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Preservation: What Is It Good For?, Yuval Simchi-Levi 2017 N.Y. County District Attorney's Office

Preservation: What Is It Good For?, Yuval Simchi-Levi

Pace Law Review

The Article proceeds as follows: in Part A, the preservation doctrine is defined. In Part B, the history of the preservation doctrine is described. In Part C, there is an explanation as to the purpose of preservation. In Part D, there is a description of the appellate process in New York. In Part E, the statutory rules of the New York Court of Appeals are described. In Part F, there is a description of how the rules of preservation have loosened in New York since 2009. In Part G, there is a statistical analysis of the consequences of loosening the ...


The Lost Due Process Doctrines, Paul J. Larkin Jr. 2017 The Catholic University of America, Columbus School of Law

The Lost Due Process Doctrines, Paul J. Larkin Jr.

Catholic University Law Review

Due process jurisprudence has long been dominated by discussion of its procedural requirements and substantive limitations. Through the lens of the Constitution’s Due Process Clause, however, the Supreme Court has also considered the geographic reach and substantive exercise of legal authority, the delegation of law making to private parties, the incorporation doctrine, and the issues of fundamental fairness. These doctrines have existed for some time, but the Supreme Court has never explained how they fit into its “procedural vs. substantive” dichotomy. This article examines these Lost Due Process Doctrines and poses the question of whether they should suffer the ...


The Crushing Of A Dream: Daca, Dapa And The Politics Of Immigration Law Under President Obama, Robert H. Wood 2017 Barry University School of Law

The Crushing Of A Dream: Daca, Dapa And The Politics Of Immigration Law Under President Obama, Robert H. Wood

Barry Law Review

No abstract provided.


Toward A Theory Of The Political Defense, Isidore Silver 2017 St. John's University School of Law

Toward A Theory Of The Political Defense, Isidore Silver

The Catholic Lawyer

No abstract provided.


When Is A Criminal Trial Not A Criminal Trial? - The Case Against Jury Trials In Juvenile Court, Ronald G. Russo 2017 St. John's University School of Law

When Is A Criminal Trial Not A Criminal Trial? - The Case Against Jury Trials In Juvenile Court, Ronald G. Russo

The Catholic Lawyer

No abstract provided.


Our Principled Constitution, Mitchell N. Berman 2017 University of Pennsylvania Law School

Our Principled Constitution, Mitchell N. Berman

Faculty Scholarship

Suppose that one of us contends, and the other denies, that transgender persons have constitutional rights to be treated in accord with their gender identity. It appears that we are disagreeing about “what the law is.” And, most probably, we disagree about what the law is on this matter because we disagree about what generally makes it the case that our constitutional law is this rather than that.

Constitutional theory should provide guidance. It should endeavor to explain what gives our constitutional rules the contents that they have, or what makes true constitutional propositions true. Call any such account a ...


The Shifting Tides Of Merger Litigation, Matthew D. Cain, Jill E. Fisch, Steven Davidoff Solomon, Randall S. Thomas 2017 U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission

The Shifting Tides Of Merger Litigation, Matthew D. Cain, Jill E. Fisch, Steven Davidoff Solomon, Randall S. Thomas

Faculty Scholarship

In 2015, Delaware made several important changes to its laws concerning merger litigation. These changes, which were made in response to a perception that levels of merger litigation were too high and that a substantial proportion of merger cases were not providing value, raised the bar, making it more difficult for plaintiffs to win a lawsuit challenging a merger and more difficult for plaintiffs’ counsel to collect a fee award.

We study what has happened in the courts in response to these changes. We find that the initial effect of the changes has been to decrease the volume of merger ...


Bail Reform: New Directions For Pretrial Detention And Release, Megan Stevenson, Sandra G. Mayson 2017 University of Pennsylvania

Bail Reform: New Directions For Pretrial Detention And Release, Megan Stevenson, Sandra G. Mayson

Faculty Scholarship

Our current pretrial system imposes high costs on both the people who are detained pretrial and the taxpayers who foot the bill. These costs have prompted a surge of bail reform around the country. Reformers seek to reduce pretrial detention rates, as well as racial and socioeconomic disparities in the pretrial system, while simultaneously improving appearance rates and reducing pretrial crime. The current state of pretrial practice suggests that there is ample room for improvement. Bail hearings are often cursory, with no defense counsel present. Money-bail practices lead to high rates of detention even among misdemeanor defendants and those who ...


High-Stakes Interpretation, Ryan D. Doerfler 2017 University of Pennsylvania Law School

High-Stakes Interpretation, Ryan D. Doerfler

Faculty Scholarship

Courts look at text differently in high-stakes cases. Statutory language that would otherwise be ‘unambiguous’ suddenly becomes ‘less than clear.’ This, in turn, frees up courts to sidestep constitutional conflicts, avoid dramatic policy changes, and, more generally, get around undesirable outcomes. The standard account of this behavior is that courts’ failure to recognize ‘clear’ or ‘unambiguous’ meanings in such cases is motivated or disingenuous, and, at best, justified on instrumentalist grounds.

This Article challenges that account. It argues instead that, as a purely epistemic matter, it is more difficult to ‘know’ what a text means—and, hence, more difficult to ...


Should Juries And The Death Penalty Mix?: A Prediction About The Supreme Court's Answer, Christopher Slobogin 2017 University of Florida School of Law

Should Juries And The Death Penalty Mix?: A Prediction About The Supreme Court's Answer, Christopher Slobogin

Christopher Slobogin

Symposium: The Capital Jury Project


Rethinking Criminal Contempt In The Bankruptcy Courts, John A. E. Pottow, Jason S. Levin 2017 University of Michigan Law School

Rethinking Criminal Contempt In The Bankruptcy Courts, John A. E. Pottow, Jason S. Levin

Law & Economics Working Papers

A surprising number of courts believe that bankruptcy judges lack authority to impose criminal contempt sanctions. We attempt to rectify this misunderstanding with a march through the historical treatment of contempt-like powers in bankruptcy, the painful statutory history of the 1978 Bankruptcy Code (including the exciting history of likely repealed 28 U.S.C. § 1481), and the various apposite rules of procedure. (Fans of the All Writs Act will delight in its inclusion.) But the principal service we offer to the bankruptcy community is dismantling the ubiquitous and persistent belief that there is some form of constitutional infirmity with "mere ...


But See Kohlheim: The Third Circuit Muddies The Water On The Compensability Of Employee Meal Periods Under The Fair Labor Standards Act In Babcock V. Butler County, John A. LeBlanc 2017 Boston College Law School

But See Kohlheim: The Third Circuit Muddies The Water On The Compensability Of Employee Meal Periods Under The Fair Labor Standards Act In Babcock V. Butler County, John A. Leblanc

Boston College Law Review

On November 24, 2015, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit, in Babcock v. Butler County, formally adopted the application of the predominant benefit test when determining if the Fair Labor Standards Act requires an hourly employee’s meal period to be compensated. In so doing, the court implicitly concluded that each circuit that previously addressed the issue adopted the predominant benefit test. This Comment argues that the Third Circuit mischaracterized the status of the law on which test the circuit courts apply by overlooking the Eleventh Circuit’s application of the relieved from all duties test.


The Constitutionality Of The Immigration And Nationality Act Called Into Question Again: The Ninth Circuit Correctly Holds "Obstruction Of Justice" Raises Grave Constitutional Concerns In Valenzuela Gallardo V. Lynch, Taylor Gibson 2017 Boston College Law School

The Constitutionality Of The Immigration And Nationality Act Called Into Question Again: The Ninth Circuit Correctly Holds "Obstruction Of Justice" Raises Grave Constitutional Concerns In Valenzuela Gallardo V. Lynch, Taylor Gibson

Boston College Law Review

On March 31, 2016, in Valenzuela Gallardo v. Lynch, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit found that the phrase “an offense relating to obstruction of justice,” used as one definition of an aggravated felony within the Immigration and Nationality Act, raised grave unconstitutional vagueness concerns because there are no limits to where the process of justice begins and ends. This issue, identified by the Ninth Circuit, was not addressed by the Second or Eighth Circuits despite these courts interpreting the same statutory provision in separate cases. This Comment argues that the Ninth Circuit was correct on ...


Saving Stare Decisis: Preclusion, Precedent, And Procedural Due Process, Max Minzner 2017 Selected Works

Saving Stare Decisis: Preclusion, Precedent, And Procedural Due Process, Max Minzner

Max Minzner

No abstract provided.


The Cure Is Worse: First Circuit Circumvents False Claims Act's First-To-File Rule In United States Ex Rel. Gadbois V. Pharmerica Corp., Daniel Sorger 2017 Boston College Law School

The Cure Is Worse: First Circuit Circumvents False Claims Act's First-To-File Rule In United States Ex Rel. Gadbois V. Pharmerica Corp., Daniel Sorger

Boston College Law Review

In 2015, in United States ex rel. Gadbois v. PharMerica Corp., the U.S. Court of Appeals for the First Circuit held that a qui tam relator could use supplementation to cure a jurisdictional first-to-file defect in a False Claims Act (“FCA”) action. In contrast, in 2010, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit in United States ex rel. Chovanec v. Apria Healthcare Group, Inc. held that relators barred by first-to-file must face dismissal without prejudice and then refile if they are to proceed. Separately, in 2015, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C ...


Too Little Space: Does A Zoning Regulation Violate The Second Amendment?, Jordan Lamson 2017 Boston College Law School

Too Little Space: Does A Zoning Regulation Violate The Second Amendment?, Jordan Lamson

Boston College Law Review

On May 16, 2016, in Teixeira v. County of Alameda, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit held that a zoning ordinance was not presumptively lawful under the Second Amendment. The court utilized the two-step analysis derived from the U.S. Supreme Court’s 2008 decision in District of Columbia v. Heller to examine the constitutionality of the ordinance. The court remanded the case and recommended that the district court apply a heighted level of scrutiny—potentially even strict scrutiny. On December 27, 2016, the Ninth Circuit ordered an en banc rehearing. This Comment argues that on ...


Will Quants Rule The (Legal) World?, Edward K. Cheng 2017 Brooklyn Law School

Will Quants Rule The (Legal) World?, Edward K. Cheng

Edward Cheng

The quants are coming! And they are here to stay-so argues Professor Ian Ayres' in his new book, Super Crunchers, which details the brave new world of statistical prediction and how it has already begun to affect our lives. For years, academic researchers have known about the considerable and at times surprising advantages of statistical models over the considered judgments of experienced clinicians and experts. Today, these models are emerging all over the landscape. Whether the field is wine, baseball, medicine, or consumer relations, they are vying against traditional experts for control over how we make decisions. To be sure ...


Article I Judges In An Article Iii World: The Career Path Of Magistrate Judges, Tracey E. George, Albert H. Yoon 2017 Selected Works

Article I Judges In An Article Iii World: The Career Path Of Magistrate Judges, Tracey E. George, Albert H. Yoon

Tracey George

No abstract provided.


Courts Of Good And Ill Repute: Garoupa And Ginsburg’S Judicial Reputation: A Comparative Theory, Tracey E. George, G. Mitu Gulati 2017 Duke Law School

Courts Of Good And Ill Repute: Garoupa And Ginsburg’S Judicial Reputation: A Comparative Theory, Tracey E. George, G. Mitu Gulati

Tracey George

Nuno Garoupa and Tom Ginsburg have published an ambitious book that seeks to account for the great diversity of judicial systems based, in part, on how courts are designed to marshal the power of a high public opinion of the judiciary. Judges, the book posits, care deeply about their reputations both inside and outside the courts. Courts are designed to capitalize on judges’ desire to maximize their reputation, and judges’ existing stock of reputation can affect the design of the courts which they serve. We find much to like in this book, ranging from its intriguing and ambitious positive claims ...


Religious Symbols And The Law, Hon. Diarmuid F. O'Scannlain 2017 St. John's University School of Law

Religious Symbols And The Law, Hon. Diarmuid F. O'Scannlain

Journal of Catholic Legal Studies

No abstract provided.


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