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An Imminent Substantial Disruption: Towards A Uniform Standard For Balancing The Rights Of Students To Speak And The Rights Of Administrators To Discipline., Allison G. Kort 2014 SelectedWorks

An Imminent Substantial Disruption: Towards A Uniform Standard For Balancing The Rights Of Students To Speak And The Rights Of Administrators To Discipline., Allison G. Kort

Allison G Kort

ABSTRACT

An Imminent Substantial Disruption: Toward a Uniform Standard for Balancing the Rights of Students to Speak and the Rights of Administrators to Discipline.

By Allison Kort

Twenty-five years before the Supreme Court’s landmark school speech decision in Tinker v. Des Moines, 393 U.S. 503, 504 (1969), the Court cautioned against placing too much discretion in the hands of school boards. In Tinker, when students wore black armbands to protest the Vietnam War, the Supreme Court determined that student speech may not be censored when the record demonstrates no facts which would reasonably have led school authorities to ...


Removing Disfavored Faces From Facebook: The Freedom Of Speech Implications Of Banning Sex Offenders From Social Media, John Hitz 2014 Maurer School of Law: Indiana University

Removing Disfavored Faces From Facebook: The Freedom Of Speech Implications Of Banning Sex Offenders From Social Media, John Hitz

Indiana Law Journal

This Note scrutinizes the constitutionality of statutes that ban sex offenders who are no longer under any form of probation, parole, or supervised release from using social media. This Note argues that the incarnations of three of the social media ban statutes that have been examined by the federal judiciary were properly found unconstitutional because they violate the free speech rights of the sex offenders that they ban from social media. This Note goes on to argue that states can secure the interests they were seeking to protect in adopting these statutes through other means.

ng what groups of individuals ...


Whistleblowing And Free Speech: Garcetti's Early Progeny And Shrinking Constitutional Rights Of Public Employees, J. Michael McGuinness 2014 Touro College Jacob D. Fuchsberg Law Center

Whistleblowing And Free Speech: Garcetti's Early Progeny And Shrinking Constitutional Rights Of Public Employees, J. Michael Mcguinness

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.


Voting For Balance: The Third Circuit Splits With The Sixth Circuit Over The Press's Right To Access Polling Stations In Pg Publishing Co. V. Aichele, Nicholas S. Lessin 2014 Boston College Law School

Voting For Balance: The Third Circuit Splits With The Sixth Circuit Over The Press's Right To Access Polling Stations In Pg Publishing Co. V. Aichele, Nicholas S. Lessin

Boston College Law Review

In 2013, in PG Publishing Co. v. Aichele, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit applied the experience and logic test to the voting process, contradicting the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit’s previous application of a traditional forum analysis to the voting process in its 2004 Beacon Journal Publishing Co. v. Blackwell decision. This Comment argues that the experience and logic test properly balances the government’s interest in privacy against the public’s interest in access to information. In contrast, applying a traditional forum analysis to the right of access creates ...


Citizens Disunited: Mccutcheon V. Federal Election Commission, Adam Lamparello 2014 SelectedWorks

Citizens Disunited: Mccutcheon V. Federal Election Commission, Adam Lamparello

Adam Lamparello

We have a separate but unequal Constitution. The wealthy are democracy’s darlings, the middle class are its stepchildren, and the poor are its orphans. And the Constitution’s written and unwritten rights are alive for the wealthy, merely evolving for the middle class, and dead for the poor.

One thing, however, should not be disputed: wealthy individuals are entitled to fully enjoy the Constitution’s textual guarantees. Indeed, the notion that Congress—through aggregate limits on individual contributions—may limit the number of candidates to which they can contribute is troubling. But there is a reason. Everyone else—including ...


Bracelets And The Scope Of Student Speech Rights In B.H. Ex Rel. Hawk V. Easton Area School District, Jacquelyn Burke 2014 Boston College Law School

Bracelets And The Scope Of Student Speech Rights In B.H. Ex Rel. Hawk V. Easton Area School District, Jacquelyn Burke

Boston College Journal of Law & Social Justice

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit held that a district wide ban of bracelets containing the word “boobies” was an impermissible restriction of students’ First Amendment speech rights. The majority’s focus on the bracelets’ social message is critical for the preservation of students’ rights to discuss social issues, particularly health issues. Alternatively, Judge Hardiman’s dissent focused on the bracelets’ alleged sexual innuendo and did not give credence to the bracelets’ purpose. Judge Hardiman advocated upholding the ban due to the bracelets’ supposed sexual nature. Had Judge Hardiman prevailed, knowledge and awareness of a vital ...


When Free Exercise Is A Burden: Protecting "Third Parties" In Religious Accommodation Law, Kara Loewentheil 2014 Yale University

When Free Exercise Is A Burden: Protecting "Third Parties" In Religious Accommodation Law, Kara Loewentheil

Kara Loewentheil

During the 2014 U.S. Supreme Court term, the Court considered two challenges to the contraceptive coverage requirement of the Affordable Care Act. These cases attracted enormous attention, and brought a new urgency to the principle that requests for religious accommodations should be weighed against any burdens such accommodations would impose on “third parties,” who are more accurately termed “existing rights-holders.” However, neither courts nor scholars have provided a consistent or principled way of thinking through how to evaluate such burdens and how to weigh them against free exercise rights. This Article takes up that challenge, using the example of ...


Taming The "Feral Beast": Cautionary Lessons From British Press Reform, Lili Levi 2014 University of Miami

Taming The "Feral Beast": Cautionary Lessons From British Press Reform, Lili Levi

Lili Levi

Abstract: As technology undermines the economic model supporting traditional newspapers, power shifts from the watchdog press to those it watches. Worldwide calls for increased press “responsibility” are one result. Pending British press reform provides a troubling example with far-ranging implications for freedom of the press. Under the guise of modest press self-regulation, the U.K. is currently poised to upend 300 years of press freedom via the recently-approved Royal Charter for Self-Regulation of the Press. The Royal Charter was adopted in response to the moral panic engendered by Britain’s tabloid phone-hacking scandal. An example of 20th Century regulation ...


State “Subsidies” And Unnecessary Public Funding: The Texas Legislature’S Successful Restriction Of Constitutional Rights In Department Of Texas V. Texas Lottery Commission, Tyler A. Dever Ms. 2014 SelectedWorks

State “Subsidies” And Unnecessary Public Funding: The Texas Legislature’S Successful Restriction Of Constitutional Rights In Department Of Texas V. Texas Lottery Commission, Tyler A. Dever Ms.

Tyler A Dever Ms.

This Note argues that the Act’s political advocacy restrictions are unconstitutional as applied to the Plaintiffs in Texas Lottery. This Note discusses government subsidies, occupational licenses, and the doctrine of unconstitutional conditions. It then analyzes the charitable organizations’ First Amendment rights in light of the challenged Act. Although this Note argues against the majority’s upholding of the Act, it will also present flaws in the plaintiffs’ argument for injunction and explain why the court may have ruled in favor of the state.


The Basis For Noerr-Pennington Immunity: An Argument Based On Supreme Court Precedent That Federal Antitrust Law Forms The Foundation Of Noerr-Pennington, Not The First Amendment, Michael Pemstein 2014 SelectedWorks

The Basis For Noerr-Pennington Immunity: An Argument Based On Supreme Court Precedent That Federal Antitrust Law Forms The Foundation Of Noerr-Pennington, Not The First Amendment, Michael Pemstein

Michael Pemstein

Under the Noerr-Pennington doctrine defendants are immune from liability for violations of federal antitrust law that result from their efforts to influence the passage or enforcement of laws, even if the laws they advocate for, or their means of advocacy, have anticompetitive effects. Many courts have assumed that the Noerr-Pennington doctrine is based solely on the protections afforded by the First Amendment right to petition and have extended the Noerr-Pennington doctrine to a wide variety of torts outside the antitrust context based on this assumption. This article argues that these courts have failed to recognize that Noerr-Pennington’s protections are ...


Bare Necessities: The Argument For A “Revenge Porn” Exception In Section 230 Immunity, Allison L. Tungate 2014 SelectedWorks

Bare Necessities: The Argument For A “Revenge Porn” Exception In Section 230 Immunity, Allison L. Tungate

Allison L Tungate

No abstract provided.


Does “The Freedom Of The Press” Include A Right To Anonymity? The Original Meaning, Robert G. Natelson 2014 SelectedWorks

Does “The Freedom Of The Press” Include A Right To Anonymity? The Original Meaning, Robert G. Natelson

Robert G. Natelson

This Article examines relevant evidence to determine whether, as some have argued, the original legal force of the First Amendment’s “freedom of the press” included a per se right to anonymous authorship. The Article concludes that, except in cases in which freedom of the press had been abused, it did. Thus, from an originalist point of view, Supreme Court cases such as Buckley v. Valeo and Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, which upheld statutes requiring disclosure of donors to political advertising, were erroneously decided.


God And Guns: The Free Exercise Of Religion Problems Of Regulating Guns In Churches And Other Houses Of Worship, John M. A. DiPippa 2014 SelectedWorks

God And Guns: The Free Exercise Of Religion Problems Of Regulating Guns In Churches And Other Houses Of Worship, John M. A. Dipippa

John M. A. DiPippa

The article demonstrates that the cases raising religious liberty challenges to state regulation of weapons in houses of worship reveal the persistent problems plaguing religious liberty cases. First, these cases illustrate the difficulties non-mainstream religious claims face. Courts may not understand the religious nature of the claim or they may devalue claims that do not seem “normal” or “reasonable.” This is compounded how few religious liberty claimants, especially non-mainstream religions, win their cases. Second, the cases are part of the larger debate about how easy it should be to get judicially imposed religious exemptions from general and neutral laws. Uncritically ...


Evaluating Candidacy Restrictions: The Implications Of New York's Modified Approach, Brian Hodgkinson 2014 Touro College Jacob D. Fuchsberg Law Center

Evaluating Candidacy Restrictions: The Implications Of New York's Modified Approach, Brian Hodgkinson

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.


Curtailing The First Amendment Protection To Discovery, Silvia Durri 2014 Touro College Jacob D. Fuchsberg Law Center

Curtailing The First Amendment Protection To Discovery, Silvia Durri

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Occupy Wall Street Movement And The Constitution: Protestors Preoccupied With The First Amendment, Christine Verbitsky 2014 Touro College Jacob D. Fuchsberg Law Center

The Occupy Wall Street Movement And The Constitution: Protestors Preoccupied With The First Amendment, Christine Verbitsky

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.


Don't Feed The Deer: Misapplications Of Statutory Vagueness And The First Amendment Overbreadth Doctrine, Brian Hodgkinson 2014 Touro College Jacob D. Fuchsberg Law Center

Don't Feed The Deer: Misapplications Of Statutory Vagueness And The First Amendment Overbreadth Doctrine, Brian Hodgkinson

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Professor As Whistleblower: The Tangled World Of Constitutional And Statutory Protections, Jennifer Bard 2014 SelectedWorks

The Professor As Whistleblower: The Tangled World Of Constitutional And Statutory Protections, Jennifer Bard

Jennifer Bard

Like Phil Robertson, the patriarch of the Duck Dynasty family, to Edward Snowden, the NSA leaker, many professors at U.S. colleges and universities are surprised to find how little protection they have from the adverse consequences of their speech. The First Amendment is says nothing about either academic freedom or whistleblowing and it has been left to the Supreme Court to develop a doctrine as to when and if a professor’s speech is entitled to Constitutional Protection. This article considers the broad topic of protection for speech by professors other than that directly related to the views they ...


When Art Becomes Free: On Artistic In-Expression & Personal Convictions, Amir H. Khoury 2014 SelectedWorks

When Art Becomes Free: On Artistic In-Expression & Personal Convictions, Amir H. Khoury

Amir Khoury

In this paper I argue that just as there are moral rights in copyright law, which secure attribution and integrity, so too, there should be 'inverse' moral rights that can protect artists from being impelled or compelled to create in the first place. This research comes against the backdrop of one of the most contentious issues in the Western world today, that pertaining to same-sex marriage. But the discussion applies to all other fields where creativity finds itself in a battle over personal convictions. In my view, the inverse moral rights construct is the true reflection of the extent of ...


Regulating Mass Surveillance As Privacy Pollution: Learning From Environmental Impact Statements, A. Michael Froomkin 2014 SelectedWorks

Regulating Mass Surveillance As Privacy Pollution: Learning From Environmental Impact Statements, A. Michael Froomkin

A. Michael Froomkin

US law has remarkably little to say about mass surveillance in public, a failure which has allowed the surveillance to grow at an alarming rate – a rate that is only set to increase. This article proposes ‘Privacy Impact Notices’ (PINs) — modeled on Environmental Impact Statements — as an initial solution to this problem.

Data collection in public (and in the home via public spaces) resembles an externality imposed on the person whose privacy is reduced involuntarily; it can also be seen as a market failure caused by an information asymmetry. Current doctrinal legal tools available to respond to the deployment of ...


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