Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Fourteenth Amendment Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

1483 Full-Text Articles 1146 Authors 413110 Downloads 80 Institutions

All Articles in Fourteenth Amendment

Faceted Search

1483 full-text articles. Page 1 of 37.

Of Carrots And Sticks: General Jurisdiction And Genuine Consent, Craig Sanders 2017 Northwestern University Pritzker School of Law

Of Carrots And Sticks: General Jurisdiction And Genuine Consent, Craig Sanders

Northwestern University Law Review

The United States Supreme Court’s 2014 decision in Daimler AG v. Bauman changed how the courts will determine whether companies should be subject to general personal jurisdiction. In 1945, Pennoyer v. Neff’s geographical fixation gave way to International Shoe Co. v. Washington, which provided a test for courts to determine whether corporations had sufficient contact with a forum to meet the bar for personal jurisdiction there. Specific jurisdiction requires “minimum contacts,” provided the action is satisfactorily related to the forum. However, to be subject to general jurisdiction, a corporation must possess more than just “minimum contacts,” and claimants ...


Dissenting From History: The False Narratives Of The Obergefell Dissents, Christopher R. Leslie 2017 University of California - Irvine

Dissenting From History: The False Narratives Of The Obergefell Dissents, Christopher R. Leslie

Indiana Law Journal

According to a quote attributed to numerous philosophers and political leaders, “History is written by victors.”1 In the legal battle over same-sex marriage, those opposed to marriage equality have attempted to disprove this age-old adage. In response to the majority opinion in Obergefell v. Hodges—which held that state laws banning same-sex marriage violate the Fourteenth Amendment—each of the four dissenting Justices issued his own dissenting opinion. Every one of these dissents misrepresented the circumstances and precedent leading up to the Obergefell decision. Collectively, the Obergefell dissenters have valiantly tried to rewrite America’s legal, constitutional, and social ...


Federal Habeas Review Of State Court Convictions: Incoherent Law But An Essential Right, Lynn Adelman 2017 University of Maine School of Law

Federal Habeas Review Of State Court Convictions: Incoherent Law But An Essential Right, Lynn Adelman

Maine Law Review

I thank the editors of the Maine Law Review for the opportunity to participate in a discussion about the present state of post-conviction review of criminal convictions. This discussion is important and timely both because the quality of the procedures by which state prisoners can obtain post-conviction review varies greatly from state to state and because state prisoners who seek federal court review of their constitutional claims by petitioning for a writ of habeas corpus face many obstacles. As a federal district judge, my experience is primarily with the later problem. Thus, in this article, I will offer a few ...


Pushing The Limits: Reining In Ohio's Residency Restrictions For Sex Offenders, Taurean J. Shattuck 2017 Cleveland-Marshall College of Law

Pushing The Limits: Reining In Ohio's Residency Restrictions For Sex Offenders, Taurean J. Shattuck

Cleveland State Law Review

The danger to children posed by convicted sex offenders living near schools, parks, and bus stops has been greatly exaggerated by the media. In turn, many state legislatures have attempted to find solutions to this perceived problem, imposing sanctions that seem to keep the "problem" at bay. A relatively new approach prevents those convicted of sex crimes from living within a certain distance of places where children congregate. Ohio is one of the states that has adopted this approach. The problem with this approach, however, is that imposing such restrictions on all individuals convicted of certain crimes imposes barriers to ...


Undue Process: A Father's Proprietary Interest In An Embryo And Its Clash With Casey, Anthony Jose Sirven 2017 University of Florida Levin College of Law

Undue Process: A Father's Proprietary Interest In An Embryo And Its Clash With Casey, Anthony Jose Sirven

Florida Law Review

In Planned Parenthood of Missouri v. Danforth and Planned Parenthood of Southeastern Pennsylvania v. Casey, the United States Supreme Court respectively held that it is unconstitutional to require a mother to seek consent from or to notify the father before she has an abortion. Fathers thus lost consent and notification rights. However, courts have recently begun to recognize a property interest in human embryos. This legal trend—resulting from the widespread use of assisted reproductive technology—could allow fathers to claim that the abortion of their unborn children violates the Due Process Clause, which protects people from being deprived of ...


Voting Rights And The History Of Institutionalized Racism: Criminal Disenfranchisement In The United States And South Africa, Brock A. Johnson 2017 University of Georgia School of Law

Voting Rights And The History Of Institutionalized Racism: Criminal Disenfranchisement In The United States And South Africa, Brock A. Johnson

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


The Boundaries Of Partisan Gerrymandering, John M. Greabe 2017 University of New Hampshire School of Law

The Boundaries Of Partisan Gerrymandering, John M. Greabe

Legal Scholarship

[Excerpt] “In my most recent column, I expressed concern about the effectiveness of the constitutional decision rules that currently govern gerrymandering – the redrawing of electoral districts in a manner that favors the incumbent majority at the expense of those out of power.

Briefly, the Constitution has not been interpreted to prohibit redistricting with an eye toward advancing the interests of the political party in power. But it has been interpreted to bar legislators from redistricting on racial grounds – at least in most circumstances.

The problem is that voters from certain racial groups tend to vote overwhelmingly for a single party ...


Reflection: How Multiracial Lives Matter 50 Years After Loving, Lauren Sudeall Lucas 2017 Georgia State University College of Law

Reflection: How Multiracial Lives Matter 50 Years After Loving, Lauren Sudeall Lucas

Lauren Sudeall Lucas

Black Lives Matter. All Lives Matter. These two statements are both true, but connote very different sentiments in our current political reality. To further complicate matters, in this short reflection piece, I query how multiracial lives matter in the context of this heated social and political discussion about race. As a multiracial person committed to racial justice and sympathetic both to those pushing for recognition of multiracial identity and to those who worry such recognition may undermine larger movements, these are questions I have long grappled with both professionally and personally. Of course, multiracial lives matter - but do they constitute ...


Race, Partisan Gerrymandering And The Constitution, John M. Greabe 2017 University of New Hampshire School of Law

Race, Partisan Gerrymandering And The Constitution, John M. Greabe

Legal Scholarship

[Excerpt] “For the most part, the Constitution speaks in generalities. The 14th Amendment, for example, instructs the states to provide all persons the "equal protection of the laws." But obviously, this cannot mean that states are always forbidden from treating a person differently than any other person. Children can, of course, be constitutionally barred from driving, notwithstanding the Equal Protection Clause. Thus, there is a need within our constitutional system to refine the Constitution's abstract provisions.”


The Legacy Of Slavery And The Continued Marginalization Of Communities Of Color Within The Legal System, Julia N. Alvarez 2017 The Graduate Center, City University of New York

The Legacy Of Slavery And The Continued Marginalization Of Communities Of Color Within The Legal System, Julia N. Alvarez

All Graduate Works by Year: Dissertations, Theses, and Capstone Projects

The aim of this thesis paper is to demonstrate how the history of slavery in the United States continues to marginalize communities of color. The history of slavery in America was the result of various factors. Some of these factors included but were not limited to; economic, legal, and social. Slavery provided a reliable and self-reproducing workforce. The laws enacted during slavery ensured the continuation of the social order of the time. This social order was based on the generalized understanding that blacks were born into servitude. Those born into slavery were not given the same legal or economic status ...


The State-Created Danger Doctrine, Erwin Chemerinsky 2017 Selected Works

The State-Created Danger Doctrine, Erwin Chemerinsky

Erwin Chemerinsky

No abstract provided.


Qualified Immunity: 1983 Litigation In The Public Employment Context, Erwin Chemerinsky 2017 Selected Works

Qualified Immunity: 1983 Litigation In The Public Employment Context, Erwin Chemerinsky

Erwin Chemerinsky

No abstract provided.


Look Back At The Rehnquist Era And An Overview Of The 2004 Supreme Court Term, Erwin Chemerinsky 2017 Touro Law School

Look Back At The Rehnquist Era And An Overview Of The 2004 Supreme Court Term, Erwin Chemerinsky

Erwin Chemerinsky

No abstract provided.


A Post-Race Equal Protection?, Trina Jones, Mario L. Barnes, Erwin Chemerinsky 2017 Duke Law School

A Post-Race Equal Protection?, Trina Jones, Mario L. Barnes, Erwin Chemerinsky

Erwin Chemerinsky

Most vividly demonstrated in the 2008 election of the first African-American President of the United States, post-race is a term that has been widely used to characterize a belief in the declining significance of race in the United States. Post-racialists, then, believe that racial discrimination is rare and aberrant behavior as evidenced by America’s pronounced racial progress. One practical consequence of a commitment to post-racialism is the belief that governments - both state and federal - should not consider race in their decision making. One might imagine that the recent explosion in post-racial discourse also portends a revised understanding of equality ...


Washington V. Glucksberg Was Tragically Wrong, Erwin Chemerinsky 2017 Duke University

Washington V. Glucksberg Was Tragically Wrong, Erwin Chemerinsky

Erwin Chemerinsky

Properly focused, there were two questions before the Supreme Court in Washington v. Glucksberg. First, in light of all of the other non-textual rights protected by the Supreme Court under the "liberty" of the Due Process Clause, is the right to assisted death a fundamental right? Second, if so, is the prohibition of assisted death necessary to achieve a compelling interest? Presented in this way, it is clear that the Court erred in Washington v. Glucksberg. The right of a terminally ill person to end his or her life is an essential aspect of autonomy, comparable to aspects of autonomy ...


A Chill Wind Blows: Undue Burden In The Wake Of Whole Woman’S Health V. Hellerstedt, Catherine Gamper 2017 University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law

A Chill Wind Blows: Undue Burden In The Wake Of Whole Woman’S Health V. Hellerstedt, Catherine Gamper

Maryland Law Review

No abstract provided.


Punitive Damages Revisited: A Statistical Analysis Of How Federal Circuit Courts Decide The Constitutionality Of Such Awards, Hironari Momioka 2017 Hokkaido University of Education

Punitive Damages Revisited: A Statistical Analysis Of How Federal Circuit Courts Decide The Constitutionality Of Such Awards, Hironari Momioka

Cleveland State Law Review

Using data from punitive damages decisions of U.S. federal circuit courts from 2004 to 2012, this paper attempts to establish empirically the following: (1) there is no apparent statistical difference between the levels of jury and judge awards; (2) U.S. Supreme Court decisions such as Philip Morris (2007) or Exxon (2008) do not actually or substantially affect the level of punitive damage awards; (3) with regard to the cases involving remittitur, or reduction of awards, the Exxon decision did not radically affect the decreasing ratio of punitive to compensatory damage awards; (4) as the levels of compensatory awards ...


Reflection: How Multiracial Lives Matter 50 Years After Loving, Lauren Sudeall Lucas 2017 Georgia State University College of Law

Reflection: How Multiracial Lives Matter 50 Years After Loving, Lauren Sudeall Lucas

Faculty Publications By Year

Black Lives Matter. All Lives Matter. These two statements are both true, but connote very different sentiments in our current political reality. To further complicate matters, in this short reflection piece, I query how multiracial lives matter in the context of this heated social and political discussion about race. As a multiracial person committed to racial justice and sympathetic both to those pushing for recognition of multiracial identity and to those who worry such recognition may undermine larger movements, these are questions I have long grappled with both professionally and personally. Of course, multiracial lives matter - but do they constitute ...


Occupational Licensing: Quality Control Or Enterprise Killer? Problems That Arise When People Must Get The Government's Permission To Work, W. Sherman Rogers 2017 Pepperdine University

Occupational Licensing: Quality Control Or Enterprise Killer? Problems That Arise When People Must Get The Government's Permission To Work, W. Sherman Rogers

The Journal of Business, Entrepreneurship & the Law

This Article is organized into six parts: Part one (the current section) provides the reader with an introduction and overview of the issues that have arisen because of states’ ever-expanding regulation of occupations requiring qualifications and credentials for holding certain jobs. Such qualifications often appear totally unnecessary to one’s ability to safely and competently perform a job. Part two provides background information on the Lochner Era of Supreme Court jurisprudence, the aftermath of the Lochner Era, and a brief history of the issues involved in state occupational licensing requirements. Part three discusses and evaluates recent cases of note—primarily ...


A Promise Unfulfilled: Challenges To Georgia’S Death Penalty Statute Post-Furman, William Cody Newsome 2017 Georgia State University College of Law

A Promise Unfulfilled: Challenges To Georgia’S Death Penalty Statute Post-Furman, William Cody Newsome

Georgia State University Law Review

In Furman v. Georgia, the U.S. Supreme Court agreed with Furman’s counsel. Three Justices agreed that Georgia law, as applied, was arbitrary and potentially discriminatory. Moreover, one Justice challenged the value of the death penalty and doubted it served any of the alleged purposes for which it was employed.

Although many challenges subsequent to Furman have been raised and arguably resolved by the Court, the underlying challenges raised by Furman appear to remain prevalent with the Court. Justice Breyer recently echoed the concurring opinions of Furman in his dissenting opinion from Glossip v. Gross, when he stated: “In ...


Digital Commons powered by bepress