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Justices As Sacred Symbols: Antonin Scalia And The Cultural Life Of The Law, Brian Christopher Jones, Austin Sarat 2016 Liverpool Hope University, UK

Justices As Sacred Symbols: Antonin Scalia And The Cultural Life Of The Law, Brian Christopher Jones, Austin Sarat

Brian Christopher Jones

The idea of the brilliant and elegant philosopher judge has a long and romanticized history. From Sir Edward Coke, William Blackstone and Joseph Story to Oliver Wendell Holmes, Louis Brandeis and Lord Bingham, the common law is replete with this vision of judging. In this vision, judges sometimes seem to be law makers as much as faithful it interpreters. In many ways Antonin Scalia fought against this traditional vision of the philosopher judge. He disliked activist judges who imposed their idea of wisdom on elected legislatures; in fact, he trumpeted his jurisprudence for its fidelity to law and deference to ...


Rethinking Counterterrorism In The Age Of Isis, Sahar F. Aziz 2016 Texas A&M University School of Law

Rethinking Counterterrorism In The Age Of Isis, Sahar F. Aziz

Sahar F. Aziz

Failing states are havens for terrorism. A toxic combination of social, economic, and political crises attract violent extremist groups to establish bases in these lawless areas. As the groups grow in strength, the violence spreads from the immediate vicinity to the nation, region, and sometimes even other continents. One need only look to the terrorist attacks in New York, London, Madrid, and Paris as proof that terrorists operating out of failing states eventually set their sights on attacking Western capitals. Although the underlying causes of terrorism are often local, the violence is no longer constrained within a particular country or ...


The Rise Of The Global South, The Imf And The Future Of Law And Development, Gabriel Garcia 2016 University of Wollongong

The Rise Of The Global South, The Imf And The Future Of Law And Development, Gabriel Garcia

Dr Gabriel Garcia

After the onset of the Asian Financial Crisis, the world has witnessed a re-accommodation of the global financial system. In the particular case of middle-income countries, they have disentangled themselves from the conditionality of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and grown into more assertive actors in international forums, proposing new alternative mechanisms to become more financially independent and for the provision of development assistance. The article critically reviews the new reality by assessing the strategies deployed by developing countries to reduce the IMF’s influence and explores the potential consequences of the rise of middle-income nations for Law and Development.


Must The Hand Formula Not Be Named?, Gregory C. Keating 2016 University of Southern California

Must The Hand Formula Not Be Named?, Gregory C. Keating

University of Southern California Legal Studies Working Paper Series

This paper responds to Benjamin Zipursky’s Reasonableness in and out of Negligence Law 163 U. PA. L. REV. 2131 (2015). It takes issue with Professor Zipursky’s aversion to the Hand Formula. Trying to write the Hand Formula out of negligence law at this late date is tantamount to repudiating one hundred years of tort law and theory. This revisionary theorizing is as unnecessary as it is quixotic. The Hand Formula is not only too deeply embedded in negligence law to uproot; it is also unobjectionable. Indeed, the Hand Formula is one of modern negligence law’s more important ...


Products Liability As Enterprise Liability, Gregory C. Keating 2016 University of Southern California

Products Liability As Enterprise Liability, Gregory C. Keating

University of Southern California Legal Studies Working Paper Series

The prevailing wisdom about the rise of modern products liability law is framed by a debate which took place more than a generation ago. George Priest argued that modern American products liability law was born as enterprise liability incarnate and consequently ran amok in a nightmare of unlimited liability. Gary Schwartz countered that product liability law strict in name but fault-based in fact. Strict products liability was a revolution in rhetoric alone. To this day, these positions dominate our understanding of products liability law in its formative moment. We are long overdue for a fresh look. This paper argues that ...


Is Cost-Benefit Analysis The Only Game In Town?, Gregory C. Keating 2016 University of Southern California

Is Cost-Benefit Analysis The Only Game In Town?, Gregory C. Keating

University of Southern California Legal Studies Working Paper Series

Standards which prescribe more than efficient precaution against physical harm and health injury are commonplace in American environmental, health and safety regulation. The safe level standard, for example, requires the elimination of all significant risks. The feasibility standard requires the elimination of significant risks to the extent insofar as it is possible to do so without impairing the long run survival of the activities which give rise to the risks. These standards reach back more than a generation to the founding of the EPA and OSHA. You might think that they are too well-entrenched in American law to be subject ...


Comment On Avraham And Yuracko: Torts And The Paradox Of Conservative Justice, Gregory C. Keating 2016 University of Southern California

Comment On Avraham And Yuracko: Torts And The Paradox Of Conservative Justice, Gregory C. Keating

University of Southern California Legal Studies Working Paper Series

This paper comments on Ronen Avraham & Kim Yuracko, Torts and Discrimination forthcoming in the Ohio State Law Journal. Professors Avraham and Yuracko’s fine article, Torts and Discrimination, calls our attention to the fact that the entrenched fact of race and gender discrimination exerts a powerful, structural influence on tort damages, especially in bodily injury and wrongful death cases. Damages in tort—and in private law more generally—are reparative. Their role is to put the plaintiff in the position he would have been in but for the defendant’s wrong. Making the plaintiff whole requires that courts determine how ...


Liability Without Regard To Fault: A Comment On Goldberg & Zipursky, Gregory C. Keating 2016 University of Southern California

Liability Without Regard To Fault: A Comment On Goldberg & Zipursky, Gregory C. Keating

University of Southern California Legal Studies Working Paper Series

This paper comments on John C.P. Goldberg & Benjamin C. Zipursky, The Strict Liability in Fault and the Fault in Strict Liability 85 Fordham L.Rev. 743 (2016). In their important writings over the past twenty years, Professors Goldberg and Zipursky have argued that torts are conduct-based wrongs. A conduct-based wrong is one where an agent violates the right of another by failing to conform her conduct to the standard required by the law. Strict liability in tort poses a formidable challenge to the claim that all torts are wrongs whose distinctive feature is that they violate an applicable standard ...


Tragedy, Outrage & Reform Crimes That Changed Our World: 1911 – Triangle Factory Fire – Building Safety Codes, Paul H. Robinson, Sarah M. Robinson 2016 University of Pennsylvania Law School

Tragedy, Outrage & Reform Crimes That Changed Our World: 1911 – Triangle Factory Fire – Building Safety Codes, Paul H. Robinson, Sarah M. Robinson

Faculty Scholarship

Can a crime make our world better? Crimes are the worst of humanity’s wrongs but, oddly, they sometimes do more than anything else to improve our lives. As it turns out, it is often the outrageousness itself that does the work. Ordinary crimes are accepted as the background noise of our everyday existence but some crimes make people stop and take notice – because they are so outrageous, or so curious, or so heart-wrenching. These “trigger crimes” are the cases that this book is about.

They offer some incredible stories about how people, good and bad, change the world around ...


Corporate Privacy Failures Start At The Top, Victoria L. Schwartz 2016 Pepperdine University School of Law

Corporate Privacy Failures Start At The Top, Victoria L. Schwartz

Boston College Law Review

With the rise of big data, numerous corporations are in the privacy business. Yet even corporations not directly in the privacy business must also make important decisions potentially impacting the privacy of their employees, consumers, and shareholders. A wide consensus of scholars and commentators has agreed that corporations fail to adequately protect privacy. The existing scholarship has largely focused on demand-side market failures to explain this privacy failure phenomenon. This Article offers a supply-side market distortion theory that reinforces the existing demand-side explanations to better account for corporate privacy failures. Under this supply-side theory, extensive corporate disclosure requirements, including the ...


Lawyers And Biblical Prophets, Thomas L. Shaffer 2016 Notre Dame Law School

Lawyers And Biblical Prophets, Thomas L. Shaffer

Thomas L. Shaffer

This is part of a broader exploration of the suggestion that the biblical prophets-Moses, Isaiah, Jeremiah, Amos, Nathan, and the others-are sources of ethical reflection and moral example for modern American lawyers. The suggestion appears to be unusual; I am not sure why. The Prophets were, more than anything else, lawyers-as their successors, the Rabbis of the Talmud, were. They were neither teachers nor bureaucrats, not elected officials or priests or preachers. And the comparison is not an ancient curiosity: Much of what admirable lawyer-heroes have done in modern America has been prophetic in the biblical sense-that is, what they ...


Is Government Really Broken?, Cary Coglianese 2016 University of Pennsylvania Law School

Is Government Really Broken?, Cary Coglianese

Faculty Scholarship

The widespread public angst that surfaced in the 2016 presidential election revealed how many Americans believe their government has become badly broken. Given the serious problems that continue to persist in society—crime, illiteracy, unemployment, poverty, discrimination, to name a few—widespread beliefs in a governmental breakdown are understandable. Yet such a breakdown is actually far from self-evident. In this paper, I explain how diagnoses of governmental performance depend on the perspective from which current conditions in the country are viewed. Certainly when judged against a standard of perfection, America has a long way to go. But perfection is no ...


Front Matter For: Poverty Law, Policy, And Practice, Juliet Brodie, Clare Pastore, Ezra Rosser, Jeffrey Selbin 2016 Stanford Law School

Front Matter For: Poverty Law, Policy, And Practice, Juliet Brodie, Clare Pastore, Ezra Rosser, Jeffrey Selbin

Ezra Rosser

This paper is the front matter for the publication "Poverty Law, Policy, and Practice" published by Wolters Kluwer, 2014.


Legal Paternalism And The Eclipse Of Principle, R. George Wright 2016 University of Miami Law School

Legal Paternalism And The Eclipse Of Principle, R. George Wright

University of Miami Law Review

Legal paternalism involves, very roughly, requiring persons to do something for their own good. We often think of debates between legal paternalists and non-paternalists as taking place largely at the level of broad, basic principle. This Article argues, however, that in our culture, disputes over the proper scope of legal paternalism will increasingly focus not on issues of basic principle, but on much more detailed, concrete, particular, contextualized matters. The four major reasons for this eclipse of basic principles bearing upon legal paternalism are herein identified, explored, and illustrated.


No Quick Fix: The Failure Of Criminal Law And The Promise Of Civil Law Remedies For Domestic Child Sex Trafficking, Charisa Smith 2016 University of Miami Law School

No Quick Fix: The Failure Of Criminal Law And The Promise Of Civil Law Remedies For Domestic Child Sex Trafficking, Charisa Smith

University of Miami Law Review

Pimps and johns who sexually exploit children garner instant public and scholarly outrage for their lust for a destructive “quick fix.” In actuality, many justifiably concerned scholars, policymakers, and members of the public continue to react over-simplistically and reflexively to the issue of child sex trafficking in the United States—also known as commercial sexual exploitation of children (CSEC)—in a manner intellectually akin to immediate gratification. Further, research reveals that the average john is an employed, married male of any given race or ethnicity, suggesting that over-simplification and knee-jerk thinking on CSEC are conspicuous. This Article raises provocative questions ...


Left Behind: The Dying Principle Of Family Reunification Under Immigration Law, Anita Ortiz Maddali 2016 Northern Illinois University College of Law

Left Behind: The Dying Principle Of Family Reunification Under Immigration Law, Anita Ortiz Maddali

University of Michigan Journal of Law Reform

A key underpinning of modern U.S. immigration law is family reunification, but in practice it can privilege certain families and certain members within families. Drawing on legislative history, this Article examines the origins and objectives of the principle of family reunification in immigration law and relies on legal scholarship and sociological and anthropological research to reveal how contemporary immigration law and policy has diluted the principle for many families—particularly those who do not fit the dominant nuclear family model, those classified as unskilled, and families from oversubscribed countries—and members within families. It explores the ways in which ...


Book Review, Lisa M. White 2016 University of New Hampshire

Book Review, Lisa M. White

RISK: Health, Safety & Environment

Review of: STUART M. SPEISER, LAWYERS AND THE AMERICAN DREAM. (Evans 1993) [430 pp.] Endnotes with full citations, index, and lexicon (lay definitions of legal terms). LC 93-35272; ISBN 0-87131-724-9. [$16.95 paper. 216 E. 49th Street, New York NY 10017.]


Copyrights From A Child's Perspective, Monica Vining 2016 University of Georgia School of Law

Copyrights From A Child's Perspective, Monica Vining

Journal of Intellectual Property Law

No abstract provided.


Is Liability Just A Link Away? Trademark Dilution By Tarnishment Under The Federal Trademark Dilution Act Of 1995 And Hyperlinks On The World Wide Web, Martha Kelley 2016 University of Georgia School of Law

Is Liability Just A Link Away? Trademark Dilution By Tarnishment Under The Federal Trademark Dilution Act Of 1995 And Hyperlinks On The World Wide Web, Martha Kelley

Journal of Intellectual Property Law

No abstract provided.


Democratizing Criminal Law: Feasibility, Utility, And The Challenge Of Social Change, Paul H. Robinson 2016 University of Pennsylvania Law School

Democratizing Criminal Law: Feasibility, Utility, And The Challenge Of Social Change, Paul H. Robinson

Faculty Scholarship

The notion of “democratizing criminal law” has an initial appeal because, after all, we believe in the importance of democracy and because criminal law is so important – it protects us from the most egregious wrongs and is the vehicle by which we allow the most serious governmental intrusions in the lives of individuals. Given criminal law’s special status, isn’t it appropriate that this most important and most intrusive governmental power be subject to the constraints of democratic determination?

But perhaps the initial appeal of this grand principle must give way to practical realities. As much as we are ...


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