope Strays From The Purpose Of Nepa, Timothy Wright 2015 Boston College Law School

Essentially Reasonable?: Why The Ninth Circuit’S Decision In Native Village Of Point Hope Strays From The Purpose Of Nepa, Timothy Wright

Boston College Environmental Affairs Law Review

In Native Village of Point Hope v. Jewell, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit found that the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management did not have to include information on animal populations in its environmental impact statement (“EIS”) at the lease-sale stage of the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act oil and gas development program. Federal agencies are required to complete an EIS before conducting a major federal action. This process ensures that decision-makers take a hard look at adverse environmental impacts. The Ninth Circuit concluded in Native Village of Point Hope that coverage of animal populations is ...


A “Green” Lining: Closing The Door On Environmental Litigants In Bellon Could Lead To More Successful Environmental Challenges In The Future, Brian Bieschke 2015 Boston College Law School

A “Green” Lining: Closing The Door On Environmental Litigants In Bellon Could Lead To More Successful Environmental Challenges In The Future, Brian Bieschke

Boston College Environmental Affairs Law Review

In Washington Environmental Council v. Bellon, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit addressed the issue of Article III standing with respect to environmental organizations filing suit under the Clean Air Act. The organizations alleged that Washington state agencies were required to regulate the greenhouse gas emissions of five oil refineries, and that the agencies’ failure to do so caused particularized injuries to plaintiffs’ health and recreational enjoyment because of the impacts of those greenhouse gas emissions on climate change. Applying a three-pronged test requiring plaintiffs to establish injury in fact, causality, and redressability, the court determined ...


Substantial Burden And The Reasonable Necessity Doctrine In Severance Deed Ownership: Whiteman V. Chesapeake Appalachia, Kathryn Scherpf 2015 Boston College Law School

Substantial Burden And The Reasonable Necessity Doctrine In Severance Deed Ownership: Whiteman V. Chesapeake Appalachia, Kathryn Scherpf

Boston College Environmental Affairs Law Review

Horizontal severance deeds separate property rights above and below the surface. Sub-surface rights have typically belonged to mineral estate owners, whereas surface rights above have typically belonged to farmers. In West Virginia, courts have traditionally applied a common law trespass doctrine known as reasonable necessity to account for times when these bifurcated rights clash. The reasonable necessity doctrine in West Virginia has evolved over time as state courts have made it more rigorous by requiring that, in exercising their rights, sub-surface mineral estate owners not substantially burden the surface. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit’s ...


Why The Third Circuit Pro-Cooperative Federalism Preemption Holding In Bell Should Ultimately Be Adopted By The Supreme Court, Matthew Renick 2015 Boston College Law School

Why The Third Circuit Pro-Cooperative Federalism Preemption Holding In Bell Should Ultimately Be Adopted By The Supreme Court, Matthew Renick

Boston College Environmental Affairs Law Review

In Bell v. Cheswick Generating Station, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit reversed a decision by the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Pennsylvania, holding that state common law tort actions were not preempted by the federal Clean Air Act (“CAA”). The Third Circuit found that the savings clause of the CAA was nearly identical to that of the Clean Water Act (“CWA”), which had already been found to not preempt state common law tort actions by the U.S. Supreme Court. This Comment argues that the Third Circuit correctly compared the savings ...


Positive Contribution: Why The Second Circuit’S Understanding Of Cercla § 113 Should Make Way For The Third Circuit’S Pro-Settlement Holding In Trinity Industries, Sarah M. Gordon 2015 Boston College Law School

Positive Contribution: Why The Second Circuit’S Understanding Of Cercla § 113 Should Make Way For The Third Circuit’S Pro-Settlement Holding In Trinity Industries, Sarah M. Gordon

Boston College Environmental Affairs Law Review

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit has interpreted section 113(f)(3)(B) of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Cleanup, and Liability Act, or CERCLA, to only allow a party to seek contribution for claims resolved under CERCLA itself, rather than claims resolved under a state statute. In Trinity Industries, Inc. v. Chicago Bridge & Iron Co., the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit broke from Second Circuit precedent by holding that section 113(f)(3)(B) does not require a settlement under CERCLA to permit a contribution action pursuant to CERCLA. This Comment argues ...


Dormant Commerce Clause Review: Why The Ninth Circuit Decision In Corey Strayed From Precedent And What The Supreme Court Could Have Done About It, Hwi Harold Lee 2015 Boston College Law School

Dormant Commerce Clause Review: Why The Ninth Circuit Decision In Corey Strayed From Precedent And What The Supreme Court Could Have Done About It, Hwi Harold Lee

Boston College Environmental Affairs Law Review

In 2007, the California state legislature enacted the Low-Carbon Fuel Standard, or LCFS, limiting carbon emissions from transport fuels throughout the fuels’ entire “lifecycle,” by assigning “carbon intensity” scores to each fuel product. These scores are calculated using a variety of measurements, including the amount of carbon emitted while producing the fuels and in transporting them to California. Out-of-state fuel suppliers challenged that the LCFS places an unconstitutional burden on interstate commerce because their products would inevitably have higher carbon intensity scores than their in-state counterparts, based merely on the distance traveled. The dispute reached the U.S. Court of ...


Budgetary Scapegoat: The U.S. Fish And Wildlife Service’S Inefficiency On Trial In Conservation Force V. Jewell, Andrew Bartholomew 2015 Boston College Law School

Budgetary Scapegoat: The U.S. Fish And Wildlife Service’S Inefficiency On Trial In Conservation Force V. Jewell, Andrew Bartholomew

Boston College Environmental Affairs Law Review

By the early 1980s, the population of the straight-horned markhor—a large, shaggy goat with impressive spiraling horns native to the mountains of Pakistan—had dipped so low that the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (“FWS”) classified it as endangered. But when a group of conservationists and hunters petitioned the FWS to have the animal reclassified from an endangered species to the lower protection level of threatened pursuant to the Endangered Species Act species protection regime, they were largely ignored. The group then sued the FWS in federal court to compel the Agency to perform its statutory duty. In Conservation ...


Land Use Planning—A Pragmatic Proposition: Regionally Planned Coastal Tdrs In Light Of Rising Seas, Dan DePasquale 2015 Western New England University School of Law

Land Use Planning—A Pragmatic Proposition: Regionally Planned Coastal Tdrs In Light Of Rising Seas, Dan Depasquale

Dan DePasquale

No abstract provided.


Can An Oil Pit Take A Bird?: Why The Migratory Bird Treaty Act Should Apply To Inadvertent Takings And Killings By Oil Pits, Monica B. Carusello 2015 Florida State University

Can An Oil Pit Take A Bird?: Why The Migratory Bird Treaty Act Should Apply To Inadvertent Takings And Killings By Oil Pits, Monica B. Carusello

Monica B Carusello

No abstract provided.


The International Legal Framework For Climate Engineering, Jesse Reynolds 2015 Department of European and International Law, Faculty of Law, Tilburg University

The International Legal Framework For Climate Engineering, Jesse Reynolds

Jesse Reynolds

Several of the key, recurring questions which loom over climate engineering concern how countries would interact when some of them undertake or approve actions which might impact other countries. This chapter describes some international law which is applicable to climate engineering, with a focus on international environmental law. It closes with a brief synthesis and some recommendations for future developments. First, though, it introduces international law, and suggests why climate engineering is such a challenge for international environmental law and its scholars.


The Elephant In The Room, Troy B. Albert 2015 Lewis & Clark Law School

The Elephant In The Room, Troy B. Albert

Troy B Albert

Every 15 minutes, a poacher kills an elephant for its ivory. If this rate continues, the African elephant could become extinct in 20 years. Although federal law has strictly regulated the ivory market for several decades, the United States remains one of the largest markets for illegal wildlife products in the world. Because there are little to no enforcement mechanisms or verification processes by which to definitively distinguish legal from illegal ivory after reaching domestic markets, illegal ivory is easily mixed in with legal stocks. New regulations have been promulgated but are they enough?


The Elephant In The Room, Troy B. Albert 2015 Lewis & Clark Law School

The Elephant In The Room, Troy B. Albert

Troy B Albert

Every 15 minutes, a poacher kills an elephant for its ivory. If this rate continues, the African elephant could become extinct in 20 years. Although federal law has strictly regulated the ivory market for several decades, the United States remains one of the largest markets for illegal wildlife products in the world. Because there are little to no enforcement mechanisms or verification processes by which to definitively distinguish legal from illegal ivory after reaching domestic markets, illegal ivory is easily mixed in with legal stocks. New regulations have been promulgated but are they enough?


The Commander In Chief's Authority To Combat Climate Change, Mark P. Nevitt 2015 SelectedWorks

The Commander In Chief's Authority To Combat Climate Change, Mark P. Nevitt

Mark P Nevitt

Climate change is the world’s greatest environmental threat. It also is increasingly understood as a threat to domestic and international peace and security. In recognition of this threat, the President has taken the initiative to prepare for climate change’s impact – in some cases drawing sharp objections from Congress. While both the President and Congress have constitutional authorities to address the national security threat posed by climate change, the precise contours of their overlapping powers are not clear. As Commander in Chief, the President has the constitutional authority to repel sudden attacks and take care that the laws are ...


International Liability And Primary Rules Of Obligation: An Application To Acid Rain In The United States And Canada, John B. Lyle 2015 University of Georgia School of Law

International Liability And Primary Rules Of Obligation: An Application To Acid Rain In The United States And Canada, John B. Lyle

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


From The Shoals Of Ras Kaboudia To The Shores Of Tripoli: The Tunisia/Libya Continental Shelf Boundary Delimitation, Donna R. Christie 2015 Florida State University

From The Shoals Of Ras Kaboudia To The Shores Of Tripoli: The Tunisia/Libya Continental Shelf Boundary Delimitation, Donna R. Christie

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


Conserving Habitat Before It Is Too Late, Jack G. Connors 2015 The University of Montana School of Law

Conserving Habitat Before It Is Too Late, Jack G. Connors

Public Land and Resources Law Review

No abstract provided.


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