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Special Court For Sierra Leone: Achieving Justice?, Charles Chernor Jalloh 2017 Florida International University College of Law

Special Court For Sierra Leone: Achieving Justice?, Charles Chernor Jalloh

Charles C. Jalloh

The Sierra Leone war, which lasted between 1991 and 2002, gained notoriety around the world for “blood" or "conflict" diamonds and some of the worst atrocities ever perpetrated against civilians in a modern conflict. On January 16, 2002, the United Nations and the Government of Sierra Leone signed an historic agreement to establish the Special Court for Sierra Leone (SCSL). In setting up a new type of ad hoc criminal tribunal, the parties sought to achieve two key objectives. First, to dispense credible justice by enabling the prosecution of those bearing greatest responsibility for the wartime atrocities based on international ...


A Proposal For Establishing Specialized Federal And State "Takings Courts", John Martinez 2017 University of Maine School of Law

A Proposal For Establishing Specialized Federal And State "Takings Courts", John Martinez

Maine Law Review

Takings doctrine is a mess. Let's just accept that and establish specialized federal and state "takings courts" to adjudicate takings claims. Takings claims arise when governmental conduct is alleged to detrimentally affect private property. Adjudication of takings claims may initially seem straightforward: the Fifth Amendment's Just Compensation Clause, as well as analogous state constitutional provisions, plainly provide that the government shall not take private property for public use without just compensation. In 1978, the United States Supreme Court confessed that takings analysis is hopelessly ad hoc. Decades later, in 2005, the Court abrogated a test for takings that ...


Shaping State Courts For The New Century: What Chief Judges Can Do, Judith S. Kaye 2017 University of Maine School of Law

Shaping State Courts For The New Century: What Chief Judges Can Do, Judith S. Kaye

Maine Law Review

Judge Coffin is an inspiration on so many levels for all of us. But just at this very moment in my own life, I feel that he is speaking personally and directly to me. I am in my own transitioning period, as-in just fifty-five days-my judicial service comes to an end after over twenty-five years, because our state constitution provides for mandatory age retirement. I particularly liked a quotation Judge Coffin included in his article: "Our lives are two/ If we can relish our past life anew." So, under the banner of Law and Public Service, I thought I would ...


Honey, You're No June Cleaver: The Power Of "Dropping Pop" To Persuade, Victoria S. Salzmann 2017 University of Maine School of Law

Honey, You're No June Cleaver: The Power Of "Dropping Pop" To Persuade, Victoria S. Salzmann

Maine Law Review

Imagine a contentious child-custody hearing in which the husband is testifying about his wife's behavior. If he were to state “she is no June Cleaver,” that testimony would have an immediate impact upon those present. Most people would understand that the husband was making a reference to Mrs. Ward Cleaver, the pearl-clad mother figure from the popular 1950s television show Leave It to Beaver. However, the reference does more than simply call to mind 1950s television. It is a vivid popular-culture allusion that immediately taps into the psyche of anyone familiar with the show. It tells the listener that ...


Establishing Guidelines For Attorney Representation Of Criminal Defendants At The Sentencing Phase Of Capital Trials, Adam Lamparello 2017 University of Maine School of Law

Establishing Guidelines For Attorney Representation Of Criminal Defendants At The Sentencing Phase Of Capital Trials, Adam Lamparello

Maine Law Review

In Strickland v. Washington, the United States Supreme Court issued a seminal holding that single-handedly rendered it nearly impossible for a capital defendant to demonstrate that he was the victim of ineffective assistance of counsel at the underlying trial or at sentencing. Indeed, due in substantial part to the fact that "Strickland was not intended to impose rigorous standards on criminal defense attorneys," the Court found ineffective assistance of counsel in only one case over the next sixteen years. Critically, however, during this time, both state and federal courts bore witness to some of the most horrific examples of death ...


Recent Developments, Daisy C. Karlson 2017 University of Arkansas, Fayetteville

Recent Developments, Daisy C. Karlson

Arkansas Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Constitutional Convention And Court Merger In New York State, Jay C. Carlisle, Matthew J. Shock 2017 Elisabeth Haub School of Law at Pace University

The Constitutional Convention And Court Merger In New York State, Jay C. Carlisle, Matthew J. Shock

Pace Law Review

In November 2017, voters in New York, for the first time in twenty years, will be asked to decide whether there “[s]hall be a convention to revise the constitution and amend the same?” If it is decided by the electorate to call a convention, “delegates will be elected in November 2018, and the convention will convene in April 2019.” One of the significant goals of a convention would be the achievement of court merger in the Empire State. The purpose of this perspective is to discuss the pros and cons of a constitutional convention with an emphasis on court ...


The Road To A Constitutional Convention: Reforming The New York State Unified Court System And Expanding Access To Civil Justice, Jonathan Lippman 2017 Latham & Watkins LLP

The Road To A Constitutional Convention: Reforming The New York State Unified Court System And Expanding Access To Civil Justice, Jonathan Lippman

Pace Law Review

This article will focus on the judiciary reforms and access to justice—starting with reforms to the structure of the Unified Court System and discussing other ways that a constitutional convention might serve to improve the operation of the courts. The article will then explore the state’s deficiency in providing its low-income citizens access to justice in civil matters relating to housing, family safety and security, and subsistence income, and how a convention can highlight these issues.


Funding Justice: The Budget Of The Maine Judicial Branch-We Did Get There From Here, Leigh I. Saufley 2017 University of Maine School of Law

Funding Justice: The Budget Of The Maine Judicial Branch-We Did Get There From Here, Leigh I. Saufley

Maine Law Review

The budget for the administration of justice in the State of Maine is a study in contrasts. During the last two decades, the lack of sufficient dollars appropriated to Maine Judicial Branch and the impact that this underfunding has had on people seeking access to justice have created consistent concerns for leaders in the Judicial Branch as well as for those in the Executive and Legislative Branches. Despite these challenges, however, the administrative structure of the Maine Judicial Branch stands as a model for states across the country. Understanding the genesis of this contrast will be critical to planning for ...


An Exposition Of The Effectiveness Of And The Challenges Plaguing Maine's Juvenile Drug Treatment Court Program, Jason E. Rayne 2017 University of Maine School of Law

An Exposition Of The Effectiveness Of And The Challenges Plaguing Maine's Juvenile Drug Treatment Court Program, Jason E. Rayne

Maine Law Review

Since 1989, trial courts across the United States have been developing and implementing the drug court model. Drug courts are treatment-based programs that are considered less adversarial than traditional methods of adjudication. By early in the new millennium, drug courts had “achieved considerable local support and [had] provided intensive, long-term treatment services to offenders with long histories of drug use and criminal justice contacts, previous treatment failures, and high rates of health and social problems.” Drug courts were developed in part to quell the trend of prison overcrowding associated with America’s increased “war on drugs” during the 1980s. Courts ...


Maine's Overdue Judicial Reforms, Peter L. Murray 2017 University of Maine School of Law

Maine's Overdue Judicial Reforms, Peter L. Murray

Maine Law Review

The recent mandate to all organs of Maine state government to make major budget cuts in a time of international economic distress has focused attention on the fiscal and operational condition of Maine’s Judicial Branch. A symposium on March 30, 2009 at the University of Southern Maine presented various perspectives on the role of Maine’s judiciary as the twenty-first century unfolds, and the need for adequate resources to maintain the Judicial Branch as a vital and functioning branch of our tripartite system of government. It is clear that much of the challenge faced by our Judicial Branch is ...


The Impact Of The Current Economy On Access To Justice, Kathleen A. McKee 2017 University of Maine School of Law

The Impact Of The Current Economy On Access To Justice, Kathleen A. Mckee

Maine Law Review

The adequacy of access to justice in the American legal system is not a newly emergent issue. Discussion acknowledging this right dates back to colonial times. For example, in 1932, the United States Supreme Court noted in the case of Powell v. Alabama that the right to counsel in criminal proceedings can be traced back to colonial times in America. The Court remarked that the right to be heard must encompass the right to be heard by counsel if it is to be meaningful. In the ongoing dialogue on this issue, primacy has been given to the right of criminal ...


Reflections Of An Access To Justice Chair, Kermit V. Lipez 2017 University of Maine School of Law

Reflections Of An Access To Justice Chair, Kermit V. Lipez

Maine Law Review

From January 2001 to January 2008, I had the privilege of serving as the Chair of Maine’s Justice Action Group. In the legal services world, the Justice Action Group is known as an “Access to Justice” entity. Most states have such entities. Although the missions of these entities may vary somewhat from state to state, they share the same general goals—to increase the resources available to the organizations providing free or reduced fee legal services to low income, disadvantaged, and elderly citizens, and to maximize the use of these resources through coordinated efforts. In Maine, the Justice Action ...


The World Is Round: Why We Must Assure Equal Access To Civil Justice, Jon D. Levy 2017 University of Maine School of Law

The World Is Round: Why We Must Assure Equal Access To Civil Justice, Jon D. Levy

Maine Law Review

In 1972, the astronauts of Apollo 17, NASA’s final manned-mission to the Moon, took a photograph of the entire hemisphere of Earth. The photograph shows the continents of Africa and Antarctica in hues of red and brown, surrounded by the vibrant blue oceans and topped by swirling white clouds. It has become an iconic image. Studying the Earth from afar, Eugene Cernan, Apollo 17’s commander, reported to the Houston command center with just a touch of irony: “We’re not the first to discover this, but we’d like to confirm, from the crew of Apollo 17, that ...


A Foundation Upon Which Justice Is Built: The Chicago Bar Foundation's Innovations To Improve Access To Justice During Tough Economic Times, Danielle Elyce Hirsch 2017 University of Maine School of Law

A Foundation Upon Which Justice Is Built: The Chicago Bar Foundation's Innovations To Improve Access To Justice During Tough Economic Times, Danielle Elyce Hirsch

Maine Law Review

“Equal justice for all” is one of the United States’ most proudly proclaimed principles, embellished on courthouse entrances and regularly cited in constitutional decisions. The Illinois Constitution also contains a strong commitment to equal and unimpeded access to our legal system for all of our citizens: “Every person shall find a certain remedy in the laws for all injuries and wrongs which he receives to his person, privacy, property or reputation. He shall obtain justice by law, freely, completely and promptly.” Notwithstanding these constitutional principles, a large number of people with urgent and important issues at stake—such as the ...


Funding The Judicial Department At A Level The Supreme Judicial Court Deems "Essential To Its Existence And Functioning As A Court" Is Required By Doctrines Of Comity And Duties Imposed By Maine's Constitution, Orlando E. Delogu 2017 University of Maine School of Law

Funding The Judicial Department At A Level The Supreme Judicial Court Deems "Essential To Its Existence And Functioning As A Court" Is Required By Doctrines Of Comity And Duties Imposed By Maine's Constitution, Orlando E. Delogu

Maine Law Review

This Article develops ideas and arguments relative to judicial funding initially advanced by this Author in two op-ed pieces previously published in the Maine Lawyers Review. Beyond elaborating and more carefully documenting (with footnote references) points previously made, this Article undertakes to lay out the judicial department’s unique status as one of three co-equal and coordinate branches of Maine’s governmental structure. It is this status that separates the judicial department from all of the other agencies of state government. The Article further argues that this status gives rise to a duty on the part of the legislative and ...


Introduction: Accessing Justice-Its Past, Present, And Future, Frank M. Coffin 2017 University of Maine School of Law

Introduction: Accessing Justice-Its Past, Present, And Future, Frank M. Coffin

Maine Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Judge And His Clerks, Barbara F. Riegelhaupt, Kaighn Smith Jr., J. Peter Byrne 2017 University of Maine School of Law

The Judge And His Clerks, Barbara F. Riegelhaupt, Kaighn Smith Jr., J. Peter Byrne

Maine Law Review

In his memoir, Life and Times in the Three Branches, Judge Coffin recounts the history of the institution of the law clerk and observes, “I was the first such creature Maine had seen.” He served as a clerk from April 1947 to June 1949 for United States District Court Judge John D. Clifford, working in the same chambers that he would later inhabit as a judge. Over the course of his more than four decades on the Court of Appeals, Judge Coffin would have sixty-eight clerks of his own. Those of us lucky enough to be in that family of ...


The Speeches Of Frank M. Coffin: A Sideline To Judging, Daniel E. Wathen, Barbara Riegelhaupt 2017 University of Maine School of Law

The Speeches Of Frank M. Coffin: A Sideline To Judging, Daniel E. Wathen, Barbara Riegelhaupt

Maine Law Review

The Authors of this Article are engaged in a separate project to publish the full collection of law-related speeches delivered by Judge Coffin during his tenure on the bench. That collection in its entirety consists of more than 125 speeches, and it is a treasure trove of thoughts on the judiciary as an institution, the law, judging, the legal profession, legal education, and legal luminaries past and present. The speeches are also worthy of study purely as examples of communication, advocacy, speechcraft, composition, humor, and whimsy. Within the confines of this Article, the modest goal is to provide samples of ...


In His Own Words: Judge Coffin And Workability, William C. Kelly Jr. 2017 University of Maine School of Law

In His Own Words: Judge Coffin And Workability, William C. Kelly Jr.

Maine Law Review

Early in his judicial career, Judge Coffin proffered the concept of “workability” as one of the core factors in judging. Justice and Workability: Un Essai, his first published reflection on this idea, appeared in the Suffolk University Law Review in 1971. To frame the discussion, he started with a formal definition: “[T]he extent to which a rule protecting a right, enforcing a duty, or setting a standard of conduct—which is consistent with and in the interests of social justice—can be pronounced with reasonable expectation of effective observance without impairing the essential functioning of those to whom the ...


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