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Conscience And Complicity: Assessing Pleas For Religious Exemptions In Hobby Lobby's Wake, Amy Sepinwall 2015 University of Pennsylvania

Conscience And Complicity: Assessing Pleas For Religious Exemptions In Hobby Lobby's Wake, Amy Sepinwall

Amy J. Sepinwall

In the paradigmatic case of conscientious objection, the objector claims that his religion forbids him from actively participating in a wrong (e.g., by fighting in a war). In the religious challenges to the Affordable Care Act’s employer mandate, on the other hand, employers claim that their religious convictions forbid them from merely subsidizing insurance through which their employees might commit a wrong (e.g., by using contraception). The understanding of complicity underpinning these challenges is vastly more expansive than what standard legal doctrine or moral theory contemplates. Courts routinely reject claims of conscientious objection to taxes that fund ...


Gambling On Our Financial Future: How The Federal Government Fiddles While State Common Law Is A Safer Bet To Prevent Another Financial Collapse, Brian M. McCall 2015 University of Oklahoma College of Law

Gambling On Our Financial Future: How The Federal Government Fiddles While State Common Law Is A Safer Bet To Prevent Another Financial Collapse, Brian M. Mccall

Brian M McCall

Many politicians and commentators agree that credit default swaps (CDS) played a significant role in the financial crisis of 2008. Yet, few who observe this role are aware that CDS were set loose on the economy by the federal pre-emption of thousands of years of public policy. Since the time of Aristotle law, philosophy and public policy have been hostile to gambling. Viewed as a socially unproductive zero sum wealth transfer, the law has generally refused to permit parties to use the courts to enforce wagers. Courts and legislatures worked in harmony to control and in some cases punish financial ...


Cocktails On Campus: Are Libations A Liability?, Susan S. Bendlin 2015 SelectedWorks

Cocktails On Campus: Are Libations A Liability?, Susan S. Bendlin

Susan S. Bendlin

ABSTRACT: By Susan S. Bendlin

An estimated 1,825 college students die each year from alcohol-related, unintentional injuries. Roughly 599,000 students between the ages of 18 and 24 are injured every year while under the influence of alcohol. Tales of intoxicated college students’ wild, disgusting, and often violent behavior have made the national news. Litigation over alcohol-related incidents on college campuses arises from various situations, including injuries that result from intoxicated students falling, injuries suffered during parties and hazing rituals involving alcohol, and injuries from other assaults that occur after alcohol has been consumed on campus.

At the outset ...


Structural Reform Litigation In American Police Departments, Stephen Rushin 2015 University of Illinois College of Law

Structural Reform Litigation In American Police Departments, Stephen Rushin

Stephen Rushin

In 1994, Congress passed 42 U.S.C. §14141, a statute authorizing the Attorney General to seek equitable relief against local and state police agencies that are engaged in a pattern or practice of unconstitutional misconduct. Although police departments in some of the nation’s largest cities have now undergone this sort of structural reform litigation, there has been little empirical research on the topic. Drawing on original interviews, court documents, statistical data, and media reports, this Article describes the federal government’s use of structural reform litigation in American police departments and theorizes on its effectiveness. It argues that ...


Free Expression, In-Group Bias, And The Court's Conservatives: A Critique Of The Epstein-Parker-Segal Study, Todd E. Pettys 2015 University of Iowa

Free Expression, In-Group Bias, And The Court's Conservatives: A Critique Of The Epstein-Parker-Segal Study, Todd E. Pettys

Todd E. Pettys

In a recent, widely publicized study, a prestigious team of political scientists concluded that there is strong evidence of ideological in-group bias among the Supreme Court’s members in First Amendment free-expression cases, with the current four most conservative justices being the Roberts Court’s worst offenders. Beneath the surface of the authors’ conclusions, however, one finds a surprisingly sizable combination of coding errors, superficial case readings, and questionable judgments about litigants’ ideological affiliations. Many of those problems likely flow either from shortcomings that reportedly afflict the Supreme Court Database (the data set that nearly always provides the starting point ...


A Different Kind Of Justice: Review 2, Claudia Taranto 2014 University of Wollongong

A Different Kind Of Justice: Review 2, Claudia Taranto

RadioDoc Review

A Different Kind of Justice tells the story of two people who met across a table in a restorative justice (RJ) conference, facilitated by Karl James, an RJ professional. Margaret’s home is robbed; Ian, a burglar and heroin addict, took a few small items, including a laptop with all her family photos. Margaret reveals that her daughter Jessica died in a car accident a few months after the burglary and the missing photos now mean so much more to the family.

The program is essentially interviews with the two characters, intercut, as they each tell their version of their ...


Passing The Torch But Sailing Too Close To The Wind: Congress’S Role In Authorizing Administrative Branches To Promulgate Regulations That Contemplate Criminal Sanctions, Reem Sadik 2014 American University Washington College of Law

Passing The Torch But Sailing Too Close To The Wind: Congress’S Role In Authorizing Administrative Branches To Promulgate Regulations That Contemplate Criminal Sanctions, Reem Sadik

Legislation and Policy Brief

The Supreme Court has stated that Congress must simply “lay down by legislative act an intelligible principle” to which the agency must conform. If this is done, a court will find the delegation of broad authority to the agency to be constitutional. There is, however, an open issue regarding whether the “intelligible principle” standard applies to delegations of authority that allow for the promulgation of both civil and criminal penalties. In Touby v. United States, the Supreme Court was asked whether “something more than an ‘intelligible principle’ is required” when Congress authorizes an agency to issue regulations that contemplate criminal ...


Moral Panics And Body Cameras, Howard M. Wasserman 2014 Washington University in St. Louis

Moral Panics And Body Cameras, Howard M. Wasserman

Washington University Law Review Commentaries

This Commentary uses the lens of "moral panics" to evaluate public support for equipping law enforcement with body cameras as a response and solution to events in Ferguson, Missouri in August 2014. Body cameras are a generally good policy idea. But the rhetoric surrounding them erroneously treats them as the single guaranteed solution to the problem of excessive force and police-citizen conflicts, particularly by ignoring the limitations of video evidence and the difficult questions of implementing any body camera program. In overstating the case, the rhetoric of body cameras becomes indistinguishable from rhetoric surrounding responses to past moral panics.


A Different Kind Of Justice: Review 1, Cassandra Sharp Dr 2014 University of Wollongong

A Different Kind Of Justice: Review 1, Cassandra Sharp Dr

RadioDoc Review

Despite the accepted success of many restorative justice programs with youth and Indigenous offenders, debate still proliferates about the utility of adult restorative justice programs within the criminal justice system. Many important questions are raised about the efficacy and impact of such programs including: ‘What can restorative justice offer adult offenders and victims of crime? What are some of the challenges of using restorative justice in this context? And what can we learn from emerging developments in practice?’ (Bolitho et al, 2012). As will be discussed in this review, Russell Finch’s BBC Radio 4 production of A Different Kind ...


More Burden Than Benefit? Analysis Of The Benefit Corporation Movement In California, Sarah Thornsberry 2014 Pepperdine University

More Burden Than Benefit? Analysis Of The Benefit Corporation Movement In California, Sarah Thornsberry

The Journal of Business, Entrepreneurship & the Law

The benefit corporation movement has been associated with the separate camps of social entrepreneurship, nonprofit organizations, and for-profit corporations, while trying to establish itself as a community of businesses that pursue not only profit, but also environmental and social good. This article examines the legal attributes of benefit corporation legislation and articulates why incorporating as a benefit corporation can be an excellent business decision. Lastly, the article looks at how the movement can further expand in California.


The Rise And Fall And Resurrection Of American Criminal Codes, Paul H. Robinson 2014 University of Pennsylvania Law School

The Rise And Fall And Resurrection Of American Criminal Codes, Paul H. Robinson

Faculty Scholarship

This brief essay summarizes the virtues of the modern American codification movement of the 1960s and 70s, putting it in a larger global context, then describes how these once-enviable codes have been systematically degraded with thoughtless amendments, a process of degradation that is accelerating each year. After exploring the political dynamics that promote such degradation, the essay suggests the principles and procedures for fixing the current codes and, more importantly, structural changes to the process that could avoid the restart of degradation in the future.


Making The Modern Family: Interracial Intimacy And The Social Production Of Whiteness, Camille Gear Rich 2014 BLR

Making The Modern Family: Interracial Intimacy And The Social Production Of Whiteness, Camille Gear Rich

University of Southern California Legal Studies Working Paper Series

This Book Review uses Angela Onwuachi-Willig's Book, According to Our Hearts, Rhinelander v. Rhinelander and the Law of the Multiracial Family as an opportunity to explore the multiracial family's role in American society. The discussion unpacks the discussion of "interracially" explored in her book by precisely outlining the various discrimination modalities covered by her discussion of interraciality-based discrimination. The review reveals that Onwuachi-Willig explores six different types of discrimination, some of which require engagement with cutting-edge disputes in antidiscrimination theory and law. The Review teases out these various discrimination constructs and asks in a more deliberate fashion how ...


Elective Race: Recognizing Race Discrimination In The Era Of Racial Self-Identification, Camille Gear Rich 2014 BLR

Elective Race: Recognizing Race Discrimination In The Era Of Racial Self-Identification, Camille Gear Rich

University of Southern California Legal Studies Working Paper Series

This Article posits that we are in a key moment of discursive and ideological transition, an era in which the model of elective race is ascending, poised to become one of the dominant frameworks for understanding race in the United States. Because we are in a period of transition, many Americans still are wedded to fairly traditional attitudes about race. For these Americans, race is still an objective, easily ascertainable fact determined by the process of involuntary racial ascription — how one’s physical traits are racially categorized by third parties. The elective-race framework will challenge these Americans to recognize other ...


Is Ip Law Modernization Possible? Assessing Approaches In Acta, Sopa, And Bill C-11, Lauren Gray Farrar 2014 University of Georgia School of Law

Is Ip Law Modernization Possible? Assessing Approaches In Acta, Sopa, And Bill C-11, Lauren Gray Farrar

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


Police, State Security Forces And Constitutionalism Of Human Rights In Zambia, Charles Mwalimu 2014 University of Georgia School of Law

Police, State Security Forces And Constitutionalism Of Human Rights In Zambia, Charles Mwalimu

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


German Reunification - The Privatization Of Socialist Property On East Germany's Path To Democracy, Michael J. Thomerson 2014 University of Georgia School of Law

German Reunification - The Privatization Of Socialist Property On East Germany's Path To Democracy, Michael J. Thomerson

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


Reinventing Copyright And Patent, Abraham Bell, Gideon Parchomovsky 2014 University of Michigan Law School

Reinventing Copyright And Patent, Abraham Bell, Gideon Parchomovsky

Michigan Law Review

Intellectual property systems all over the world are modeled on a one-size-fitsall principle. However important or unimportant, inventions and original works receive the same scope of protection, for the same period of time, backed by the same variety of legal remedies. Essentially, all intellectual property is equal under the law. This equality comes at a heavy price, however. The equality principle gives all creators access to the same remedies, even when those remedies create perverse litigation incentives. Moreover, society overpays for innovation through more monopoly losses than are strictly necessary to incentivize production. In this Article, we propose a solution ...


Speedy Trial As A Viable Challenge To Chronic Underfunding In Indigent-Defense Systems, Emily Rose 2014 University of Michigan Law School

Speedy Trial As A Viable Challenge To Chronic Underfunding In Indigent-Defense Systems, Emily Rose

Michigan Law Review

Across the country, underresourced indigent-defense systems create delays in taking cases to trial at both the state and federal levels. Attempts to increase funding for indigent defense by bringing ineffective assistance of counsel claims have been thwarted by high procedural and substantive hurdles, and consequently these attempts have failed to bring significant change. This Note argues that, because ineffective assistance of counsel litigation is most likely a dead end for system-wide reform, indigent defenders should challenge the constitutionality of underfunding based on the Sixth Amendment guarantee of speedy trial. Existing speedy trial jurisprudence suggests that the overworking and furloughing of ...


Chevron Inside The Regulatory State: An Empirical Assessment, Christopher J. Walker 2014 SelectedWorks

Chevron Inside The Regulatory State: An Empirical Assessment, Christopher J. Walker

Christopher J. Walker

For three decades, scholars (as well as courts and litigants) have written thousands of articles (and opinions and briefs) concerning the impact of the Chevron deference regime on judicial review of agency statutory interpretation. Little attention, however, has been paid to how Chevron and its progeny have actually shaped statutory interpretation inside the regulatory state. As part of the Fordham Law Review symposium Chevron at 30: Looking Back and Looking Forward, this Essay presents the findings of the first comprehensive empirical investigation into the effect of Chevron and related doctrines on how federal agencies interpret statutes they administer.

The Essay ...


Piketty In America: A Tale Of Two Literatures, Joseph Bankman, Daniel Shaviro 2014 NELLCO

Piketty In America: A Tale Of Two Literatures, Joseph Bankman, Daniel Shaviro

New York University Law and Economics Working Papers

Thomas Piketty’s widely-noted and bestselling book, Capital in the Twenty-First Century, does much to advance our empirical understanding of rising high-end wealth concentration, which is one of the central issues of our time. But its theoretical approach and policy recommendations differ sharply from those that have been prevalent in recent decades in the Anglo-American academic tax policy literature. We adjudicate this “confrontation” (insofar as it is one), and find that each approach in some respects both undermines and enriches the other. We find that the optimal tax response to wealth concentration is significantly more complicated than Piketty’s analysis ...


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