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Corporate Conspiracy: How Not Calling A Conspiracy A Conspiracy Is Warping The Law On Corporate Wrongdoing, Josephine Sandler Nelson 2015 SelectedWorks

Corporate Conspiracy: How Not Calling A Conspiracy A Conspiracy Is Warping The Law On Corporate Wrongdoing, Josephine Sandler Nelson

J.S. Nelson

The intracorporate conspiracy doctrine immunizes an enterprise and its agents from conspiracy prosecution based on the legal fiction that an enterprise and its agents are a single actor incapable of the meeting of two minds to form a conspiracy. The doctrine, however, misplaces incentives in contravention of agency law, criminal law, tort law, and public policy. As a result, harmful behavior is ordered and performed without consequences, and the victims of the behavior suffer without appropriate remedy.

Especially in the wake of the financial crisis, prosecutors and the public are searching for new tools to combat corporate conspiracy. The most ...


Unreasonable Doubt: Warren Hill, Aedpa, And The Unconstitutionality Of Georgia's Reasonable Doubt Standard, Adam Lamparello 2015 SelectedWorks

Unreasonable Doubt: Warren Hill, Aedpa, And The Unconstitutionality Of Georgia's Reasonable Doubt Standard, Adam Lamparello

Adam Lamparello

Georgia’s “beyond a reasonable doubt” standard for determining intellectual disability has led to an absurd—and arbitrary—result. A Georgia state court held that defendant Warren Hill was intellectually disabled, yet still sentenced Hill to death. Seven experts—and the court—deemed Hill disabled under a preponderance of the evidence standard. He remains on death row, however, because Georgia’s “preposterous burden of proof” requires that intellectual disability be proved beyond a reasonable doubt, a standard experts have said is nearly impossible to satisfy. It “effectively limits the constitutional right protected in Atkins,” and creates a conditional, not categorical ...


Talking Points, Alex Stein, Jef De Mot 2015 SelectedWorks

Talking Points, Alex Stein, Jef De Mot

Alex Stein

Our civil liability system affords numerous defenses against every single violation of the law. Against every single claim raised by the plaintiff, the defendant can assert two or more defenses each of which gives him an opportunity to win the case. As a result, when a court erroneously strikes out a meritorious defense, it might still keep the defendant out of harm’s way by granting him another defense. Rightful plaintiffs, on the other hand, must convince the court to deny each and every defense asserted by the defendant. Any rate of adjudicative errors—random and completely unbiased—consequently increases ...


The Death Of Tax Court Exceptionalism, Stephanie Hoffer, Christopher J. Walker 2014 SelectedWorks

The Death Of Tax Court Exceptionalism, Stephanie Hoffer, Christopher J. Walker

Christopher J. Walker

Tax exceptionalism—the view that tax law does not have to play by the administrative law rules that govern the rest of the regulatory state—has come under attack in recent years. In 2011, the Supreme Court rejected such exceptionalism by holding that judicial review of the Treasury Department’s interpretations of the tax code is subject to the same Chevron deference regime that applies throughout the administrative state. The D.C. Circuit followed suit by rejecting the IRS’s position that its notices are not subject to judicial review under the Administrative Procedure Act (APA). This Article calls for ...


California Egg Toss - The High Costs Of Avoiding Unenforceable Surrogacy Contracts, Jennifer Jackson 2014 University of San Diego

California Egg Toss - The High Costs Of Avoiding Unenforceable Surrogacy Contracts, Jennifer Jackson

Jennifer Jackson

In an emotionally charged decision regarding surrogacy contracts, it is important to recognize the ramifications, costs, and policy. There are advantages to both “gestational carrier surrogacy” contracts and “traditional surrogacy” contracts. However, this paper focuses on the differences between these contracts using case law. Specifically, this paper will focus on the implications of California case law regarding surrogacy contracts. Cases such as Johnson v. Calvert and In Re Marriage of Moschetta provide a clear distinction between these contracts. This distinction will show that while gestational carrier surrogacy contracts are more expensive, public policy and court opinions will provide certainty and ...


Is It Time For The Court To Accept The O.F.F.E.R.? Applying Smith V. Organization Of Foster Families For Equality And Reform To Promote Clarity, Consistency, And Federalism In The World Of De Facto Parenthood, Eric A. DeGroff, Steven W. Fitschen 2014 SelectedWorks

Is It Time For The Court To Accept The O.F.F.E.R.? Applying Smith V. Organization Of Foster Families For Equality And Reform To Promote Clarity, Consistency, And Federalism In The World Of De Facto Parenthood, Eric A. Degroff, Steven W. Fitschen

Eric A DeGroff

The question of psychological, or de facto, parents and their rights versus biological or adoptive parents has been percolating through the state and lower federal courts for some years. Given the disparity in approaches and the constitutional issues implicated, it is likely that the Supreme Court will take up this issue, and it may well do so in the near future. When it does, it is imperative that the Court adopt a test that will serve American society and her children and families well. This article proposes such a test.

The argument could be made that, absent a finding of ...


The Rules Of Engagement, David D. Butler 2014 SelectedWorks

The Rules Of Engagement, David D. Butler

David D. Butler

First impressions are the eye of the needle through which all subsequent threads are drawn. Zealous advocates take conrol of the Courtroom even before the prosecution is through the door. Get to the Courtroom first.

Secure the table and chairs closer to the jury. Pick up all the chalk by the black board. When the befuddled county attorney is looking for a piece of chalk, hand him or her a nice new piece from the box you have in your attache case. Zealous advocates get to the Courtroom fiirst, with the most.

Often, a zealous advocate can lift his or ...


Breaking The Ice: How Plaintiffs May Establish Premises Liability In "Black Ice" Cases Where The Dangerous Condition Is By Definition Not Visible Or Apparent To The Property Owner, Hon. Mark C. Dillon 2014 SelectedWorks

Breaking The Ice: How Plaintiffs May Establish Premises Liability In "Black Ice" Cases Where The Dangerous Condition Is By Definition Not Visible Or Apparent To The Property Owner, Hon. Mark C. Dillon

Hon. Mark C. Dillon

Plaintiffs that are injured as a result of encounters with "black ice," as distinguished from regular ice, face peculiar difficulties in establishing liability against property owners for the dangerous icy conditions on their premises. Black ice results from a unique process under certain conditions by which air bubbles are expelled from water during the freezing process, rendering the ice virtually invisible to the naked eye. Property owners therefore are not typically on actual or constructive notice of black ice conditions as to become subject to the legal requirement of undertaking measures to remedy the conditions. This article explores the law ...


Matevosyan Nr (2014). Dissociative Identity Disorder In The Courtroom, 2014 SelectedWorks

Matevosyan Nr (2014). Dissociative Identity Disorder In The Courtroom

Naira R. Matevosyan (Naira Roland Matevosyan)

RATIONALE: Dissociative identity disorder (DID) has been raised to defend a variety of criminal offenses or to moderate the civil suits. Applying traditional rules of criminal culpability or civil liability to these cases poses a significant challenge. Diagnostic exclusions of identity-versus-personality alters are rare, with exceptions of the explicit memory transfer to be the key to deny the dissociated identity, and the absence of implicit memory transfer be held as personality dissociation.

OBJECTIVE: An attempt was made to study judicial determinants toward a facile consistency whether individuals with DID should be held culpable or liable.

METHODS: Rules, issues, precedents, verdicts ...


Riley V. California: Privacy Still Matters, But How Much And In What Contexts?, Adam Lamparello, Charles E. MacLean 2014 SelectedWorks

Riley V. California: Privacy Still Matters, But How Much And In What Contexts?, Adam Lamparello, Charles E. Maclean

Adam Lamparello

Private information is no longer stored only in homes or other areas traditionally protected from warrantless intrusion. The private lives of many citizens are contained in digital devices no larger than the palm of their hand—and carried in public places. But that does not make the data within a cell phone any less private, just as the dialing of a phone number does not voluntarily waive an individual’s right to keep their call log or location private. Remember that we are not talking exclusively about individuals suspected of committing violent crimes. The Government is recording the calls and ...


Balancing The Scales: Adhuc Sub Judice Li Est Or Trial By Media, Casey J. Cooper 2014 SelectedWorks

Balancing The Scales: Adhuc Sub Judice Li Est Or Trial By Media, Casey J. Cooper

Casey J Cooper

The right to freedom of expression and free press is recognized under almost all major human rights instruments and domestic legal systems—common and civil—in the world. However, what do you do when a fundamental right conflicts with another equally fundamental right, like the right to a fair trial? In the United States, the freedom of speech, encompassing the freedom of the press, goes nearly unfettered: the case is not the same for other common law countries. In light of cultural and historic facts, institutional factors, modern realities, and case-law, this Article contends that current American jurisprudence does not ...


A Failure To Supervise: How The Bureaucracy And The Courts Abandoned Their Intended Roles Under Erisa, Lauren R. Roth 2014 Pace University

A Failure To Supervise: How The Bureaucracy And The Courts Abandoned Their Intended Roles Under Erisa, Lauren R. Roth

Pace Law Review

This Article addresses how courts failed to adequately supervise employers administering pension plans before ERISA. Relying on a number of different legal theories—from an initial theory that pensions were gratuities offered by employers to the recognition that pension promises could create contractual rights—the courts repeatedly found ways to allow employers to promise much and provide little to workers expecting retirement security. In Section III, this Article addresses how Congress failed to create an effective structure for strong bureaucratic enforcement and the bureaucratic agencies with enforcement responsibilities failed to fulfill those functions. Finally, in Section IV, this Article discusses ...


Screening Out Innovation: The Merits Of Meritless Litigation, Alexander A. Reinert 2014 Maurer School of Law: Indiana University

Screening Out Innovation: The Merits Of Meritless Litigation, Alexander A. Reinert

Indiana Law Journal

Courts and legislatures often conflate meritless and frivolous cases when balancing the desire to keep courthouse doors open to novel or unlikely claims against the concern that entertaining ultimately unsuccessful litigation will prove too costly for courts and defendants. Recently, significant procedural and substantive barriers to civil litigation have been informed by judicial and legislative assumptions about the costs of entertaining meritless and frivolous litigation. The prevailing wisdom is that eliminating meritless and frivolous claims as early in a case’s trajectory as possible will focus scarce resources on the truly meritorious cases, thereby ensuring that available remedies are properly ...


E-Citation $5 Fee Authorized In Tennessee, Karen Blake 2014 SelectedWorks

E-Citation $5 Fee Authorized In Tennessee, Karen Blake

Karen Blake

A short description of recent legislation permitting Tennessee cities to adopt a $5 e-citation fee for a period of 5 years.


Retroactivity And Prospectivity Of Judgments In American Law, Richard Kay 2014 SelectedWorks

Retroactivity And Prospectivity Of Judgments In American Law, Richard Kay

Richard Kay

In every American jurisdiction, new rules of law announced by a court are presumed to have retrospective effect—that is, they are presumed to apply to events occurring before the date of judgment. There are, however, exceptions in certain cases where a court believes that such application of the new rule will upset serious and reasonable reliance on the prior state of the law. This essay, a substantially abridged version of the United States Report on the subject, submitted at the Nineteenth International Congress of Comparative Law, summarizes these exceptional cases. It shows that the proper occasions for issuing exclusively ...


Questioning The U.S. Supreme Court’S Legalistic Qualified Immunity Approach And Suggestions For A Better Approach, Robert Weems 2014 SelectedWorks

Questioning The U.S. Supreme Court’S Legalistic Qualified Immunity Approach And Suggestions For A Better Approach, Robert Weems

Robert Weems

No abstract provided.


Monge V. Maya Magazines, Inc.: The Demand For Celebrity Gossip And The Doctrine Of Transformative Use In The Ninth Circuit, Alyce W. Foshee 2014 Golden Gate University School of Law

Monge V. Maya Magazines, Inc.: The Demand For Celebrity Gossip And The Doctrine Of Transformative Use In The Ninth Circuit, Alyce W. Foshee

Golden Gate University Law Review

Despite the decreased circulation of traditional newspapers, celebrity gossip magazines continue to flourish in the publishing world. In June 2012, People Magazine reached a paid circulation of over 3.5 million copies, putting the publication at number nine on the top U.S. consumer magazines list for the first half of the year. Public demand for celebrity news and gossip is unwavering. With this popularity come problems - especially for those celebrities whose images end up supplying that high demand. In Monge v. Maya Magazines, Inc., the Ninth Circuit presided over a copyright battle between celebrities and a gossip magazine regarding ...


Introduction, The Honorable Richard R. Clifton 2014 Golden Gate University School of Law

Introduction, The Honorable Richard R. Clifton

Golden Gate University Law Review

No abstract provided.


Judges Of The United States Court Of Appeals For The Ninth Circuit, 2014 Golden Gate University School of Law

Judges Of The United States Court Of Appeals For The Ninth Circuit

Golden Gate University Law Review

No abstract provided.


Table Of Contents, 2014 Golden Gate University School of Law

Table Of Contents

Golden Gate University Law Review

No abstract provided.


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