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Shut Up: Pay More: This What You Voted For. Why You Don't See Me At San Francisco's Hall Of Justice, David D. Butler 2015 David D.Butler, PLC, Lawyer

Shut Up: Pay More: This What You Voted For. Why You Don't See Me At San Francisco's Hall Of Justice, David D. Butler

David D. Butler

Urban violence, much of it politically motivated, has driven the taxpaying Middle Class into the suburbs. This has left only the tax eating poor and the tax avoiding rich in the big cities. This has resulted in urban bankruptcy in Detroit and even in California with its gifts of the technological Gold Rush, the Pacific Ocean, and the Sierra Nevada and Santa Lucia Mountains. The poor are more issolated than ever confined to the functional equivalent of no go zones. They speak a differenct language, dress differently, and sell drugs until they are caught and caged, providing good pay and ...


Continuing The Constitutional Dialogue: A Discussion On Justice Stevens's Establishment Clause And Free Exercise Jurisprudence, Alan Brownstein 2015 Northwestern University School of Law

Continuing The Constitutional Dialogue: A Discussion On Justice Stevens's Establishment Clause And Free Exercise Jurisprudence, Alan Brownstein

Northwestern University Law Review

No abstract provided.


A Fixture On A Changing Court: Justice Stevens And The Establishment Clause, Erwin Chemerinsky 2015 Northwestern University School of Law

A Fixture On A Changing Court: Justice Stevens And The Establishment Clause, Erwin Chemerinsky

Northwestern University Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Doctrine Of True Threats: Protecting Our Ever-Shrinking First Amendment Rights In The New Era Of Communication, Mary M. Roark 2015 University of Mississippi Main Campus

The Doctrine Of True Threats: Protecting Our Ever-Shrinking First Amendment Rights In The New Era Of Communication, Mary M. Roark

Mary M Roark

The First Amendment provides that “Congress shall make no law . . . abridging the freedom of speech.” Such protection has withstood the test of time and is heralded as one of our most precious rights as Americans. “The hallmark of the protection of free speech is to allow ‘free trade in ideas’—even ideas that the overwhelming majority of people might find distasteful or discomforting." However, “[t]here are certain well-defined and narrowly limited classes of speech, the prevention and punishment of which has never been thought to raise any Constitutional problem."

One such proscribable form of speech is the “true threat ...


Cracking Open The Classroom Door: Developing A First Amendment Standard For Curricular Speech, Nicholas K. Tygesson 2015 Northwestern University School of Law

Cracking Open The Classroom Door: Developing A First Amendment Standard For Curricular Speech, Nicholas K. Tygesson

Northwestern University Law Review

No abstract provided.


“Camels Agree With Your Throat” And Other Lies: Why Graphic Warnings Are Necessary To Prevent Consumer Deception, Ellen English 2015 University of Florida Levin College of Law

“Camels Agree With Your Throat” And Other Lies: Why Graphic Warnings Are Necessary To Prevent Consumer Deception, Ellen English

Florida Law Review

The government’s latest attempt to protect consumers from the perils of tobacco use is in jeopardy. In 2009, Congress enacted the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act, which requires cigarette advertisements and packages to bear nine new textual health warnings and gives the FDA authority to regulate tobacco products. In 2011, in compliance with the Act, the FDA issued a regulation, known as the graphic warning requirement, which mandates that a color graphic image accompany each of the nine textual warning statements. The graphic warning requirement now faces challenges from the tobacco industry, and the ambiguities current standards ...


Dogging Darwin: America's Revolt Against The Teaching Of Evolution, J. Herbie DiFonzo, Ruth C. Stern 2015 Hofstra University Law School

Dogging Darwin: America's Revolt Against The Teaching Of Evolution, J. Herbie Difonzo, Ruth C. Stern

J. Herbie DiFonzo

Abstract

More than four in ten Americans believe that God created humans in their present form 10,000 years ago. American antagonism toward the teaching of evolution is deeply rooted in fundamentalist tradition and an aversion to intellectualism. These forces have combined to demonize Charles Darwin to such an extent that sectarian-based legal and political attacks on evolution show no signs of abating. Darwin’s day in court began in 1925 with the famous Scopes Monkey Trial. It continued into the 21st century with Kitzmiller v. Dover Area Schools. Throughout, the core creationist agenda has remained the same, although ...


Doe V. Elmbrook School District And The Importance Of Refocusing Establishment Clause Jurisprudence, Julie M. Karaba 2015 Northwestern University School of Law

Doe V. Elmbrook School District And The Importance Of Refocusing Establishment Clause Jurisprudence, Julie M. Karaba

Northwestern University Law Review

No abstract provided.


Free Exercise Reconceived: The Logic And Limits Of Hosanna-Tabor, Christopher C. Lund 2015 Northwestern University School of Law

Free Exercise Reconceived: The Logic And Limits Of Hosanna-Tabor, Christopher C. Lund

Northwestern University Law Review

Two terms ago, in Hosanna-Tabor Evangelical Lutheran Church & School v. EEOC, the Supreme Court held that the First Amendment precludes ministers from bringing employment-related claims against their churches. In some ways, Hosanna-Tabor changed little. The lower courts had all reached that conclusion already, though the Supreme Court slightly expanded the breadth of the so-called ministerial exception. More important is how Hosanna-Tabor reconceptualized things, especially in how it pushed back somewhat against the Supreme Court’s imperial decision in Employment Division v. Smith, where the Court had broadly held that the Free Exercise Clause did not entitle religious believers to exemptions ...


Speaker Discrimination: The Next Frontier Of Free Speech, Michael Kagan 2015 University of Nevada, Las Vegas -- William S. Boyd School of Law

Speaker Discrimination: The Next Frontier Of Free Speech, Michael Kagan

Scholarly Works

Citizens United v. FEC articulated a new pillar of free speech doctrine that is independent from the well-known controversies about corporate personhood and the role of money in elections. For the first time, the Supreme Court clearly said that discrimination on the basis of the identity of the speaker offends the First Amendment. Previously, the focus of free speech doctrine had been on the content and forum of speech, not on the identity of the speaker. This new doctrine has the potential to reshape free speech law far beyond the corporate speech and campaign finance contexts. This article explores the ...


Corporate Piety And Impropriety: Hobby Lobby's Extension Of Rfra Rights To For-Profit Corporations, Amy Sepinwall 2015 Legal Studies & Business Ethics/Wharton University of Pennsylvania

Corporate Piety And Impropriety: Hobby Lobby's Extension Of Rfra Rights To For-Profit Corporations, Amy Sepinwall

Amy J. Sepinwall

In Burwell v. Hobby Lobby, the Supreme Court held, for the first time, that the Religious Freedom Restoration Act (RFRA) applied to for-profit corporations and, on that basis, it allowed Hobby Lobby to omit otherwise mandated contraceptive coverage from its employee healthcare package. Critics argue that the Court’s novel expansion of corporate rights is fundamentally inconsistent with the basic principles of corporate law. In particular, they contend that the decision ignores the fact that the corporation, as an artificial entity, cannot exercise religion in its own right, and they decry the notion that the law might look through the ...


Free Expression, In-Group Bias, And The Court's Conservatives: A Critique Of The Epstein-Parker-Segal Study, Todd E. Pettys 2015 University of Iowa College of Law

Free Expression, In-Group Bias, And The Court's Conservatives: A Critique Of The Epstein-Parker-Segal Study, Todd E. Pettys

Todd E. Pettys

In a recent, widely publicized study, a prestigious team of political scientists concluded that there is strong evidence of ideological in-group bias among the Supreme Court’s members in First Amendment free-expression cases, with the current four most conservative justices being the Roberts Court’s worst offenders. Beneath the surface of the authors’ conclusions, however, one finds a surprisingly sizable combination of coding errors, superficial case readings, and questionable judgments about litigants’ ideological affiliations. Many of those problems likely flow either from shortcomings that reportedly afflict the Supreme Court Database (the data set that nearly always provides the starting point ...


Religious Associations: Hosanna-Tabor And The Instrumental Value Of Religious Groups, Ashutosh Bhagwat 2015 UC Davis School of Law

Religious Associations: Hosanna-Tabor And The Instrumental Value Of Religious Groups, Ashutosh Bhagwat

Washington University Law Review

In its 2012 decision in Hosanna-Tabor Evangelical Lutheran Church and School v. EEOC, the Supreme Court held that the Religion Clauses of the First Amendment require recognition of a “ministerial exception” to general antidiscrimination statutes (in that case, the ADA), because religious institutions must have autonomy in selecting their ministers. In the course of its analysis, however, the Court made a very interesting move. In response to the government’s argument that the case could be resolved under the general First Amendment right of association, the Court responded that this position was “untenable,” and indeed “remarkable,” because the very existence ...


Epilogue: Moral Panics And Body Cameras, Howard M. Wasserman 2015 FIU College of Law

Epilogue: Moral Panics And Body Cameras, Howard M. Wasserman

Washington University Law Review Commentaries

This brief follow-up to Moral Panics and Body Cameras comments on in the weeks after that essay was published on the Commentaries website and what those events show about the efficacy of body cameras and video evidence as a response to police-public conflicts.


The Rising None: Marsh, Galloway, And The End Of Legislative Prayer, Nicholas C. Roberts 2015 Indiana University Maurer School of Law

The Rising None: Marsh, Galloway, And The End Of Legislative Prayer, Nicholas C. Roberts

Indiana Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Constitutional Law – First Amendment And Freedom Of Speech – The Constitutionality Of Arkansas’S Prohibition On Political Robocalls, Caleb J. Norris 2014 University of Arkansas at Little Rock William H. Bowen School of Law

Constitutional Law – First Amendment And Freedom Of Speech – The Constitutionality Of Arkansas’S Prohibition On Political Robocalls, Caleb J. Norris

University of Arkansas at Little Rock Law Review

The note first discusses the pros and cons of robocalls, concluding that certain restrictions on robocalls are desirable. Next, the note examines current constitutional case law governing the issue. Thereafter, the note illustrates how Arkansas's regulation on political robocalls would fail a First Amendment challenge as currently written. Accordingly, the note proposes a revision to the robocall statute that would most likely allow it to pass constitutional review.

The note concludes that the burdens resulting from robocalls are placed upon robocall recipients, opposing political campaigns (especially those that determine not to use them under current law), and unrelated third ...


Court Of Appeals Of New York, Watson V. State Commission On Judicial Conduct, Denise Shanley 2014 Touro College Jacob D. Fuchsberg Law Center

Court Of Appeals Of New York, Watson V. State Commission On Judicial Conduct, Denise Shanley

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.


First Amendment Decisions - 2002 Term, Joel Gora 2014 Touro College Jacob D. Fuchsberg Law Center

First Amendment Decisions - 2002 Term, Joel Gora

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.


Supreme Court, Appellate Term, First Department, People V. Bull, Randi Schwartz 2014 Touro College Jacob D. Fuchsberg Law Center

Supreme Court, Appellate Term, First Department, People V. Bull, Randi Schwartz

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Legal Definition Of Religion: From Eating Cat Food To White Supremacy, Jane M. Ritter 2014 Touro College Jacob D. Fuchsberg Law Center

The Legal Definition Of Religion: From Eating Cat Food To White Supremacy, Jane M. Ritter

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.


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