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1365 full-text articles. Page 1 of 32.

Incomplete Takings, Abraham Bell, Gideon Parchomovsky 2017 University of San Diego

Incomplete Takings, Abraham Bell, Gideon Parchomovsky

Faculty Scholarship

Incomplete takings are vital and extremely common. Yet, they present unique challenges that cannot be resolved by standard rules of eminent domain. In particular, incomplete, or partial, takings may result in the creation of suboptimal parcels, and even unusable and unmarketable ones. Additionally, partial takings create nettlesome assessment problems that do not arise when parcels are taken as a whole. Finally, incomplete takings engender opportunities for inefficient strategic behavior on the part of the government after the partial taking has been carried out. Current partial takings jurisprudence fails to resolve these problems, and, in some instances even exacerbates them.

In ...


Frivolous Action Filings In California Courts, California Research Bureau 2017 Golden Gate University School of Law

Frivolous Action Filings In California Courts, California Research Bureau

California Agencies

No abstract provided.


You Can't Fire Me: The Problems With Wrongful Dismissal Damages In Canada, Chenyang Li 2017 The University of Western Ontario

You Can't Fire Me: The Problems With Wrongful Dismissal Damages In Canada, Chenyang Li

Western Journal of Legal Studies

The assessment of wrongful dismissal damages in Canadian law has long been governed by the principles established in Bardal v Globe & Mail Ltd. Although this model of analysis has been met with near universal approval in every decision-making forum in Canada, the principles underlying Bardal warrant further discussion. This work focuses on the contractual core of employment disputes and analyzes the interpretive framework for common law claims for wrongful dismissal. It will show that the traditional law of private remedies has been distorted in the context of wrongful dismissal as a result of the wholesale adoption of the Bardal Factors ...


Newsroom: Logan On Trump And Libel Law 01-03-2017, Roger Williams University School of Law 2017 Roger Williams University

Newsroom: Logan On Trump And Libel Law 01-03-2017, Roger Williams University School Of Law

Life of the Law School (1993- )

No abstract provided.


Legal Resources On The Trump Immigration Ban, Center for Constitutional Law 2017 The University of Akron

Legal Resources On The Trump Immigration Ban, Center For Constitutional Law

Con Law Center Articles and Publications

This resource bibliography provides legal resources related to the litigation over the presidential immigration ban issued on Jan. 27, 2017. These resources include the executive order, key court decisions, and explanatory commentary.


Us-Cool Retaliation: The Wto’S Article 22.6 Arbitration, Chad P. Bown, Rachel Brewster 2017 Duke Law School

Us-Cool Retaliation: The Wto’S Article 22.6 Arbitration, Chad P. Bown, Rachel Brewster

Faculty Scholarship

This paper examines the Article 22.6 arbitration report of the WTO dispute over the United States’ country of original labeling (US-COOL) regulation for meat products. At prior phases of the legal process, a WTO Panel and the Appellate Body had sided with Canada and Mexico by finding that the US regulation had negatively affected their exports of livestock – cattle and hogs – to the US market. The arbitrators authorized Canada and Mexico to retaliate by over $1 billion against US exports; this is the second largest authorized retaliation on record and only the twelfth WTO dispute to reach the stage ...


Aviation Law: Warsaw Convention Liability Principles Extend To Damage From Terrorist Attack, Leon Adams Jr. 2016 University of Georgia School of Law

Aviation Law: Warsaw Convention Liability Principles Extend To Damage From Terrorist Attack, Leon Adams Jr.

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


Access To Communication In United States Prisons: Reducing Recidivism Through Expanded Communication Programs With Inmates, Lilie Gross 2016 University of Puget Sound

Access To Communication In United States Prisons: Reducing Recidivism Through Expanded Communication Programs With Inmates, Lilie Gross

Politics & Government Undergraduate Theses

The need for better communication systems in prisons is dire and will reduce recidivism rates in the United States. Not only is communication via phone lines extremely expensive and corrupt, it is almost impossible. Inmates in United States Prisons need this availability and option to communicate with their families and maintain outside relationships. While maintaining healthy and positive relationships is good for inmate's mental health, it also decreases the risk of recidivism. This paper aims to highlight the benefits of phone communication and relationships between inmates and family on the outside for it will decrease the 50% recidivism rate ...


The Appropriations Power And Sovereign Immunity, Paul F. Figley, Jay Tidmarsh 2016 Washington College of Law, American University

The Appropriations Power And Sovereign Immunity, Paul F. Figley, Jay Tidmarsh

Paul Figley

Discussions of sovereign immunity assume that the Constitution contains no explicit text regarding sovereign immunity. As a result, arguments about the existence-or nonexistence-of sovereign immunity begin with the English and American common-law doctrines. Exploring political, fiscal, and legal developments in England and the American colonies in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, this Article shows that focusing on common-law developments is misguided. The common-law approach to sovereign immunity ended in the early 1700s. The Bankers' Case (1690- 1700), which is often regarded as the first modern common-law treatment of sovereign immunity, is in fact the last in the line of English ...


Capping Incentives, Capping Innovation, Courting Disaster: The Gulf Oil Spill And Arbitrary Limits On Civil Liability, Andrew F. Popper 2016 American University Washington College of Law

Capping Incentives, Capping Innovation, Courting Disaster: The Gulf Oil Spill And Arbitrary Limits On Civil Liability, Andrew F. Popper

Andrew Popper

Limiting liability by establishing an arbitrary cap on civil damages is bad public policy. Caps are antithetical to the interests of consumers and at odds with the national interest in creating incentives for better and safer products. Whether the caps are on non-economic loss, punitive damages, or set for specific activity, they undermine the civil justice system, deceiving juries and denying just and reasonable compensation for victims in a broad range of fields.

This Article postulates that capped liability on damages for offshore oil spills may well have been an instrumental factor contributing to the recent Deepwater Horizon catastrophe in ...


Capping Incentives, Capping Innovation, Courting Disaster: The Gulf Oil Spill And Arbitrary Limits On Civil Liability, Andrew F. Popper 2016 American University Washington College of Law

Capping Incentives, Capping Innovation, Courting Disaster: The Gulf Oil Spill And Arbitrary Limits On Civil Liability, Andrew F. Popper

Andrew Popper

Limiting liability by establishing an arbitrary cap on civil damages is bad public policy. Caps are antithetical to the interests of consumers and at odds with the national interest in creating incentives for better and safer products. Whether the caps are on non-economic loss, punitive damages, or set for specific activity, they undermine the civil justice system, deceiving juries and denying just and reasonable compensation for victims in a broad range of fields.

This Article postulates that capped liability on damages for offshore oil spills may well have been an instrumental factor contributing to the recent Deepwater Horizon catastrophe in ...


Revaluing Restitution: From The Talmud To Postsocialism, Michael A. Heller, Christopher Serkin 2016 University of Michigan Law School

Revaluing Restitution: From The Talmud To Postsocialism, Michael A. Heller, Christopher Serkin

Christopher Serkin

Whatever happened to the study of restitution? Once a core private law subject along with property, torts, and contracts, restitution has receded from American legal scholarship. Few law professors teach the material, fewer still write in the area, and no one even agrees what the field comprises anymore. Hanoch Dagan's Unjust Enrichment: A Study of Private Law and Public Values threatens to reverse the tide and make restitution interesting again. The book takes commonplace words such as "value" and "gain" and shows how they embody a society's underlying normative principles. Variations across cultures in the law of unjust ...


Empowering Individual Plaintiffs, Alex Stein, Gideon Parchomovsky 2016 Brooklyn Law School

Empowering Individual Plaintiffs, Alex Stein, Gideon Parchomovsky

Faculty Scholarship

The individual plaintiff plays a critical—yet, underappreciated—role in our legal system. Only lawsuits that are brought by individual plaintiffs allow the law to achieve the twin goals of efficiency and fairness. The ability of individual plaintiffs to seek justice against those who wronged them deters wrongdoing, ex ante, and in those cases in which a wrong has been committed nevertheless, it guarantees the payment of compensation, ex post. No other form of litigation, including class actions and criminal prosecutions, or even compensation funds, can accomplish the same result. Yet, as we show in this Essay, in many key ...


Postracial Remedies, Derrick Darby, Richard E. Levy 2016 University of Michigan

Postracial Remedies, Derrick Darby, Richard E. Levy

University of Michigan Journal of Law Reform

The Supreme Court’s equal protection jurisprudence is decidedly postracial. The Court has restricted the Equal Protection Clause to intentional discrimination by the government, concluding that the Constitution does not prohibit private acts of discrimination and rejecting challenges based on disparate impact, even when rigorous statistical analysis indicates that race is likely a factor. It has held that remedying the effects of past societal discrimination is an insufficient basis for race-specific remedies such as affirmative action. It has also ended remedies of this sort designed to combat previous state-sponsored racial discrimination, such as court-ordered desegregation measures in the schools and ...


Neuroimaging Evidence: A Solution To The Problem Of Proving Pain And Suffering?, Brady Somers 2016 Seattle University School of Law

Neuroimaging Evidence: A Solution To The Problem Of Proving Pain And Suffering?, Brady Somers

Seattle University Law Review

Envision a plaintiff who was injured on the job at a construction site due to his employer’s negligence. The plaintiff has chronic back pain, but it is not verifiable on an X-ray, nor is a physical injury readily discernible by any other technology. Presently, fact finders are given the broad discretion to decide whether they find this plaintiff credible, and accordingly, whether they believe he is truly in pain and deserves damages for pain and suffering. However, neuroimaging—specifically functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)—could allow those fact finders to visualize whether this plaintiff was hurting by depicting the ...


Environmental Justice And Community-Based Reparations, Catherine Millas Kaiman 2016 Seattle University School of Law

Environmental Justice And Community-Based Reparations, Catherine Millas Kaiman

Seattle University Law Review

This Article seeks to illuminate the lack of adequate legal remedies that are available for low-income, predominantly minority communities that have suffered historic environmental injustices. The Article not only discusses the lack of adequate legal remedies, but also proposes the use of local, state, and federal reparations programs for communities that have previously suffered environmental injustices; are still living with the effects of environmental injustices, by way of disease, air, soil, and water pollution; or are suffering current and ongoing environmental injustices. As has been recently illustrated by Michigan’s state action of providing lead-contaminated water for over a year ...


Khoury V. Seastrand, 132 Nev. Adv. Op. 52 (July 28, 2016), Ronni Boskovich 2016 Nevada Law Journal

Khoury V. Seastrand, 132 Nev. Adv. Op. 52 (July 28, 2016), Ronni Boskovich

Nevada Supreme Court Summaries

The Court considered three consolidated appeals from a district court judgment, pursuant to a jury verdict, and post-judgment orders awarding costs and denying a new trial in a personal injury action. While the Court addressed numerous issues, the following three questions comprised the bulk of the consolidated appeals: (1) whether an attorney may ask prospective jurors questions concerning a specific verdict amount to determine potential bias or prejudice; (2) whether repeatedly asking questions about that specific amount results in jury indoctrination warranting a mistrial; and (3) when a district court abuses its discretion in dismissing jurors for cause under Jitnan ...


Denying Access To Justice During A Carceral Crisis, Brett Dignam 2016 New York Law School

Denying Access To Justice During A Carceral Crisis, Brett Dignam

Impact Center for Public Interest Law

No abstract provided.


Does Rigorously Enforcing Arbitration Agreements Promote “Autonomy”?, Hiro N. Aragaki 2016 Loyola Law School

Does Rigorously Enforcing Arbitration Agreements Promote “Autonomy”?, Hiro N. Aragaki

Indiana Law Journal

In recent years, the U.S. Supreme Court has helped transform arbitration law into a radical private-ordering regime in which freedom of contract has come to eclipse public regulation. Arbitration jurisprudence justifies this transformation in part on a profound and longstanding commitment to the ideal of individual autonomy, understood as the freedom—lacking in litigation—to select a disputing process best suited to one’s needs.

In this Article, I question the cogency of this justification. I argue, first, that autonomy has had different and sometimes conflicting meanings even within arbitration jurisprudence. Second, depending on the meaning one ascribes to ...


Deterring Innovation: New York V. Actavis And The Duty To Subsidize Competitors' Market Theory, Joanna M. Shepherd 2016 Emory University School of Law

Deterring Innovation: New York V. Actavis And The Duty To Subsidize Competitors' Market Theory, Joanna M. Shepherd

Minnesota Journal of Law, Science & Technology

No abstract provided.


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