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21st Century Arms Control Challenges: Drones, Cyber Weapons, Killer Robots, And Wmds, Mary Ellen O'Connell 2016 Notre Dame Law School

21st Century Arms Control Challenges: Drones, Cyber Weapons, Killer Robots, And Wmds, Mary Ellen O'Connell

Mary Ellen O'Connell

The world faces tough arms control challenges from preventing the development and use of weapons of mass destruction to regulating the new weapons of the computer revolution. This article considers what works in arms control. Using military force in violation of international law to destroy nuclear facilities, to stop weapons shipments, or to punish the use of prohibited weapons typically fails. Diplomacy paired with lawful counter-measures has the superior track record. Reviving the art of diplomacy and re-committing to authentic international law will pay dividends in peace and security.


Regulation Fd: An Alternative Approach To Addressing Information Asymmetry, Jill E. Fisch 2016 University of Pennsylvania Law School

Regulation Fd: An Alternative Approach To Addressing Information Asymmetry, Jill E. Fisch

Jill Fisch

This chapter traces the development of the SEC’s use of Regulation Fair Disclosure (FD) to address information asymmetry in the securities markets. The chapter describes the SEC’s developing enforcement policy and notes, in particular, the SEC’s efforts, through its selection and settlement of Regulation FD cases, to provide guidance to corporations and corporate officials about areas of key concern. The chapter concludes by highlighting current areas of particular importance, including disclosure of information through private meetings and the implications of technological innovations such as the internet and social media. The chapter is forthcoming in Research Handbook on ...


Anonymous Armies: Modern “Cyber-Combatants” And Their Prospective Rights Under International Humanitarian Law, Jake B. Sher 2016 Pace University School of Law

Anonymous Armies: Modern “Cyber-Combatants” And Their Prospective Rights Under International Humanitarian Law, Jake B. Sher

Pace International Law Review

Cyber-attacks take many forms, only some of which are applicable to the law of war. This Comment discusses only those attacks sponsored by a government or non-state entity that have the goal of affecting morale or gaining political advantage, or those attacks amounting to tactical strikes on state or civilian infrastructure. In that vein, this Comment proposes the adoption of a new legal framework for determining the threshold that marks a participant in such a cyber-attack as a “cyber-combatant” by adapting the framework set by the Geneva Conventions and existing custom. This definition should encompass cyber-attacks perpetrated by states, unrecognized ...


The Erosion Of Autonomy In Online Consumer Transactions, Eliza MIK 2016 Singapore Management University

The Erosion Of Autonomy In Online Consumer Transactions, Eliza Mik

Eliza Mik

Online businesses influence consumer behaviour by means of a wide range of technologies that determine what information is displayed as well as how and when it is displayed. This creates an unprecedented power imbalance between the transacting parties, raising questions not only about the permissible levels of procedural exploitation in contract law, together with the adequacy of existing consumer protections but also about the impact of technology on consumer autonomy. There is, however, no single technology that threatens the latter. It is the combined, mutually-enforcing effect of multiple technologies that influence consumer choices at different stages in the transacting process ...


Neuroimaging Evidence: A Solution To The Problem Of Proving Pain And Suffering?, Brady Somers 2016 Seattle University School of Law

Neuroimaging Evidence: A Solution To The Problem Of Proving Pain And Suffering?, Brady Somers

Seattle University Law Review

Envision a plaintiff who was injured on the job at a construction site due to his employer’s negligence. The plaintiff has chronic back pain, but it is not verifiable on an X-ray, nor is a physical injury readily discernible by any other technology. Presently, fact finders are given the broad discretion to decide whether they find this plaintiff credible, and accordingly, whether they believe he is truly in pain and deserves damages for pain and suffering. However, neuroimaging—specifically functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)—could allow those fact finders to visualize whether this plaintiff was hurting by depicting the ...


Wearable Fitness Devices: Personal Health Data Privacy In Washington State, Steven Spann 2016 Seattle University School of Law

Wearable Fitness Devices: Personal Health Data Privacy In Washington State, Steven Spann

Seattle University Law Review

Private entities are increasingly targeting individuals in the United States and around the world to gather personal data for such purposes as product development, market identification, and insurance risk assessment. While credit card records and online browsing histories have long been the medium through which this data is gathered, in more recent years, wearable fitness devices have added a new dimension to data production and collection. These devices are capable of gathering a significant amount of data regarding a person’s physical and physiological characteristics, thereby exposing these data producers to personal privacy infringement. Washington State lawmakers and citizens must ...


Therasense V. Becton Dickinson: A First Impression, Jason Rantanen, Lee Petherbridge 2016 Yale Law School

Therasense V. Becton Dickinson: A First Impression, Jason Rantanen, Lee Petherbridge

Jason Rantanen

This Article provides the first major analysis of the very recent en banc decision of the United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit in the now famous Therasense v. Becton Dickinson. The doctrinal issue central to the case is inequitable conduct, a judicially created doctrine developed to punish patent applicants who behave inappropriately during patent prosecution, the ex parte process of patent creation. The core thesis of this Article is that Therasense could have a much more significant, complex, and nuanced impact on the legal infrastructure of American innovation than the opinion for the court appears to appreciate ...


Therasense V. Becton Dickinson: A First Impression, Jason Rantanen, Lee Petherbridge 2016 Yale Law School

Therasense V. Becton Dickinson: A First Impression, Jason Rantanen, Lee Petherbridge

Jason Rantanen

This Article provides the first major analysis of the very recent en banc decision of the United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit in the now famous Therasense v. Becton Dickinson. The doctrinal issue central to the case is inequitable conduct, a judicially created doctrine developed to punish patent applicants who behave inappropriately during patent prosecution, the ex parte process of patent creation. The core thesis of this Article is that Therasense could have a much more significant, complex, and nuanced impact on the legal infrastructure of American innovation than the opinion for the court appears to appreciate ...


Recalibrating Our Empirical Understanding Of Inequitable Conduct, Jason Rantanen 2016 University of Iowa College of Law

Recalibrating Our Empirical Understanding Of Inequitable Conduct, Jason Rantanen

Jason Rantanen

No abstract provided.


Patents And Traditional Knowledge Of The Uses Of Plants: Is A Communal Patent Regime Part Of The Solution To The Scourge Of Bio Piracy, Ikechi Mgbeoji 2016 University of British Columbia, Vancouver

Patents And Traditional Knowledge Of The Uses Of Plants: Is A Communal Patent Regime Part Of The Solution To The Scourge Of Bio Piracy, Ikechi Mgbeoji

Ikechi Mgbeoji

No abstract provided.


A New Take On An Old Problem: Employee Misclassification In The Modern Gig-Economy, Jennifer Pinsof 2016 University of Michigan Law School

A New Take On An Old Problem: Employee Misclassification In The Modern Gig-Economy, Jennifer Pinsof

Michigan Telecommunications and Technology Law Review

For decades, U.S. labor and employment law has used a binary employment classification system, labeling workers as either employees or independent contractors. Employees are granted a variety of legal protections, while independent contractors are not. However, the explosion of the gig-economy—which connects consumers with underutilized resources—has produced a growing number of workers who do not seem to fit into either category. Though far from traditional employees, gig-workers bear little resemblance to independent contractors. Forced to choose, however, most gig-economy companies label their workers as independent contractors, depriving them of many basic worker-protections. Gig-workers have turned to the ...


Judges As Film Critics: New Approaches To Filmic Evidence, Jessica M. Silbey 2016 Suffolk University

Judges As Film Critics: New Approaches To Filmic Evidence, Jessica M. Silbey

Jessica Silbey

This Article exposes internal contradictions in case law concerning the use and admissibility of film as evidence. Based on a review of more than ninety state and federal cases dating from 1923 to the present, the Article explains how the source of these contradictions is the frequent miscategorization of film as "demonstrative evidence" that purports to illustrate other evidence, rather than to be directly probative of some fact at issue. The Article further demonstrates how these contradictions are based on two venerable jurisprudential anxieties. One is the concern about the growing trend toward replacing the traditional testimony of live witnesses ...


Judges As Film Critics: New Approaches To Filmic Evidence, Jessica M. Silbey 2016 Suffolk University

Judges As Film Critics: New Approaches To Filmic Evidence, Jessica M. Silbey

Jessica Silbey

This Article exposes internal contradictions in case law concerning the use and admissibility of film as evidence. Based on a review of more than ninety state and federal cases dating from 1923 to the present, the Article explains how the source of these contradictions is the frequent miscategorization of film as "demonstrative evidence" that purports to illustrate other evidence, rather than to be directly probative of some fact at issue. The Article further demonstrates how these contradictions are based on two venerable jurisprudential anxieties. One is the concern about the growing trend toward replacing the traditional testimony of live witnesses ...


Uncle Sam Is Watching You: A Recommendation For Minnesota Legislation Regarding Police Drone Use, Joe R. Paquette 2016 Mitchell Hamline School of Law

Uncle Sam Is Watching You: A Recommendation For Minnesota Legislation Regarding Police Drone Use, Joe R. Paquette

Mitchell Hamline Law Review

No abstract provided.


University Ip: The University As Coordinator Of The Team Production Process, Samuel Estreicher, Kristina A. Yost 2016 NYU School of Law

University Ip: The University As Coordinator Of The Team Production Process, Samuel Estreicher, Kristina A. Yost

Indiana Law Journal

This Article focuses on intellectual property (IP) issues in the university setting. Often, universities require faculty who have been hired in whole or in part to invent to assign inventions created within the scope of their employment to the university. In addition, the most effective way to secure compliance with the Bayh-Dole Act, which deals with ownership of inventions involving federally funded research, is for the university to take title to such inventions. Failure to specify who has title can result in title passing to the government. Once the university asserts ownership, it then decides whether to process a patent ...


The Fcc And The “Pre-Internet”, John Blevins 2016 Loyola University School of Law - New Orleans

The Fcc And The “Pre-Internet”, John Blevins

Indiana Law Journal

Network neutrality has dominated broadband policy debates for the past decade. While important, network neutrality overshadows other policy levers that are equally important to the goals of better, cheaper, and more open broadband service. This lack of perspective has historical precedent—and understanding this history can help refocus today’s policy debate. In the 1960s and 1970s, telephone companies threatened the growth of the nascent data industry. The FCC responded with a series of rulemakings known as the “Computer Inquiries” proceedings. In the literature, Computer Inquiries enjoys hallowed status as a key foundation of the Internet’s rise.

This Article ...


No Need To Reinvent The Wheel: Why Existing Liability Law Does Not Need To Be Preemptively Altered To Cope With The Debut Of The Driverless Car, Jeremy Levy 2016 Pepperdine University

No Need To Reinvent The Wheel: Why Existing Liability Law Does Not Need To Be Preemptively Altered To Cope With The Debut Of The Driverless Car, Jeremy Levy

The Journal of Business, Entrepreneurship & the Law

First, in part I, this article seeks to explore the background of driverless vehicles, including their history, the technology involved, and general issues and potential problems that may arise from these vehicles entering the market. In part II, the article will discuss existing regulations already in place for autonomous driverless vehicles in both state and federal law. Part III will examine two proposals, those for additional laws, or for the adaptation of existing laws to create new liability schemes, and how most of these proposals are either inadequate or overbroad. Part IV will examine liability waiver for accidents, strict liability ...


Is Copyright Evolving Or Mutating? What American Broadcasting Cos. V. Aereo, Inc. Says About U.S. Copyright Law In The Twenty-First Century, Allison Davenport 2016 Pepperdine University

Is Copyright Evolving Or Mutating? What American Broadcasting Cos. V. Aereo, Inc. Says About U.S. Copyright Law In The Twenty-First Century, Allison Davenport

The Journal of Business, Entrepreneurship & the Law

In this article, I will look in-depth at the case of American Broadcasting Cos. v. Aereo, Inc. (Aereo). Aereo centers on an alleged infringement of American Broadcasting Company's (ABC)'s public performance right that was achieved through a complicated technological process meant to circumvent the law. In its opinion, the Supreme Court of the United States tries to stretch the language of the Copyright Act to apply to new technology by analogizing it with more familiar processes, while the dissent calls for reform to come from Congress, not the courts. Before my discussion of the Aereo decision, I will ...


An Alternate Functionality Reality, Harold R. Weinberg 2016 University of Kentucky College of Law

An Alternate Functionality Reality, Harold R. Weinberg

Journal of Intellectual Property Law

The Supreme Court last addressed trade dress law’s functionality doctrine in TrafFix Devices, Inc. v. Marketing Displays, Inc. decided in 2001. This article applies content analysis to data from post-TrafFix functionality cases to provide insights concerning the functionality doctrine. It emphasizes data from cases concerning motions for summary judgment and preliminary injunction. The analysis employs two conceptual constructs: a “useful/aesthetic continuum” and “mixed-character” design features. The article also considers data in light of a “two-bar mandate” and two principles: “useful-scarcity” and “aesthetic-abundance.” It concludes with observations concerning the post-TrafFix functionality doctrine and suggestions for improving its ...


Confusion Codified: Why Trademark Remedies Make No Sense, Mark A. Thurmon 2016 Southern University Law Center

Confusion Codified: Why Trademark Remedies Make No Sense, Mark A. Thurmon

Journal of Intellectual Property Law

No abstract provided.


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