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Are Justices Ginsburg And Scalia Disabling The Enabling Act, Or Is Shady Grove Just Another Bad Opera?, Robert J. Condlin 2016 University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law

Are Justices Ginsburg And Scalia Disabling The Enabling Act, Or Is Shady Grove Just Another Bad Opera?, Robert J. Condlin

Faculty Scholarship

After seventy years of trying, the Supreme Court has yet to agree on whether the Rules Enabling Act articulates a one or two part standard for determining the validity of a Federal Rule. Is it enough that a Federal Rule regulates “practice and procedure,” or must it also not “abridge substantive rights”? The Enabling Act seems to require both, but the Court is not so sure, and the costs of its uncertainty are real. Among other things, litigants must guess whether the decision to apply a Federal Rule in a given case will depend upon predictable ritual, judicial power grab ...


Public Accounting And The Myth Of The Public Interest.Pdf, Wm. Dennis Huber 2016

Public Accounting And The Myth Of The Public Interest.Pdf, Wm. Dennis Huber

Wm. Dennis Huber

For decades it has been drummed into the conscience, the consciousness, and the subconscious of accounting students, researchers, and practitioners alike that the public interest is the sine qua non of the public accounting profession. Accounting researchers have attempted to explore the multi-faceted nature of what is referred to as the public interest based on the assumption that the public interest actually exists in the public accounting profession (including professional accounting organizations, government and quasi-government regulatory agencies, and auditing and accounting standard setting bodies). This paper questions that assumption by conducting an exegesis of the texts of the legislative findings ...


Litigating In The 21st Century: Amending Challenges For Cause In Light Of Big Data, Andrew Kasabian 2016 Pepperdine University

Litigating In The 21st Century: Amending Challenges For Cause In Light Of Big Data, Andrew Kasabian

Pepperdine Law Review

The amount of data generated daily is growing exponentially. The majority of this data is unstructured data. Big Data analytics provides the capability to analyze sets of unrelated data to find hidden and meaningful correlations and predict an individual’s future actions. Therefore, Big Data can alter trial preparation by opening up new sets of information for lawyers to analyze in the jury selection process. Privacy concerns may follow Big Data’s incorporation because Big Data aggregates an individual’s information and predicts future actions. This Comment details how Big Data will provide a net benefit to trial preparation. In ...


Lessons From History: The Recent Applicability Of Matrimonial Property And Human Rights Legislation On Reserve Lands In Canada, Stacey L. MacTaggart 2016 University of Western Ontario

Lessons From History: The Recent Applicability Of Matrimonial Property And Human Rights Legislation On Reserve Lands In Canada, Stacey L. Mactaggart

Western Journal of Legal Studies

The 1986 decisions of Derrickson v Derrickson and Paul v Paul highlighted the legislative gaps in the Indian Act with respect to the division of on-reserve matrimonial property. Provincial family property legislation could not apply to account for the absence of matrimonial land rights provisions in the federal Indian Act. This is because the Supreme Court of Canada rigidly applied the doctrine of interjurisdictional immunity. Indigenous women have been disproportionately affected by the lack of on-reserve matrimonial real property provisions. The recent enactment of the Family Homes on Reserves and Matrimonial Interests or Rights Act (MIRA) is meant to finally ...


Reconsidering The Constitutionality Of Mandatory Minimum Sentences Under Section 231(5)(E) Post-Luxton, Laura Metcalfe 2016 University of Ottawa Faculty of Law

Reconsidering The Constitutionality Of Mandatory Minimum Sentences Under Section 231(5)(E) Post-Luxton, Laura Metcalfe

Western Journal of Legal Studies

Section 231(5)(e) of the Criminal Code elevates murder to first-degree murder when a death is caused while committing unlawful confinement per s. 279 of the Criminal Code. The corresponding mandatory sentence is life imprisonment with no eligibility for parole until 25 years have been served. The Supreme Court of Canada held that this provision was constitutional in R v Luxton, since it did not violate the principles of fundamental justice and was not considered cruel and unusual punishment, contrary to s. 7 and 12 of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, respectively.

However, lower courts ought to ...


Florida's Stand Your Ground Regime: Legislative Direction, Prosecutorial Discretion, Public Pressures, And The Legitimization Of The Criminal Justice System, Mary Elizabeth Castillo 2016 Notre Dame Law School

Florida's Stand Your Ground Regime: Legislative Direction, Prosecutorial Discretion, Public Pressures, And The Legitimization Of The Criminal Justice System, Mary Elizabeth Castillo

Journal of Legislation

This note seeks to examine the tripartite relationship between legislative delegation, prosecutorial discretion, and public pressures in the context of Florida's "Stand Your Ground" regime. In the context of high profile criminal cases, a prosecutor faces significant public and political pressures that may influence her exercise of discretion in that case. Ultimately, Castillo argues that when a prosecutor succumbs to these pressures, it undermines her expertise, experience and exercise of discretion, and undercuts the legitimacy of the criminal justice system as a whole.


Jurisdiction, Choice Of Law And Property, Daniel M. Klerman 2016 USC Law School

Jurisdiction, Choice Of Law And Property, Daniel M. Klerman

University of Southern California Legal Studies Working Paper Series

Jurisdiction and choice of law in property disputes has been remarkably stable. The situs rule, which requires adjudication where the property is located and application of that state’s law, remains the norm in most of the world. This article is the first to apply modern economic analysis to choice of law and jurisdiction in property disputes. It largely confirms the wisdom of the situs rule, but suggests some situations where other rules may be superior. For example, in disputes about stolen art, the state where the work was last undisputedly owned may be both the most efficient forum and ...


Rethinking Personal Jurisdiction, Daniel M. Klerman 2016 USC Law School

Rethinking Personal Jurisdiction, Daniel M. Klerman

University of Southern California Legal Studies Working Paper Series

This article sets out a pragmatic justification for the main features of current personal jurisdiction doctrine. According to that justification, personal jurisdiction rules minimize litigation costs and bias. This approach to personal jurisdiction helps resolve difficult and open jurisdictional issues, such as the scope of general jurisdiction and the validity of jurisdiction based on the stream-of-commerce theory. This article then explores the empirical assumptions underlying this pragmatic explanation for current doctrine and shows how doctrine should change if those empirical assumptions were incorrect. For example, the Supreme Court’s “purposeful availment” requirement is justified only if the danger of bias ...


Advocacy For Marriage Equality: The Power Of A Broad Historical Narrative During A Transitional Period In Civil Rights, Charles R. Calleros 2016 Arizona State University

Advocacy For Marriage Equality: The Power Of A Broad Historical Narrative During A Transitional Period In Civil Rights, Charles R. Calleros

Charles R. Calleros

Previous civil rights movements in the United States define broad historical patterns that form a narrative helpful to a proper understanding of new controversies. In essence, as a society we often could benefit from a reminder that our actions today will form the history for future generations, who will judge us with benefit of hindsight and a broader perspective. With each new civil rights controversy, we owe it to ourselves and to the victims of discrimination to ask whether we are once again in a period of transition, where conventional mores will soon sound as jarring as Justice Bradley’s ...


How To Get Away With Career Murder: The Unconstitutional Blueprint For Systematically Purging Whistleblowers From U.S. Law Enforcement, Zena D. Crenshaw-Logal, Dr. Andrew D. Jackson, Dr. Sandra Nunn 2015 National Judicial Conduct and Disability Law Project, Inc.

How To Get Away With Career Murder: The Unconstitutional Blueprint For Systematically Purging Whistleblowers From U.S. Law Enforcement, Zena D. Crenshaw-Logal, Dr. Andrew D. Jackson, Dr. Sandra Nunn

Zena D. Crenshaw-Logal

Obviously U.S. state or federal prosecutors can be among the conspirators subjecting any given law enforcement whistleblower to retaliatory criminal prosecution.  In most instances such misdeeds are only under the color of law, i.e., they are the handy work of rogue government agents and do not constitute sovereign acts. However, according to the authors, an official or sovereign choice to “prefer” these oppressors is made each time a U.S. government agency opts not to thoroughly investigate their alleged whistleblower retaliation. The authors submit that all related convictions are accordingly void.  In addition to the “sworn public officer ...


The Federal Circuit As An Institution, Ryan G. Vacca 2015

The Federal Circuit As An Institution, Ryan G. Vacca

Ryan G. Vacca

The Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit is a unique institution. Unlike other circuit courts, the Federal Circuit’s jurisdiction is bound by subject area rather than geography, and it was created to address a unique set of problems specific to patent law. These characteristics have affected its institutional development and made the court one of the most frequently studied appellate courts. This chapter examines this development and describes the evolving qualities that have helped the Federal Circuit distinguish itself, for better or worse, as an institution.

This chapter begins with an overview of the concerns existing before creation ...


The New Governance: 2015 Pomerantz Lecture, Jill E. Fisch 2015 University of Pennsylvania Law School

The New Governance: 2015 Pomerantz Lecture, Jill E. Fisch

Faculty Scholarship

Corporate governance mechanisms designed to ensure that managers act in shareholders’ interest have evolved dramatically over the past forty years. “Old governance” mechanisms such as independent directors and performance-based executive compensation have been supplemented by innovations that give shareholders greater input into both the selection of directors and ongoing operational decisions. Issuer boards have responded with tools to limit the exercise of shareholder power both procedurally and substantively. This article terms the adoption and use of these tools, which generally take the form of structural provisions in the corporate charter or bylaws, the “new governance.”

Delaware law has largely taken ...


The Dmca Rulemaking Mechanism: Fail Or Safe?, Maryna Koberidze 2015 The George Washington University Law School

The Dmca Rulemaking Mechanism: Fail Or Safe?, Maryna Koberidze

Maryna Koberidze

This Article analyzes seventeen years under the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (“DMCA”) rulemaking mechanism and suggests changes to reinforce its successes while remedying its failures. Part I briefly discusses the legislative history of the rulemaking mechanism and policy justifications for its adoption within the DMCA scheme. Part II reviews legal and evidentiary standards of the rulemaking and recent changes to its administrative procedure. Part III provides an overview of the prior rulemakings and their impact on non-infringing uses, with a particular focus on the “e-book” and “cellphone unlocking” exemptions. Part IV applauds the Breaking Down Barriers to Innovation Act of ...


Admissibility Of Scientific Evidence Under Daubert: The Fatal Flaws Of ‘Falsifiability’ And ‘Falsification’, barbara p. billauer esq 2015 University of Haifa University Faculty of Law

Admissibility Of Scientific Evidence Under Daubert: The Fatal Flaws Of ‘Falsifiability’ And ‘Falsification’, Barbara P. Billauer Esq

barbara p billauer esq

Abstract:

The Daubert mantra demands that judges, acting as gatekeepers, prevent para, pseudo or ‘bad’ science from infiltrating the courtroom. To do so, the Judges must first determine what “science” is? And then, what ‘good science’ is?

It is submitted that Daubert is seriously polluted with the notions of Karl Popper who sets ‘falsifiability’ and ‘falsification’ as the demarcation line for that determination. This inapt philosophy has intractably infected case law, leading to bad decisions immortalized as stare decisis. Among other problems, is the intolerance of Popper’s system for multiple causation, a key component of toxic- torts. Thus, the ...


A Matter Of Trial And Error, Or Betting On Appeals, Radek Goral 2015 Notre Dame Law School

A Matter Of Trial And Error, Or Betting On Appeals, Radek Goral

Notre Dame Law Review Online

Sampling from the actual portfolio of a leading third-party litigation financier, this Essay demonstrates that making systematic bets on pending appeals is a viable business model applicable to a wide range of cases. “Appellate investments” may include both consumer and commercial cases, including also public-interest actions where prevailing plaintiffs are permitted attorney’s fees—even if they themselves do not seek monetary relief. Additionally, the analyzed sample indicates that appellate funders buy both from plaintiffs and plaintiffs’ attorneys, often in the same case.

The overview of the business strategy of appellate financing contributes to a larger theme: the role and ...


Joinder Of Unrelated Infringers As Defendants In Patent Litigation Under The Jurisprudence Of The United States District Court For Eastern District Of Texas—A Critical Review, Ping-Hsun Chen 2015 National Chengchi University

Joinder Of Unrelated Infringers As Defendants In Patent Litigation Under The Jurisprudence Of The United States District Court For Eastern District Of Texas—A Critical Review, Ping-Hsun Chen

Ping-Hsun Chen

On September 16, 2011, the American patent system started a new era because of the enactment of the Leahy-Smith America Invents Act (“AIA”). 35 U.S.C. § 299 was enacted to limit district court’s power to permit joinder of unrelated infringers as defendants in a single lawsuit. Before that, district courts apply Rule 20 of the Federal Civil Procedure. The Eastern District of Texas had permitted joinder only because the same patent was infringed. By introducing § 299, Congress intended to abrogate such approach. Later, the Federal Circuit in In re EMC limited the practice of Rule 20 and required ...


Joinder Of Unrelated Infringers As Defendants In Patent Litigation Under The Jurisprudence Of The United States District Court For Eastern District Of Texas—A Critical Review, Ping-Hsun Chen 2015 National Chengchi University

Joinder Of Unrelated Infringers As Defendants In Patent Litigation Under The Jurisprudence Of The United States District Court For Eastern District Of Texas—A Critical Review, Ping-Hsun Chen

Ping-Hsun Chen

On September 16, 2011, the American patent system started a new era because of the enactment of the Leahy-Smith America Invents Act (“AIA”). 35 U.S.C. § 299 was enacted to limit district court’s power to permit joinder of unrelated infringers as defendants in a single lawsuit. Before that, district courts apply Rule 20 of the Federal Civil Procedure. The Eastern District of Texas had permitted joinder only because the same patent was infringed. By introducing § 299, Congress intended to abrogate such approach. Later, the Federal Circuit in In re EMC limited the practice of Rule 20 and required ...


Litigation Trolls, W. Bradley Wendel 2015 Cornell Law School

Litigation Trolls, W. Bradley Wendel

Cornell Law Faculty Working Papers

Third-party financing of litigation has been described with a variety of unflattering metaphors. Litigation financers have been likened to gamblers in the courtroom casino, loan sharks, vultures, Wild West outlaws, and busybodies mucking about in the private affairs of others. Now Judge Richard Posner has referred to third-party financers as litigation trolls, an undeniably unflattering comparison to patent trolls. But what it is, if anything, that makes third-party financers “trolls”? Legal claims are, for the most part, freely assignable, the proceeds of claims are assignable, and various strangers to the underlying lawsuit, including liability insurers and plaintiffs’ contingency-fee counsel, are ...


Video: Prof. Sahani Presents At Nyu Center On Civil Justice 2015 Fall Conference On Litigation Funding, Victoria S Sahani 2015 Washington and Lee University School of Law

Video: Prof. Sahani Presents At Nyu Center On Civil Justice 2015 Fall Conference On Litigation Funding, Victoria S Sahani

Victoria Shannon Sahani

Litigation Funding: The Basics and Beyond

Third-party litigation funding is gaining a foothold in the United States. A global phenomenon, litigation funding has taken secure root in the United Kingdom, Australia and Hong Kong. It is, however, relatively new in the United States, and for many here the practice is wrapped in mystery. As a result, the Center on Civil Justice at NYU Law examined the impact it may have on our justice system and what, if any, regulation might be necessary. The center does this as part of its mission to engage scholars, practitioners, judges, and others in examination ...


Mental Health & The Law, D'Andre Devon Lampkin, D'Andre Devon Lampkin 2015 National University

Mental Health & The Law, D'Andre Devon Lampkin, D'Andre Devon Lampkin

D'Andre Devon Lampkin

The purpose of this research project is the introduce readers to the experiences of peace officers assigned to field teams that investigate incidents involving mental illness and the lessons learned throughout the evaluation process. This paper also endeavors to expose readers to how law enforcement agencies across the United States are addressing mental illness and improving response to incidents involving subjects with mental illnesses. Also included are highlights focused on training and the collaborations taking place between mental health professionals and law enforcement agencies wanting to combine judicial supervision with community based mental health treatment.


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