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Creating A Workplace Culture Of Civility And Respect: Preventing Unlawful Harassment And Discrimination, Rose Davenport 2018 University of New Mexico

Creating A Workplace Culture Of Civility And Respect: Preventing Unlawful Harassment And Discrimination, Rose Davenport

Shared Knowledge Conference

This research project identifies a plan to study best practices addressing unlawful workplace harassment and discrimination in New Mexico-based hospital healthcare systems. Initially, this project focusses on Presbyterian Healthcare Services and the University of New Mexico Hospital, with the possibility of including other local healthcare systems. In light of recent developments from “#MeToo” and “Time’s Up” movements, the issues of unlawful sexual harassment and discrimination are hot topics in today’s society and need to be more openly addressed by all levels of an organization, in order to identify these issues head-on and hopefully prevent them from continuing to ...


Tennessee's Death Penalty Lottery, Bradley A. MacLean, H. E. Miller Jr. 2018 University of Tennessee, Knoxville

Tennessee's Death Penalty Lottery, Bradley A. Maclean, H. E. Miller Jr.

Tennessee Journal of Law and Policy

Over the past 40 years, Tennessee has imposed sustained death sentences on 86 of the more than 2,500 defendants found guilty of first degree murder; and the State has executed only six of those defendants. How are those few selected? Is Tennessee consistently and reliably sentencing to death only the “worst of the bad”? To answer these questions, we surveyed all of Tennessee’s first degree murder cases since 1977, when Tennessee enacted its current capital punishment system. Tennessee’s scheme was designed in response to the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision in Furman v. Georgia, which held ...


Now Is The Winter Of Ginsburg's Dissent: Unifying The Circuit Split As To Preliminary Injunctions And Establishing A Sliding Scale Test, Taylor Payne 2018 University of Tennessee, Knoxville

Now Is The Winter Of Ginsburg's Dissent: Unifying The Circuit Split As To Preliminary Injunctions And Establishing A Sliding Scale Test, Taylor Payne

Tennessee Journal of Law and Policy

The preliminary injunction is an equitable remedy that may be granted to prevent harm to a movant before adjudication on the merits can be reached. The United States Supreme Court most recently iterated in Winter v. National Resource Defense Counsel, Inc. the four factors a court must consider for a preliminary injunction to issue.[1] A movant seeking a preliminary injunction must establish that the movant is likely to succeed on the merits; that the movant is likely to suffer irreparable harm in the absence of preliminary relief; that the balance of equities tips in the movant’s favor; and ...


Rethinking Title Vii's Protections Against Sex Discrimination In An Employment Context, Tyler Corcoran 2018 University of Tennessee College of Law

Rethinking Title Vii's Protections Against Sex Discrimination In An Employment Context, Tyler Corcoran

Tennessee Journal of Law and Policy

No abstract provided.


Volume 13, Issue 1 (Summer 2018), Tennessee Journal of Law & Policy N/A 2018 The University of Tennessee College of Law

Volume 13, Issue 1 (Summer 2018), Tennessee Journal Of Law & Policy N/A

Tennessee Journal of Law and Policy

No abstract provided.


The Past, Present, And Future Of Presidential Power, Saikrishna Bangalore Prakash 2018 University of St. Thomas, Minnesota

The Past, Present, And Future Of Presidential Power, Saikrishna Bangalore Prakash

University of St. Thomas Law Journal

No abstract provided.


The President And The Myth Of Judicial Supremacy, Michael Stokes Paulsen 2018 University of St. Thomas School of Law

The President And The Myth Of Judicial Supremacy, Michael Stokes Paulsen

University of St. Thomas Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Appearing Unbiased About Presidential War Powers, Jide Nzelibe 2018 University of St. Thomas, Minnesota

Appearing Unbiased About Presidential War Powers, Jide Nzelibe

University of St. Thomas Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Why I Can't Be Like Mike: At Least With Respect To His Overly Broad View Of Presidential Power To Act On Independent Constitutional Interpretation, Vikram David Amar 2018 University of St. Thomas, Minnesota

Why I Can't Be Like Mike: At Least With Respect To His Overly Broad View Of Presidential Power To Act On Independent Constitutional Interpretation, Vikram David Amar

University of St. Thomas Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Freedom Of Research And The Right To Science: From Theory To Advocacy, Andrea Boggio, Romano P.R. Cesare 2018 Bryant University

Freedom Of Research And The Right To Science: From Theory To Advocacy, Andrea Boggio, Romano P.R. Cesare

History and Social Sciences Faculty Journal Articles

While international law recognizes a human right to science, the binding normative content of this right needs to be better clarified and specified. To advance our understanding of this understudied right, this chapter offers a theoretical analysis of ways in which the right to science can be realized. The chapter is divided in three sections: the first section discusses the recognition of the right to science under international and regional legal instruments; the second presents a literature review; and the third discusses how judicial and political mobilisation as paths to contribute to our understating of this right and defining its ...


Taxonomy Of Minority Governments, Lisa La Fornara 2018 Maurer School of Law: Indiana University

Taxonomy Of Minority Governments, Lisa La Fornara

Indiana Journal of Constitutional Design

A minority government in its most basic form is a government in which the party holding the most parliamentary seats still has fewer than half the seats in parliament and therefore cannot pass legislation or advance policy without support from unaffiliated parties. Because seats in minority parliaments are more evenly distributed amongst multiple parties, opposition parties have greater opportunity to block legislation. A minority government must therefore negotiate with external parties and adjust its policies to garner the majority of votes required to advance its initiatives.

This paper serves as a taxonomy of minority governments in recent history and proceeds ...


Cracking Down On Cages: Feminist And Prison Abolitionist Considerations For Litigating Solitary Confinement In Canada, Winnie Phillips-Osei 2018 Western University

Cracking Down On Cages: Feminist And Prison Abolitionist Considerations For Litigating Solitary Confinement In Canada, Winnie Phillips-Osei

Master of Laws Research Papers Repository

Guided by prison abolition ethic and intersectional feminism, my key argument is that Charter section 15 is the ideal means of eradicating solitary confinement and its adverse impact on women who are Aboriginal, racialized, mentally ill, or immigration detainees. I utilize a provincial superior court’s failing in exploring a discrimination analysis concerning Aboriginal women, to illustrate my key argument. However, because of the piecemeal fashion in which courts can effect developments in the law, the abolition of solitary confinement may very well occur through a series of ‘little wins’. In Chapter 11, I provide a constitutional analysis, arguing that ...


Church History, Liberty, And Political Morality: A Response To Professor Calhoun, Ian Huyett 2018 Washington and Lee University School of Law

Church History, Liberty, And Political Morality: A Response To Professor Calhoun, Ian Huyett

Washington and Lee Law Review Online

In his address, Professor Calhoun used American Christian abolitionism to illustrate the beneficial role that religion can play in political debate. Surveying the past two millennia, I argue that Christian political thought has protected liberty in every era of the church’s dramatic history. Along the way, I rebut critics—from the left and right—who urge that Christianity’s political influence has been unhelpful or harmful. I also seek to show that statements like “religion has no place in politics” are best understood as expressions of arbitrary bias.


Special Problems For Prosecutors In Public Corruption Prosecutions, Mimi Rocah, Carrie Cohen, Steve Cohen, Daniel Cort, Bennett L. Gershman 2018 Elisabeth Haub School of Law at Pace University

Special Problems For Prosecutors In Public Corruption Prosecutions, Mimi Rocah, Carrie Cohen, Steve Cohen, Daniel Cort, Bennett L. Gershman

Pace Law Review

The focus of this panel is not so much on the academic part of McDonnell, the case law. Of course, you’ll hear the name McDonnell and we’ll talk about that.

But we’re trying to talk a little more broadly about public corruption prosecutions in general. Some of these are unique issues. You heard a little bit about them from the former people who have done them, what special unique problems are involved in them and challenges the prosecutors face and what effect, if any.


How Should Congress Respond To Mcdonnell?, David Yassky, Kathleen Clark, Allen Dickerson, Jennifer Rodgers 2018 Elisabeth Haub School of Law at Pace University

How Should Congress Respond To Mcdonnell?, David Yassky, Kathleen Clark, Allen Dickerson, Jennifer Rodgers

Pace Law Review

Discussion of question of whether McDonnell was essentially right or wrong. Should Congress act to change the McDonnell rule? Should the Supreme Court reconsider it? What would be an alternative or a better way, if there is one, to approach the question of public corruption prosecution?


How Has Mcdonnell Affected Prosecutors’ Ability To Police Public Corruption? What Are Politicians And Lobbyists Allowed To Do, And What Are Prosecutors Able To Prosecute?, Vincent L. Briccetti, Amie Ely, Alexandra Shapiro, Dan Stein 2018 U.S. District Court, Southern District of New York

How Has Mcdonnell Affected Prosecutors’ Ability To Police Public Corruption? What Are Politicians And Lobbyists Allowed To Do, And What Are Prosecutors Able To Prosecute?, Vincent L. Briccetti, Amie Ely, Alexandra Shapiro, Dan Stein

Pace Law Review

The question posed to the panelists on the first panel is: How has McDonnell affected prosecutors’ ability to police public corruption? What can politicians and lobbyists do and what can prosecutors prosecute?


Primer, Samantha Conway, David Diab, Amanda Fiorilla, Eric Grossfeld 2018 Elisabeth Haub School of Law at Pace University

Primer, Samantha Conway, David Diab, Amanda Fiorilla, Eric Grossfeld

Pace Law Review

Discussion and history of public corruption statutes and the prosecution of public officials through McDonnell v. United States, 136 S. Ct. 2355 (2016).


Introduction, Mimi Rocah 2018 Elisabeth Haub School of Law at Pace University

Introduction, Mimi Rocah

Pace Law Review

On March 9, 2018, the Elisabeth Haub School of Law at Pace University hosted Public Corruption Prosecution After McDonnell, a symposium that brought together law enforcement, practitioners, academics and media that covers these cases to gain insight and input from these disparate groups. The Symposium convened three panels to discuss how McDonnell has affected prosecutors’ ability to police public corruption; to offer legislative responses to McDonnell; and to examine the inherently unique nature of public corruption prosecutions. A central aim of the day-long event was to simultaneously tackle these challenging issues while distilling complex legal analysis in a manner suitable ...


The Paradox Of Christian-Based Political Advocacy: A Reply To Professor Calhoun, Wayne R. Barnes 2018 Texas A&M University School of Law

The Paradox Of Christian-Based Political Advocacy: A Reply To Professor Calhoun, Wayne R. Barnes

Washington and Lee Law Review Online

Professor Calhoun, in his Article around which this

symposium is based, has asserted that it is permissible for citizens

to publicly argue for laws or public policy solutions based on

explicitly religious reasons.1 Calhoun candidly admits that he has

“long grappled” with this question (as have I, though he for longer),

and, in probably the biggest understatement in this entire

symposium, notes that Professor Kent Greenawalt identified this

as “a particularly significant, debatable, and highly complex

problem.”2 Is it ever. I have a position that I will advance in this

article, but I wish to acknowledge at the ...


America's Creed: The Inevitable, Sometimes Dangerous, Mixing Of Religion And Politics, David M. Smolin 2018 Cumberland Law School, Samford University

America's Creed: The Inevitable, Sometimes Dangerous, Mixing Of Religion And Politics, David M. Smolin

Washington and Lee Law Review Online

Political and philosophical theorists have often advocated for

the exclusion of some or all religious perspectives from full

participation in politics. Such approaches create criteria—such as

public accessibility, public reason, or secular rationale—to

legitimate such exclusion. During the 1990s I argued, as an

evangelical Christian, against such exclusionary theories,

defending the rights to full and equal political participation by

evangelical Christians, traditionalist Roman Catholics, and any

others who would be restricted by such criteria.


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