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A Material World: Using Trademark Law To Override Copyright's First Sale Rule For Imported Copies, Mary LaFrance 2015 William S. Boyd School of Law, UNLV

A Material World: Using Trademark Law To Override Copyright's First Sale Rule For Imported Copies, Mary Lafrance

Michigan Telecommunications and Technology Law Review

When the Supreme Court held that the first sale rule of copyright law permits the unauthorized importation and domestic sale of lawfully made copies of copyrighted works, regardless of where those copies were made, copyright owners lost much of their ability to engage in territorial price discrimination. Publishers, film and record producers, and software and videogame makers could no longer use copyright law to prevent the importation and domestic resale of gray market copies, and therefore could no longer protect their domestic distributors against competition from cheaper imported copies. However, many of these copyright owners can take advantage of a ...


After Myriad: Reconsidering The Incentives For Innovation In The Biotech Industry, Daniel K. Yarbrough 2015 University of Michigan

After Myriad: Reconsidering The Incentives For Innovation In The Biotech Industry, Daniel K. Yarbrough

Michigan Telecommunications and Technology Law Review

35 U.S.C. § 101 allows a patent for “any new and useful process, machine, manufacture, or composition of matter, or any new and useful improvement thereof.” Recently, the Supreme Court issued several key decisions affecting the doctrine of patentable subject matter under § 101. Starting with Bilski v. Kappos (2011), and continuing with Mayo Collaborative Services, Inc. v. Prometheus Laboratories (2012), Association for Molecular Pathology v. Myriad Genetics (2013) and, most recently, Alice Corporation Pty. Ltd. v. CLS Bank International (2014), every year has brought another major change to the way in which the Court assesses patentability. In Myriad, the ...


District Courts Versus The Usitc: Considering Exclusionary Relief For F/Rand-Encumbered Standard-Essential Patents, Helen H. Ji 2015 University of Michigan

District Courts Versus The Usitc: Considering Exclusionary Relief For F/Rand-Encumbered Standard-Essential Patents, Helen H. Ji

Michigan Telecommunications and Technology Law Review

Technological standards allow manufacturers and consumers to rely upon these agreed-upon basic systems to facilitate sales and further invention. However, where these standards involved patented technology, the process of standard-setting raises many concerns at the intersection of antitrust and patent law. As patent holders advocate for their patents to become part of technological standards, how should courts police this activity to prevent patent holdup and other anti-competitive practices? This Note explores the differing approaches to remedies employed by the United States International Trade Commission and the United States District Courts where standard-essential patents are infringed. This Note further proposes that ...


Riley V. California: A Pyrric Victory For Privacy, Adam Lamparello 2015 Indiana Tech Law School

Riley V. California: A Pyrric Victory For Privacy, Adam Lamparello

Adam Lamparello

In Riley v. California, the United States Supreme Court ushered privacy protections into the digital era and signaled that the Fourth Amendment would not become a constitutional afterthought. The Court unanimously held that, absent exigent circumstances, law enforcement officers could not search any area of an arrestee’s cell phone, including the outgoing call log, without a warrant and probable cause. At first glance, Riley appears to be a landmark decision in favor of individual privacy rights. As with most things, however, the devil is in the details, and the details in Riley make any celebration over the seemingly enhanced ...


Riley V. California: A Pyrric Victory For Privacy, Adam Lamparello 2015 Indiana Tech Law School

Riley V. California: A Pyrric Victory For Privacy, Adam Lamparello

Adam Lamparello

In Riley v. California, the United States Supreme Court ushered privacy protections into the digital era and signaled that the Fourth Amendment would not become a constitutional afterthought. The Court unanimously held that, absent exigent circumstances, law enforcement officers could not search any area of an arrestee’s cell phone, including the outgoing call log, without a warrant and probable cause. At first glance, Riley appears to be a landmark decision in favor of individual privacy rights. As with most things, however, the devil is in the details, and the details in Riley make any celebration over the seemingly enhanced ...


When Peace Is Not The Goal Of A Class Action Settlement, D. Theodore Rave 2015 University of Houston Law Center

When Peace Is Not The Goal Of A Class Action Settlement, D. Theodore Rave

D. Theodore Rave

On the conventional account, a class action settlement is a vehicle through which the defendant buys peace from the class action lawyer. That single transaction will preclude future litigation by all class members. But peace, at least through preclusion, may not always be the goal. In a recent Fair Credit Reporting Action (FCRA) case, In re Trans Union Privacy Litigation, the parties agreed to a class action settlement that did not preclude individual claims. The 190 million class members surrendered only their rights to participate in a future class or aggregate action; they remained free to march right back into ...


Introduction: Reflections From A Time Of (Near) Disaster And Renewal, Cathy Catterson 2015 United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit

Introduction: Reflections From A Time Of (Near) Disaster And Renewal, Cathy Catterson

Golden Gate University Law Review

In welcoming the latest edition of the Golden Gate University Law Review’s annual Ninth Circuit Survey, the Ninth Circuit’s Court and Circuit Executive reflects on the 25th Anniversary of the Loma Prieta earthquake and its impact on the court.


Forum Selling, Daniel M. Klerman, Greg Reilly 2015 USC Law School

Forum Selling, Daniel M. Klerman, Greg Reilly

University of Southern California Legal Studies Working Paper Series

Forum shopping is problematic because it may lead to forum selling. For diverse motives, including prestige, local benefits, or re-election, some judges want to hear more cases. When plaintiffs have wide choice of forum, such judges have incentives to make the law more pro-plaintiff, because plaintiffs choose the court. While only a few judges may be motivated to attract more cases, their actions can have large effects, because their courts will attract a disproportionate share of cases. For example, judges in the Eastern District of Texas have distorted the rules and practices relating to case assignment, joinder, discovery, transfer, and ...


“Islamic Law” In Us Courts: Judicial Jihad Or Constitutional Imperative?, Faisal Kutty 2015 Pepperdine University

“Islamic Law” In Us Courts: Judicial Jihad Or Constitutional Imperative?, Faisal Kutty

Pepperdine Law Review

At the beginning of 2014, about a dozen states introduced or re-introduced bills to ban the use of Sharī’ah law. They hope to join the seven states that have ostensibly banned it to date. Anti-Sharī’ah advocates have cited a number of cases to back their tenuous claim that Sharī’ah is stealthily sneaking in through the doctrine of comity, but a close examination of the cases they cite contradicts their claim. Comity, when one court defers to the jurisdiction of another, has been accepted and denied based on legal principles and public policy, on a case-by-case basis. There ...


Conceptions Of Religion In The Secular State: Evolving Turkish Secularism, Seval Yildirim 2015 Pepperdine University

Conceptions Of Religion In The Secular State: Evolving Turkish Secularism, Seval Yildirim

Pepperdine Law Review

The article focuses on the concepts of religion in secular states such as Republic of Turkey. Topics discussed include distinction between secularism and religion, views of philosopher of liberalism John Locke on delegation of matters of faith to the Church and matters of public good to the state along with the relationship of modernization and secularism.


Foreign And Religious Family Law: Comity, Contract, And The Constitution, Ann Laquer Estin 2015 Pepperdine University

Foreign And Religious Family Law: Comity, Contract, And The Constitution, Ann Laquer Estin

Pepperdine Law Review

The article focuses on role of the U.S. courts in confronting religious laws in dispute resolution of various cases of domestic relations, contracts, and torts. Topics discussed include role of secular courts in maintaining constitutional balance between the free exercise and establishment clauses, constitutional challenges faced by religious adherents, and importance of legal pluralism in the U.S.


Rethinking The “Religious-Question” Doctrine, Christopher C. Lund 2015 Pepperdine University

Rethinking The “Religious-Question” Doctrine, Christopher C. Lund

Pepperdine Law Review

The “religious question” doctrine is a well-known and commonly accepted notion about the First Amendment’s Religion Clauses. The general idea is that, in our system of separated church and state, courts do not decide religious questions. And from this premise, many things flow — including the idea that courts must dismiss otherwise justiciable controversies when they would require courts to resolve religious questions. Yet a vexing thought arises. The religious-question doctrine traditionally comes out of a notion that secular courts cannot resolve metaphysical or theological issues. But when one looks at the cases that courts have been dismissing pursuant to ...


Religious Tribunals And Secular Courts: Navigating Power And Powerlessness, Michelle Greenberg-Kobrin 2015 Pepperdine University

Religious Tribunals And Secular Courts: Navigating Power And Powerlessness, Michelle Greenberg-Kobrin

Pepperdine Law Review

In this article, the author discusses the ways such as common law, and contracts employed by religious systems for navigating their relationship with legal systems of secular states. Topics discussed include the role of religious contracts in helping religious systems negotiate with secularism, the role of religious contracts in protecting autonomy of religious systems, and the structure of marriage and divorce in Jewish law.


Introduction: Religious Law In The 21st Century, Michael A. Helfand 2015 Pepperdine University

Introduction: Religious Law In The 21st Century, Michael A. Helfand

Pepperdine Law Review

An introduction is presented in which the editor discusses various articles present in symposium including role of the U.S. courts in interpreting religious laws, practice of religious laws in secular states, and political, and legal structures of Jewish and Islamic identities.


Insurance Agent Who Provided Carrier's Valuation And Two Competing Quotes Did Not Counsel The Insured And Create A Special Relationship, Mohamad Ali Ali Yousefkhani Mr 2015 Michigan State University College of Law

Insurance Agent Who Provided Carrier's Valuation And Two Competing Quotes Did Not Counsel The Insured And Create A Special Relationship, Mohamad Ali Ali Yousefkhani Mr

Mohamad Ali Ali Yousefkhani

No abstract provided.


Petitioning Foreign Governments: The Act Of State And Noerr-Pennington Doctrines, Don R. Sampen 2015 Jenner & Block

Petitioning Foreign Governments: The Act Of State And Noerr-Pennington Doctrines, Don R. Sampen

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


Impartiality And Independence: Misunderstood Cousins, James E. Moliterno 2015 Washington and Lee University School of Law

Impartiality And Independence: Misunderstood Cousins, James E. Moliterno

James E. Moliterno

No abstract provided.


Jones, Lackey, And Teague, Richard Broughton 2015 University of Detroit Mercy School of Law

Jones, Lackey, And Teague, Richard Broughton

Richard Broughton

In a recent, high-profile ruling, a federal court finally recognized that a substantial delay in executing a death row inmate violated the Eighth Amendment’s ban on cruel and unusual punishments. Courts have repeatedly rejected these so-called “Lackey claims,” making the federal court’s decision in Jones v. Chappell all the more important. And yet it was deeply flawed. This paper focuses on one of the major flaws in the Jones decision that largely escaped attention: the application of the non-retroactivity rule from Teague v. Lane. By comprehensively addressing the merits of the Teague bar as applied to Lackey claims ...


More Harm Than Good? Erwin Chemerinsky's Case Against The Supreme Court, ofer raban 2015 university of oregon school of law

More Harm Than Good? Erwin Chemerinsky's Case Against The Supreme Court, Ofer Raban

ofer raban

Erwin Chemerinsky’s The Case Against the Supreme Court is a about an alleged institutional failure: the failure of the U.S. Supreme Court to protect vulnerable groups from repressive electoral majorities, from powerful interests, and from official abuses of power. The indictment consists of a long list of cases covering most of American history. It includes the failure to mitigate the injustices of slavery; the failure to extend equality to African Americans after the Civil War; the failure to protect free speech at times of war or national crisis; the failure to protect employees and consumers from corporate lawbreakers ...


Post-Sentencing Appellate Waivers, Kevin Bennardo 2015 Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law

Post-Sentencing Appellate Waivers, Kevin Bennardo

University of Michigan Journal of Law Reform

A sentencing appellate waiver is a criminal defendant’s promise not to appeal her sentence. These provisions routinely appear in federal defendants’ plea agreements. With a few narrow exceptions, a knowing and voluntary sentencing appellate waiver bars a defendant from appealing all issues within the waiver’s scope. Using models of judicial behavior and empirical studies, this Article argues that the inclusion of sentencing appellate waivers in plea agreements creates bargaining inefficiencies and removes important incentives from the sentencing process. As a solution, the Article proposes that sentencing appellate waivers should take the form of separate post-sentencing agreements.


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