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The Holy Grail? Designing And Teaching An Integrated Doctrine And Drafting Course, Claire C. Robinson May 2018 Cleveland-Marshall College of Law, Cleveland State University

The Holy Grail? Designing And Teaching An Integrated Doctrine And Drafting Course, Claire C. Robinson May

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

I’ve long considered teaching doctrine and skills together in a single course to be the holy grail of legal education. If we could do so successfully, we might make significant strides in providing a legal education that better prepares our students to be practicing lawyers. In spring 2016, my colleague Professor April Cherry and I took the plunge and collaboratively offered a course titled Estates and Trusts: Doctrine and Drafting at our institution, Cleveland-Marshall College of Law. This essay describes our experience and lessons learned pursuing the holy grail.


In Re Connell Living Trust, 134 Nev. Adv. Op. 73 (Sep. 13, 2018) (En Banc), Pengxiang Tian 2018 University of Nevada, Las Vegas -- William S. Boyd School of Law

In Re Connell Living Trust, 134 Nev. Adv. Op. 73 (Sep. 13, 2018) (En Banc), Pengxiang Tian

Nevada Supreme Court Summaries

The Court determined that a no-contest clause in a trust does not foreclose a beneficiary’s interest if the beneficiary, acting as the trustee, breaches his or her fiduciary duty.


Community Property V. Contracts: A Domestic Conflict Of Law Being Waged By The Washington Wife, Eldon H. Reiley 2018 Gonzaga University School of Law

Community Property V. Contracts: A Domestic Conflict Of Law Being Waged By The Washington Wife, Eldon H. Reiley

Gonzaga Law Review

No abstract provided.


Equitable Relief For Erisa Benefit Plan Designation Mistakes, Raymond C. O'Brien 2018 The Catholic University of America, Columbus School of Law

Equitable Relief For Erisa Benefit Plan Designation Mistakes, Raymond C. O'Brien

Catholic University Law Review

Since its enactment in 1974, the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA) and related insurance and disability programs provided retirement security for employees and employers, amassing more than $9 trillion in protected assets. Congress preempted conflicting state laws so as to promote certainty of distribution and ease of administration, two hallmarks of ERISA-governed plans. Nonetheless, since 1974, American society embraced spousal equality, an increased number of marriages end in divorce, and wealth most often passes through nonprobate transfers such as insurance contracts and pension policy plans. To accommodate these societal and wealth changes, states enacted statutes to provide elective share ...


The Rise Of Fiduciary Law, Tamar Frankel 2018 Boston University School of Law

The Rise Of Fiduciary Law, Tamar Frankel

Faculty Scholarship

The law that defines and regulates fiduciary relationships appears in many legal areas, such as family law, surrogate decision-making, international law, agency law, employment law, pension law, remedies rules, banking law, financial institutions' regulation, corporate law, charities law not for profit organizations law, and the law concerning medical services.

Fiduciary relationships, and the concepts on which they are grounded, appear not only in the law. They appear in other areas of knowledge: economics, psychology; moral norms and pluralism. Fiduciary law has a very long history. It was recognized in Roman law and the British common law and appeared decades ago ...


The New Family Freedom, Emily J. Stolzenberg 2018 Columbia Law School

The New Family Freedom, Emily J. Stolzenberg

Boston College Law Review

In family law, “autonomy” has traditionally meant freedom from state interference in one’s intimate life. This Article describes an emergent, libertarian vision of autonomy as property rights that also demands freedom from other family members. This conception, “choice about obligations,” holds redistribution of resources between intimates to be illegitimate unless the richer party “chose” to take on financial obligations ex ante by ceremonially marrying or formally contracting. But as more people conduct their intimate lives outside these legal institutions, choice about obligations increasingly collides with another, more fundamental, family law principle: the imperative to “privatize dependency,” i.e., to ...


From Waqf, Ancestor Worship To The Rise Of The Global Trust: A History Of The Use Of The Trust As A Vehicle For Wealth Transfer In Singapore, Hang Wu TANG 2018 Singapore Management University

From Waqf, Ancestor Worship To The Rise Of The Global Trust: A History Of The Use Of The Trust As A Vehicle For Wealth Transfer In Singapore, Hang Wu Tang

Research Collection School Of Law

This Article focuses on the migration of English trust law to Singapore and its past and present uses in relation to wealth transfer through the ages. In Singapore, trust law arrived together with the corpus of English law. Unlike criminal law, which was influenced by Indian codes promulgated by the English in British India, trust law was received into Singapore directly from England.


A Pro Debtor And Majority Approach To The "Automatic Stay" Provision Of The Bankruptcy Code—In Re Cowen Incorrectly Decided, Claudia A. Restrepo 2018 Boston College Law School

A Pro Debtor And Majority Approach To The "Automatic Stay" Provision Of The Bankruptcy Code—In Re Cowen Incorrectly Decided, Claudia A. Restrepo

Boston College Law Review

On February 27, 2017, in In re Cowen, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit held that only affirmative actions to either obtain possession or exercise control over property of the bankruptcy estate constitute violations of the automatic stay provision. In doing so, the court concluded that the passive retention of an asset that was acquired pre-petition was not a violation of the automatic stay, and that the creditor had no obligation to relinquish the asset to the bankruptcy estate. This Comment argues that the Tenth Circuit misinterpreted the automatic stay provision of the Bankruptcy Code, disregarding ...


Keep Suing All The Lawyers: Recent Developments In Claims Against Lawyers For Aiding & Abetting A Client’S Breach Of Fiduciary Duty, Katerina P. Lewinbuk 2018 South texas College of Law

Keep Suing All The Lawyers: Recent Developments In Claims Against Lawyers For Aiding & Abetting A Client’S Breach Of Fiduciary Duty, Katerina P. Lewinbuk

St. Mary's Journal on Legal Malpractice & Ethics

Lawyers have increasingly become subject to liability under various legal theories, ranging from traditional legal malpractice or negligence liability claims to various third-party actions. Most recently, state and federal courts across the country have recognized attorney liability for aiding and abetting a client’s breach of fiduciary duty. This Article will address the current status of the cause of action for a lawyer’s aiding and abetting her client’s breach of fiduciary duty, explain the commonalities and distinguish nuances as outlined by particular states, examine recent decisions by federal courts that have recognized the cause of action, and culminate ...


The Limited Duties Of Lawyers To Protect The Funds And Property Of Nonclients, Vincent R. Johnson 2018 St. Mary's University School of Law

The Limited Duties Of Lawyers To Protect The Funds And Property Of Nonclients, Vincent R. Johnson

St. Mary's Journal on Legal Malpractice & Ethics

Issues arise daily in law practice about the duties owed by lawyers to nonclients with respect to funds or property entrusted to them. In resolving those issues, care must be exercised when interpreting state versions of Model Rule 1.15, the American Bar Association’s pattern ethics rule on safekeeping of funds and property. Otherwise, a lawyer’s duties to third persons may too readily encroach on the performance of obligations owed to clients, as well as on the legitimate interests of lawyers themselves.

As numerous authorities have recognized, lawyers are obliged to protect the property interests of third persons ...


Borrowing In The Shadow Of Death: Another Look At Probate Lending, David Horton 2018 College of William & Mary Law School

Borrowing In The Shadow Of Death: Another Look At Probate Lending, David Horton

William & Mary Law Review

“Fringe” lending has long been controversial. Three decades ago, demand for subprime credit soared, and businesses started to offer high-interest rate cash advances, such as tax refund anticipation loans, payday loans, and pension loans. These products have sparked intense debate and are subject to a maze of rules.

However, in Probate Lending, published in the Yale Law Journal, a coauthor and I examined a form of fringe lending that has gone largely unnoticed: firms that pay lump sums in return for an heir or beneficiary’s interest in a pending decedent’s estate. Capitalizing on a California law that requires ...


A Social Welfare Theory Of Inheritance Regulation, Mark Glover 2018 SJ Quinney College of Law, University of Utah

A Social Welfare Theory Of Inheritance Regulation, Mark Glover

Utah Law Review

The law of succession grants donors broad freedom to decide how to distribute their property upon death. It does so in hopes of increasing social welfare in two general ways. First, freedom of disposition generates socially beneficial estate planning decisions. In particular, donors are in the best position to evaluate their own specific circumstances and to make decisions that, on the whole, produce the greatest utility from the transfer of their estates. Second, the donor’s autonomy over estate planning decisions incentivizes socially beneficial behavior, such as productivity during the life of the donor. Because the law views freedom of ...


Navajo Nation V. Department Of The Interior, Jaclyn R. Van Natta 2018 Alexander Blewett III School of Law at the University of Montana

Navajo Nation V. Department Of The Interior, Jaclyn R. Van Natta

Public Land & Resources Law Review

In Navajo Nation v. Department of the Interior, the Navajo Nation challenged the Department of the Interior’s 2001 and 2008 water allocation guidelines and asserted that under NEPA and the APA the guidelines violated the Navajo Nation’s water rights. The Navajo Nation also asserted a breach of trust claim against the United States. After nearly a decade of attempted settlement negotiations, the Navajo Nation reasserted its complaints. The District Court for the District of Arizona denied the Navajo Nation’s motions, and the Navajo Nation appealed to the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals, which determined the Navajo Nation ...


Using Empirical Studies As A Basis For Updating Intestacy Laws, Sergio Pareja 2018 The University of New Mexico School of Law

Using Empirical Studies As A Basis For Updating Intestacy Laws, Sergio Pareja

Sergio Pareja

The principal goal of any intestacy statute is to determine the probable intent of individuals who die without a will. Professor Wright and Ms. Sterner analyze 493 wills that were probated in Escambia and Alachua Counties, Florida, in 2013. This blog post reviews their study as well as Wright and Sterner's final analysis. Pareja adds, new statutes, if properly considered, should pay attention to gender, race, and class differences that surfaced in the authors’ study


Using Empirical Studies As A Basis For Updating Intestacy Laws, Sergio Pareja 2018 The University of New Mexico School of Law

Using Empirical Studies As A Basis For Updating Intestacy Laws, Sergio Pareja

Faculty Scholarship

The principal goal of any intestacy statute is to determine the probable intent of individuals who die without a will. Professor Wright and Ms. Sterner analyze 493 wills that were probated in Escambia and Alachua Counties, Florida, in 2013. This blog post reviews their study as well as Wright and Sterner's final analysis. Pareja adds, new statutes, if properly considered, should pay attention to gender, race, and class differences that surfaced in the authors’ study


Promoting Retirement Security For Low-Income Workers In Illinois: An Analysis And Lessons For Other States, Philip C. Aka, Chidera V. Oku, Murna Habila 2018 The University of Akron

Promoting Retirement Security For Low-Income Workers In Illinois: An Analysis And Lessons For Other States, Philip C. Aka, Chidera V. Oku, Murna Habila

Akron Law Review

This Article makes suggestions for promoting retirement security among low-income workers in Illinois with pointed lessons for workers in other U.S. states. Adapting a framework from a previous study by the principal author, the Article portrays retirement preparedness for low-income workers in Illinois as a function of changes in Social Security, employer-sponsored pensions, and personal assets—the famed “three-legged stool” of retirement income—synchronized with reduction of disparities between socioeconomic groups in education, healthcare, and housing. Many studies on retirement security focus excessively on the national level sometimes at the expense of the subnational phenomena that complicate retirement security ...


Discretionary Trusts: An Update, Richard C. Ausness 2018 University of Kentucky College of Law

Discretionary Trusts: An Update, Richard C. Ausness

Law Faculty Scholarly Articles

In the past, settlors tended to limit a trustee’s discretion by setting forth a specific formula for the distribution of trust assets. Nowadays, however, settlors often prefer to vest more discretion in their trustees. This is partly due to the fact that beneficiaries tend to live longer and, therefore, trusts inevitably last longer, thereby requiring trustees to respond to changing conditions. In addition, settlors often believe that vesting increased discretion on the part of trustees will discourage beneficiaries from bringing expensive and disruptive challenges to their decisions.

Nevertheless, the trend toward increased discretion is not without its problems. First ...


Equitable Relief For Erisa Benefit Plan Designation Mistakes, Raymond C. O'Brien 2018 The Catholic University of America, Columbus School of Law

Equitable Relief For Erisa Benefit Plan Designation Mistakes, Raymond C. O'Brien

Scholarly Articles and Other Contributions

Since its enactment in 1974, the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA) and related insurance and disability programs provided retirement security for employees and employers, amassing more than $9 trillion in protected assets. Congress preempted conflicting state laws so as to promote certainty of distribution and ease of administration, two hallmarks of ERISA-governed plans. Nonetheless, since 1974, American society embraced spousal equality, an increased number of marriages end in divorce, and wealth most often passes through nonprobate transfers such as insurance contracts and pension policy plans. To accommodate these societal and wealth changes, states enacted statutes to provide elective share ...


The Madness Of Insane Delusions, Kevin Bennardo 2018 University of North Carolina School of Law

The Madness Of Insane Delusions, Kevin Bennardo

Faculty Publications

This Article shares two ideas for reform of the law surrounding testators' expressed preferences and the doctrine of insane delusions.

First, the doctrine of insane delusions should not be applied to devises that seek to advance beliefs, ideas, or viewpoints. There is just too great of a risk that judges and juries will strike down such devises when the testator’s viewpoints diverge from their own.

Second, the time may have come to admit that the law of wills is not as committed to the principle of testamentary freedom as it is often espoused to be. The literature is rife ...


Change Is Constant In Estate Planning: Reflections Of An Actec Law Journal Editor, Bridget J. Crawford 2018 Pace University School of Law

Change Is Constant In Estate Planning: Reflections Of An Actec Law Journal Editor, Bridget J. Crawford

Pace Law Faculty Publications

Change is the only constant in the life of a trusts and estates professional. The law changes; the needs of clients change; the methods for achieving certain results change; technology and modes of communication change. So, too, it can be said that change is the only constant running through more than forty years of our organization's flagship publication.


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