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Of Brutal Murder And Transcendental Sovereignty: The Meaning Of Vested Private Rights, Adam MacLeod 2017 Faulkner University

Of Brutal Murder And Transcendental Sovereignty: The Meaning Of Vested Private Rights, Adam Macleod

Adam MacLeod

The idea of vested private rights is divisive; it divides those who practice law from those who teach and think about law. On one side of the divide, practicing lawyers act as though (at least some) rights exist and exert binding obligation upon private persons and government officials. On the other side of the divide, scholars of law and jurisprudence have generally proceeded, since at least the rise of English positivism in the nineteenth century and the American legal realist movement in the early twentieth, as if the concept of vested right has little real meaning. This article attempts to ...


The Judge And His Clerks, Barbara F. Riegelhaupt, Kaighn Smith Jr., J. Peter Byrne 2017 University of Maine School of Law

The Judge And His Clerks, Barbara F. Riegelhaupt, Kaighn Smith Jr., J. Peter Byrne

Maine Law Review

In his memoir, Life and Times in the Three Branches, Judge Coffin recounts the history of the institution of the law clerk and observes, “I was the first such creature Maine had seen.” He served as a clerk from April 1947 to June 1949 for United States District Court Judge John D. Clifford, working in the same chambers that he would later inhabit as a judge. Over the course of his more than four decades on the Court of Appeals, Judge Coffin would have sixty-eight clerks of his own. Those of us lucky enough to be in that family of ...


The Speeches Of Frank M. Coffin: A Sideline To Judging, Daniel E. Wathen, Barbara Riegelhaupt 2017 University of Maine School of Law

The Speeches Of Frank M. Coffin: A Sideline To Judging, Daniel E. Wathen, Barbara Riegelhaupt

Maine Law Review

The Authors of this Article are engaged in a separate project to publish the full collection of law-related speeches delivered by Judge Coffin during his tenure on the bench. That collection in its entirety consists of more than 125 speeches, and it is a treasure trove of thoughts on the judiciary as an institution, the law, judging, the legal profession, legal education, and legal luminaries past and present. The speeches are also worthy of study purely as examples of communication, advocacy, speechcraft, composition, humor, and whimsy. Within the confines of this Article, the modest goal is to provide samples of ...


In His Own Words: Judge Coffin And Workability, William C. Kelly Jr. 2017 University of Maine School of Law

In His Own Words: Judge Coffin And Workability, William C. Kelly Jr.

Maine Law Review

Early in his judicial career, Judge Coffin proffered the concept of “workability” as one of the core factors in judging. Justice and Workability: Un Essai, his first published reflection on this idea, appeared in the Suffolk University Law Review in 1971. To frame the discussion, he started with a formal definition: “[T]he extent to which a rule protecting a right, enforcing a duty, or setting a standard of conduct—which is consistent with and in the interests of social justice—can be pronounced with reasonable expectation of effective observance without impairing the essential functioning of those to whom the ...


The Ways Of A Judge And On Appeal, Kermit V. Lipez 2017 University of Maine School of Law

The Ways Of A Judge And On Appeal, Kermit V. Lipez

Maine Law Review

What do you do when your judicial hero, the author of two important books on appellate judging, was for many years your neighbor, friend, colleague, and mentor? You revel in your good fortune, and you share your admiration for his books. Judge Coffin’s long involvement in the political world contributed significantly to a primary focus of his two books on appellate judging, The Ways of a Judge, published in 1980, and On Appeal, published in 1994. As a political organizer, a candidate for public office, a Congressman, and an administrator in a federal agency, Judge Coffin understood his accountability ...


Coffin's Court: A Colleague's View, Levin Campbell 2017 University of Maine School of Law

Coffin's Court: A Colleague's View, Levin Campbell

Maine Law Review

These reminiscences focus on the eleven years, from 1972 to 1983, that Frank M. Coffin of Maine was the Chief Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the First Circuit. While Coffin’s judicial career extended over more than forty years, I chose this period because it was a time when his influence over the court’s work was at its peak, as well as because he himself later singled it out as a “judicial Garden of Eden,” during which the First Circuit enjoyed its status as the last remaining three-judge federal court of appeals in the nation.


Frank Morey Coffin's Political Years: Prelude To A Judgeship, Donald E. Nicoll 2017 University of Maine School of Law

Frank Morey Coffin's Political Years: Prelude To A Judgeship, Donald E. Nicoll

Maine Law Review

Each day when I go to my study, I see a wood block print of two owls gazing at me with unblinking eyes. Ever alert, they remind me of the artist, who in his neat, fine hand, titled the print “Deux Hiboux,” inscribed it to the recipients and signed it simply “FMC 8-2-87.” In addition to his talents as an artist and friend in all seasons, FMC was a remarkable public servant in all three branches of the federal government and, with his friend and colleague Edmund S. Muskie, a creative political reformer for the State of Maine. Throughout his ...


Frank Coffin And Enlightened Governance, Robert A. Katzmann 2017 University of Maine School of Law

Frank Coffin And Enlightened Governance, Robert A. Katzmann

Maine Law Review

I have often thought that Judge Frank M. Coffin is one of a handful of statesmen of recent times I could easily imagine in Philadelphia in the summer of 1787 (indeed, as a central figure in a David McCollough biography). If he had been, as competing factions struggled to find solutions to thorny issues, Madison’s Notes would inevitably and often have recorded: “With negotiations on the verge of collapse, all eyes turned to Frank Coffin, who found not only the key to compromise, but also the better way.”


The Legacy Of Judge Frank M. Coffin, Peter R. Pitegoff 2017 University of Maine School of Law

The Legacy Of Judge Frank M. Coffin, Peter R. Pitegoff

Maine Law Review

Judge Coffin had adopted the University of Maine School of Law as if it were his own. He was a committed friend to the Law School and served on the advisory Board of Visitors for almost two decades. Like so many others, I felt his keen personal commitment as well, with his periodic calls and visits, his steady counsel and encouragement. Before arriving in Maine, I had known of Judge Coffin. Little did I anticipate that he would so enrich my experience as Dean at Maine Law. He remains a role model to so many of our graduates and leaves ...


Textualism And The Problem Of Scrivener's Error, John David Ohlendorf 2017 University of Maine School of Law

Textualism And The Problem Of Scrivener's Error, John David Ohlendorf

Maine Law Review

Scrivener’s errors make easy prey for the gentle comedy of the bench and bar, much in the way that typographical errors in billboards, newspaper headlines, and church bulletins form an endless source of humor for late night talk show hosts. But theorists of legal interpretation have long seen that scrivener’s errors pose a more serious problem. The doctrine surrounding scrivener’s error stands considered as something of a cousin to the absurdity doctrine, which has roots extending to the earliest days of the American Republic. More recently, the post-legal-process revival of formalist approaches to statutory interpretation on the ...


Of Law And Other Artificial Normative Systems, Mitchell N. Berman 2017 University of Pennsylvania Law School

Of Law And Other Artificial Normative Systems, Mitchell N. Berman

Faculty Scholarship

Different theories of law are situated within different pictures of our normative landscape. This essay aims to make more visible and attractive one picture that reflects basic positivist sensibilities yet is oddly marginalized in the current jurisprudential literature. The picture that I have in mind tries to vindicate surface appearances. It maintains that the social world is densely populated by countless normative systems of human construction (“artificial normative systems”) whose core functions are to generate and maintain norms (oughts, obligations, powers, rights, prohibitions, and the like). The norms that these systems output are conceptually independent from each other, and may ...


A Christian Jurisprudence, John Kuhn Bleimaier 2017 St. John's University School of Law

A Christian Jurisprudence, John Kuhn Bleimaier

The Catholic Lawyer

No abstract provided.


A Jurisprudence Of Faith: An Experiment In Using Theology To Interpret Jurisprudence, Timothy L. Fort 2017 St. John's University School of Law

A Jurisprudence Of Faith: An Experiment In Using Theology To Interpret Jurisprudence, Timothy L. Fort

The Catholic Lawyer

No abstract provided.


From Eternity To Here: In Search Of The Origins Of Secularism, Nomi Stolzenberg 2017 BLR

From Eternity To Here: In Search Of The Origins Of Secularism, Nomi Stolzenberg

University of Southern California Legal Studies Working Paper Series

This article puts forth a hypothesis about the theological origins of liberalism and secularism that offers an alternative to standard accounts of the intellectual origins/theological foundations of liberalism and of political theology which see the two as separate and mutually exclusive. On my hypothesis, the emergency theory of the state associated with political theology and the liberal theory of the state are (or were at their point of origin) the same thing. The hypothesis is that the theory that the state must be secular (and must be founded on principles of due process and religious pluralism, which come to ...


A New Jurisprudential Aspect Of Antisocial Personality Disorder In Relation To Marriage, Reverend Augustine Mendonca 2017 St. John's University School of Law

A New Jurisprudential Aspect Of Antisocial Personality Disorder In Relation To Marriage, Reverend Augustine Mendonca

The Catholic Lawyer

No abstract provided.


Toward A Theory Of Judicial Decisionmaking: A Synthesis Of Ideologist Jurisprudence And Doctrinalism, Raymond A. Belliotti 2017 St. John's University School of Law

Toward A Theory Of Judicial Decisionmaking: A Synthesis Of Ideologist Jurisprudence And Doctrinalism, Raymond A. Belliotti

The Catholic Lawyer

No abstract provided.


The Process Of Responsible Decision: Observations On The Jurisprudence Of Professor Jones, Edward N. Peters 2017 St. John's University School of Law

The Process Of Responsible Decision: Observations On The Jurisprudence Of Professor Jones, Edward N. Peters

The Catholic Lawyer

No abstract provided.


The Symmetry Principle, Bradley A. Areheart 2017 University of Tennessee College of Law

The Symmetry Principle, Bradley A. Areheart

Boston College Law Review

Title VII provides symmetrical protection against discrimination in that both blacks and whites, and men and women may avail themselves of the law’s protections. In contrast, the Age Discrimination in Employment Act operates asymmetrically, shielding workers over the age of forty from discrimination yet offering no reciprocal protection for younger workers. Why do some antidiscrimination laws protect symmetrically while others do not? More importantly, why does this design choice matter? These are questions that scholars, courts, and legislators have generally ignored. This Article proceeds in two parts. First, it identifies symmetry as an important, yet frequently overlooked, way in ...


Understanding The Public Trust Doctrine Through Due Process, Michael O'Loughlin 2017 Boston College Law School

Understanding The Public Trust Doctrine Through Due Process, Michael O'Loughlin

Boston College Law Review

The public trust doctrine (“PTD”) could be a powerful tool for environmental lawyers. It protects the public’s right to use and access resources by placing them in trust with the state and guiding the sovereign’s discretion in their management. Although it lies inherent in sovereignty, the law scatters it across constitutional, statutory, and common law sources, hurting its effectiveness. Understanding the public’s beneficiary interest in this public trust as a due process protected property right would help resolve these failings by placing it under the umbrella of the U.S. Constitution’s guarantee against arbitrary deprivations of ...


Constitutional Borrowing, Nelson Tebbe, Robert L. Tsai 2017 Brooklyn Law School

Constitutional Borrowing, Nelson Tebbe, Robert L. Tsai

Nelson Tebbe

Borrowing from one domain to promote ideas in another domain is a staple of constitutional decisionmaking. Precedents, arguments, concepts, tropes, and heuristics all can be carried across doctrinal boundaries for purposes of persuasion. Yet the practice itself remains underanalyzed. This Article seeks to bring greater theoretical attention to the matter It defines what constitutional borrowing is and what it is not, presents a typology that describes its common forms, undertakes a principled defense of borrowing, and identifies some of the risks involved. Our examples draw particular attention to places where legal mechanisms and ideas migrate between fields of law associated ...


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