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The Rise Of The Global South, The Imf And The Future Of Law And Development, Gabriel Garcia 2016 University of Wollongong

The Rise Of The Global South, The Imf And The Future Of Law And Development, Gabriel Garcia

Dr Gabriel Garcia

After the onset of the Asian Financial Crisis, the world has witnessed a re-accommodation of the global financial system. In the particular case of middle-income countries, they have disentangled themselves from the conditionality of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and grown into more assertive actors in international forums, proposing new alternative mechanisms to become more financially independent and for the provision of development assistance. The article critically reviews the new reality by assessing the strategies deployed by developing countries to reduce the IMF’s influence and explores the potential consequences of the rise of middle-income nations for Law and Development.


Articles-Krieger_4-18-2016.Pdf, Steven A. Krieger 2016 University of California - Los Angeles

Articles-Krieger_4-18-2016.Pdf, Steven A. Krieger

Steven A. Krieger

It is becoming increasingly difficult for the middle class to obtain legal counsel.  The average income for the middle class resident is too high to qualify for pro bono legal services, which are based on the federal poverty guidelines, but not high enough to afford market rate attorneys.  To address this issue, a section of the legal community is providing “low bono” legal counsel to these middle class clients—both through small organizations and solo or small firm attorneys.  These attorneys charge rates that are well below market rates to allow middle class clients affordable access to legal counsel that ...


Revisiting Labor Mobility In Innovation Markets, Jonathan M. Barnett, Ted M. Sichelman 2016 University of Southern California

Revisiting Labor Mobility In Innovation Markets, Jonathan M. Barnett, Ted M. Sichelman

University of Southern California Legal Studies Working Paper Series

It is now widely asserted that legal regimes that enforce contractual and other limitations on labor mobility deter technological innovation. First, recent empirical studies purport to show relationships between bans on enforcing noncompete agreements, increased employee movement, and increased innovation. We find that these studies misconstrue legal differences across states and otherwise are flawed, incomplete, or limited in applicability. Second, scholars have largely adopted the view that California’s policy against noncompetes promoted Silicon Valley as the world’s leading technology center. By contrast, Massachusetts’ enforcement of noncompetes purportedly stunted innovation in the Route 128 region near Boston. We show ...


Newsroom: Horwitz, Vorenberg On Expungement 5-18-2016, Roger Williams University School of Law, Jack Brook 2016 The Indy (College Hill Independent)

Newsroom: Horwitz, Vorenberg On Expungement 5-18-2016, Roger Williams University School Of Law, Jack Brook

Life of the Law School (1993- )

No abstract provided.


Black Marriage, White People, Red Herrings, Melissa Murray 2016 University of California, Berkeley, School of Law

Black Marriage, White People, Red Herrings, Melissa Murray

Melissa Murray

Ralph Richard Banks's Is Marriage for White People? is worlds away from Agatha Christie's novels. Decidedly a work of nonfiction, Banks's book considers the plight of middle-class African Americans who, according to statistics, are the least likely of any demographic group to get and stay married. Despite these obvious differences, Is Marriage for White People? shares some important commonalities with Agatha Christie's mysteries. Banks seeks to solve a mystery, but red herrings draw attention away from the true issue that should be the subject of Banks's concern. The mystery, of course, is the black marriage ...


Black Marriage, White People, Red Herrings, Melissa Murray 2016 University of California, Berkeley, School of Law

Black Marriage, White People, Red Herrings, Melissa Murray

Melissa Murray

Ralph Richard Banks's Is Marriage for White People? is worlds away from Agatha Christie's novels. Decidedly a work of nonfiction, Banks's book considers the plight of middle-class African Americans who, according to statistics, are the least likely of any demographic group to get and stay married. Despite these obvious differences, Is Marriage for White People? shares some important commonalities with Agatha Christie's mysteries. Banks seeks to solve a mystery, but red herrings draw attention away from the true issue that should be the subject of Banks's concern. The mystery, of course, is the black marriage ...


Human Rights Legislation And U.S. Foreign Policy, David Weissbrodt 2016 University of Georgia School of Law

Human Rights Legislation And U.S. Foreign Policy, David Weissbrodt

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


Table Of Contents, Georgia Journal of International and Comparative Law 2016 University of Georgia School of Law

Table Of Contents, Georgia Journal Of International And Comparative Law

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


The Rules Of The Game And The Morality Of Efficient Breach, Gregory Klass 2016 Georgetown University Law Center

The Rules Of The Game And The Morality Of Efficient Breach, Gregory Klass

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

Moralists have long criticized the theory of efficient breach for its advocacy of promise breaking. But a fully developed theory of efficient breach has an internal morality of its own. It argues that sophisticated parties contract for efficient breach, which in the long run maximizes everyone’s welfare. And the theory marks some breaches—those that are opportunistic, obstructive, or otherwise inefficient—as wrongs that the law should deter, as transgressions that should not be priced but punished. That internal morality, however, does not excuse the theory from moral scrutiny. An extended comparison to Jean Renoir’s 1939 film, La ...


Re-Shaming The Debate: Social Norms, Shame, And Regulation In An Internet Age, Kate Klonick 2016 University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law

Re-Shaming The Debate: Social Norms, Shame, And Regulation In An Internet Age, Kate Klonick

Maryland Law Review

Advances in technological communication have dramatically changed the ways in which social norm enforcement is used to constrain behavior. Nowhere is this more powerfully demonstrated than through current events around online shaming and cyber harassment. Low cost, anonymous, instant, and ubiquitous access to the Internet has removed most—if not all—of the natural checks on shaming. The result is norm enforcement that is indeterminate, uncalibrated, and often tips into behavior punishable in its own right—thus generating a debate over whether the state should intervene to curb online shaming and cyber harassment.

A few years before this change in ...


2015 Symposium: Wrongful Convictions: Science, Experience & The Law Keynote Panel Discussion, Mary Kelly Tate, Shawn Armbrust, Michael N. Herring, Douglas A. Ramseur 2016 University of Richmond

2015 Symposium: Wrongful Convictions: Science, Experience & The Law Keynote Panel Discussion, Mary Kelly Tate, Shawn Armbrust, Michael N. Herring, Douglas A. Ramseur

Richmond Journal of Law and the Public Interest

2015 Symposium: Wrongful Convictions: Science, Experience & the Law Keynote Panel Discussion


Compensating The Wrongfully Convicted: A Proposal To Make Victims Of Wrongful Incarceration Whole Again, Alanna Trivelli 2016 University of Richmond

Compensating The Wrongfully Convicted: A Proposal To Make Victims Of Wrongful Incarceration Whole Again, Alanna Trivelli

Richmond Journal of Law and the Public Interest

Part I of this comment presents a brief overview of the current state compensation systems for those who are wrongly imprisoned, including model legislation proposed by the Innocence Project and the current short- comings of compensation statutes across the United States. Part II discusses the principles behind compensatory damages in tort law, and the foundation and reasoning for making a victim whole again. Varying forms of relief are also discussed. Part III applies these principles of tort law to the arena of wrongful convictions to show states have a responsibility to make victims of wrongful convictions whole again. Potential problems ...


Globalization And Gender: Inequality Transformed In Spain, Destiny LeVere 2016 University of Richmond

Globalization And Gender: Inequality Transformed In Spain, Destiny Levere

Washington University Undergraduate Law Review

This article examines the extent to which the boom of globalization led to the transformation of gender inequality in Spain, based on three schools of thought: one, that globalization has transformed gender inequality in Spain for the better by creating equal opportunities, two, that globalization has caused a more stark contrast and practice of gender inequality in Spain, and three, that globalization has made no difference in Spain’s fight with gender inequality. In order to portray the three schools of thought, a comparison will be drawn between what gender roles and opportunities were given to men and women in ...


Shifting Attitudes In The Next Generation Of Male Lawyers: Will The Kids Be As Important As The Courtroom?, Shannon R. Webb, Catherine Loughlin 2016 Fanshawe College of Applied Arts and Technology

Shifting Attitudes In The Next Generation Of Male Lawyers: Will The Kids Be As Important As The Courtroom?, Shannon R. Webb, Catherine Loughlin

Western Journal of Legal Studies

We adopted role salience measures to assess whether commitments to occupational, parental, and marital roles differed between male and female law students. The results indicated that male law students were slightly more committed to occupational roles. We also found that male and female law students were equally committed to marital and childcare roles. Surprisingly, male and female law students reported equal self-efficacy to manage work-life conflict. Therefore, the study suggests that the decision to opt out of legal careers likely occurs more at the workplace level and is less attributed to pre-career commitment or self-efficacy levels.


The Teaching Of International Law, Myres S. McDougal 2016 Yale Law School

The Teaching Of International Law, Myres S. Mcdougal

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


The Teaching Of International Law, Edward McWhinney 2016 Institut de Droit International

The Teaching Of International Law, Edward Mcwhinney

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


The Proper Reach Of Territorial Jurisdiction: A Case Study Of Divergent Attitudes, Philippe Schreiber 2016 Columbia University

The Proper Reach Of Territorial Jurisdiction: A Case Study Of Divergent Attitudes, Philippe Schreiber

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


The Proper Reach Of Territorial Jurisdiction: A Case Study Of Divergent Attitudes, Robert Y. Jennings 2016 Cambridge University

The Proper Reach Of Territorial Jurisdiction: A Case Study Of Divergent Attitudes, Robert Y. Jennings

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


The Place Of Policy In International Law, Richard A. Falk 2016 Princeton University

The Place Of Policy In International Law, Richard A. Falk

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


The Place Of Policy In International Law, Oscar Schachter 2016 United Nations Institute for Training and Research

The Place Of Policy In International Law, Oscar Schachter

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


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