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Corporate Conspiracy: How Not Calling A Conspiracy A Conspiracy Is Warping The Law On Corporate Wrongdoing, Josephine Sandler Nelson 2015 SelectedWorks

Corporate Conspiracy: How Not Calling A Conspiracy A Conspiracy Is Warping The Law On Corporate Wrongdoing, Josephine Sandler Nelson

J.S. Nelson

The intracorporate conspiracy doctrine immunizes an enterprise and its agents from conspiracy prosecution based on the legal fiction that an enterprise and its agents are a single actor incapable of the meeting of two minds to form a conspiracy. The doctrine, however, misplaces incentives in contravention of agency law, criminal law, tort law, and public policy. As a result, harmful behavior is ordered and performed without consequences, and the victims of the behavior suffer without appropriate remedy.

Especially in the wake of the financial crisis, prosecutors and the public are searching for new tools to combat corporate conspiracy. The most ...


Catalogs, Alex Stein, Gideon Parchomovsky 2015 SelectedWorks

Catalogs, Alex Stein, Gideon Parchomovsky

Alex Stein

It is a virtual axiom in the world of law that legal norms come in two prototypes: rules and standards. The accepted lore suggests that rules should be formulated to regulate recurrent and frequent behaviors, whose contours can be defined with sufficient precision. Standards, by contrast, should be employed to address complex, variegated, behaviors that require the weighing of multiple variables. Rules rely on an ex ante perspective and are therefore considered the domain of the legislator; standards embody a preference for ex post, ad-hoc, analysis and are therefore considered the domain of courts. The rules/standards dichotomy has become ...


All Together Now: Using Principles Of Group Dynamics To Train Better Jurors, Sara G. Gordon 2015 University of Nevada, Las Vegas -- William S. Boyd School of Law

All Together Now: Using Principles Of Group Dynamics To Train Better Jurors, Sara G. Gordon

Scholarly Works

We ask juries to make important decisions that have a profound impact on people’s lives. We leave these decisions in the hands of groups of laypeople because we hope that the diverse range of experiences and knowledge in the group will lead to more thoughtful and informed decisionmaking. Studies suggest that diverse groups of jurors have different perspectives on evidence, engage in more thorough debate, and more closely evaluate facts. At the same time, there are a variety of problems associated with group decisionmaking, from the loss of individual motivation in group settings, to the vulnerability of groups to ...


Dualism And Doctrine, Alex Stein, Dov Fox 2015 SelectedWorks

Dualism And Doctrine, Alex Stein, Dov Fox

Alex Stein

What kinds of harm among those that tortfeasors inflict are worthy of compensation? Which forms of self-incriminating evidence are privileged against government compulsion? What sorts of facts constitute a criminal defendant’s intent? Existing doctrine pins the answer to all of these questions on whether the injury, facts, or evidence at stake are “mental” or “physical.” The assumption that operations of the mind are meaningfully distinct from those of the body animates fundamental rules in our law.

A tort victim cannot recover for mental harm on its own because the law presumes that he is able to unfeel any suffering ...


Systemic Lying, Julia Simon-Kerr 2015 SelectedWorks

Systemic Lying, Julia Simon-Kerr

Julia Simon-Kerr

This Article offers the foundational account of systemic lying from a definitional and theoretical perspective. Systemic lying involves the cooperation of multiple actors in the legal system who lie or violate their oaths across cases for a consistent reason that is linked to their conception of justice. It becomes a functioning mechanism within the legal system and changes the operation of the law as written. By identifying systemic lying, this Article challenges the assumption that all lying in the legal system is the same. It argues that systemic lying poses a particular threat to the legal system. This means that ...


Brown V. Plata: Renewing The Call To End Mandatory Minimum Sentencing, Steven Nauman 2014 University of Florida Levin College of Law

Brown V. Plata: Renewing The Call To End Mandatory Minimum Sentencing, Steven Nauman

Florida Law Review

After more than twenty years of litigation, the United States Supreme Court finally determined whether California’s overcrowded prison system created a constitutional violation in Brown v. Plata. With prisons and jails across the country operating at well over 100% capacity, the Court concluded what advocates had been screaming for over a decade: prison overcrowding cannot be tolerated, and the only remedy is to reduce prison populations. What the Court failed to resolve, however, was what the primary cause of prison overcrowding is and how states and the federal government are supposed to comply with capacity expectations amid concerns for ...


Bringing Our Children Back From The Land Of Nod: Why The Eighth Amendment Forbids Condemning Juveniles To Die In Prison For Accessorial Felony Murder, Mariko K. Shitama 2014 University of Florida Levin College of Law

Bringing Our Children Back From The Land Of Nod: Why The Eighth Amendment Forbids Condemning Juveniles To Die In Prison For Accessorial Felony Murder, Mariko K. Shitama

Florida Law Review

Over 2,589 individuals sit in prison, where they have been condemned to die for crimes they committed before their eighteenth birthday. At least a quarter of these individuals received this sentence for accessorial felony murder, or a crime in which they did not kill or intend to kill the victim. Beginning with Roper v. Simmons in 2005 and continuing with Graham v. Florida in 2010, recent Eighth Amendment jurisprudence has recognized that juveniles are fundamentally different from adults in ways that limit the constitutionality of imposing adult punishment on them. In June 2012, the Supreme Court held that sentencing ...


The Jurisprudence Of Nature: The Importance Of Defining What Is "Natural", Jill M. Fraley 2014 The Catholic University of America, Columbus School of Law

The Jurisprudence Of Nature: The Importance Of Defining What Is "Natural", Jill M. Fraley

Catholic University Law Review

Informal regulations defining nature, natural, and organic have proliferated across diverse fields of law from patents to agriculture, from taxation to gemstones. The unwritten jurisprudence of defining nature is primarily a story of the struggle to isolate mankind’s manipulations and interventions, creating a man-nature dichotomy that frustrates more than it explicates. This failure to define nature continues with the Supreme Court’s recent Myriad decision, which struggles to define the law of nature exception to patentability, highlighting the challenge of measuring levels of human intervention and manipulation. Our dichotomous definitions do not generate neat, binary answers, but rather complicated ...


The Dimensions Of Judicial Impartiality, Charles Gardner Geyh 2014 University of Florida Levin College of Law

The Dimensions Of Judicial Impartiality, Charles Gardner Geyh

Florida Law Review

Scholars have traditionally analyzed judicial impartiality piecemeal, in disconnected debates on discrete topics. As a consequence, current understandings of judicial impartiality are balkanized and muddled. This Article seeks to reconceptualize judicial impartiality comprehensively, across contexts. In an era when “we are all legal realists now,” perfect impartiality—the complete absence of bias or prejudice—is at most an ideal; “impartial enough” has, of necessity, become the realistic goal. Understanding when imperfectly impartial is nonetheless impartial enough is aided by conceptualizing judicial impartiality in three distinct dimensions: a procedural dimension, in which impartiality affords parties a fair hearing; a political dimension ...


Judicial Logrolling, F. Andrew Hessick, Jathan P. McLaughlin 2014 University of Florida Levin College of Law

Judicial Logrolling, F. Andrew Hessick, Jathan P. Mclaughlin

Florida Law Review

In the federal judicial system, multiple judges hear cases on appeal. Although assigning cases to multiple judges provides a number of benefits, it also generates the potential for conflict. Because each judge has his own set of preferences and values, judges on appellate panels often disagree with each other. Judges currently resolve these disagreements by filing separate opinions or drafting compromise opinions. A different way to resolve these disagreements is to allow vote trading across cases. Scholars and judges have condemned this practice, however, and judges have insisted that it does not occur.

This Article argues that the blanket condemnation ...


The Confusing Standards For Discretionary Review In Washington And A Proposed Framework For Clarity, Judge Stephen Dwyer 2014 Seattle University School of Law

The Confusing Standards For Discretionary Review In Washington And A Proposed Framework For Clarity, Judge Stephen Dwyer

Seattle University Law Review

It has now been more than thirty-five years since the Washington Rules of Appellate Procedure (RAP) became effective in 1976 and replaced all prior rules governing appellate procedure. One significant change that those rules made was to clearly describe and delineate a procedural mechanism for seeking interlocutory review of trial court decisions. The ultimate effect on practitioners is both obvious and unavoidable. Many lawyers, rather than stake out a clear position regarding the applicability of the various considerations governing discretionary review, simply argue that any and every consideration that is even arguably applicable is satisfied by the trial court’s ...


License To Discriminate: How A Washington Florist Is Making The Case For Applying Intermediary Scrutiny To Sexual Orientation, Kendra LaCour 2014 Seattle University School of Law

License To Discriminate: How A Washington Florist Is Making The Case For Applying Intermediary Scrutiny To Sexual Orientation, Kendra Lacour

Seattle University Law Review

Over the past few decades, the debate over sexual orientation has risen to the forefront of civil rights issues. Though the focus has generally been on the right to marriage, peripheral issues associated with the right to marriage—and with sexual orientation generally—have become more common in recent years. As the number of states permitting same-sex marriage—along with states prohibiting discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation—increases, so too does the conflict between providers of public accommodations and those seeking their services. Never is this situation more problematic than when religious beliefs are cited as the basis ...


Defending Legal Realism: A Response To Four Critics, Hanoch Dagan 2014 BLR

Defending Legal Realism: A Response To Four Critics, Hanoch Dagan

Tel Aviv University Law Faculty Papers

My recently published book, Reconstructing American Legal Realism & Rethinking Private Law Theory (Oxford University Press, 2013), seeks to revive our understanding of law as a set of institutions accommodating three sets of constitutive tensions: power and reason, science and craft, and tradition and progress. This Issue of Critical Analysis of Law honored me with the publication of thoughtful and generous book reviews by Alan Brudner, Dan Farbman, Joseph Singer, and Laura Underkuffler. This short Essay reflects upon their insightful and important observations and attempts to provide some answers to their interesting and intriguing critiques of my account. I begin with ...


Restoring Constitutional Equilibrium, Adam Lamparello 2014 SelectedWorks

Restoring Constitutional Equilibrium, Adam Lamparello

Adam Lamparello

In areas such as the Fourteenth Amendment, the Supreme Court's lack of institutional restraint has affected citizens of every political persuasion. In Bush v. Gore, the Florida Supreme Court’s recount order was blocked. ‘Liberals,’ lost. In Roe v. Wade, the Court required state legislatures to allow most abortions in the first trimester. ‘Conservatives’ lost. In Clinton v. City of New York and Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, the coordinate branch’s attempt to ensure a more efficient and fairer government was thwarted. Average citizens lost. The problem is not a liberal or conservative one, whatever those words ...


Avoiding The “Playpumps” Legacy: Accessible Judgments As A Practical Means To Reengage African Interest And Salvage The International Criminal Court, Matthew C. Kane 2014 SelectedWorks

Avoiding The “Playpumps” Legacy: Accessible Judgments As A Practical Means To Reengage African Interest And Salvage The International Criminal Court, Matthew C. Kane

Matthew C Kane

Long marginalized or directly opposed by the United States and other superpowers, the International Criminal Court is facing a crisis, as many countries that need, and most frequently have relied on, the institution have become increasing adverse to the Court. While many jurists and academics view the ICC as the culmination of an emerging jurisprudence of international criminal law, there is simply no certainty that the Court can avoid becoming the legal version of the ill-fated “PlayPumps,” a project welcomed with great enthusiasm that, a decade later, is no more, its existence evidenced only by the rusty merry-go-rounds littering the ...


Luck V. Justice: Consent Intervenes, But For Whom?, Jennifer W. Reynolds 2014 Pepperdine University

Luck V. Justice: Consent Intervenes, But For Whom?, Jennifer W. Reynolds

Pepperdine Dispute Resolution Law Journal

Consent in civil settlements should improve access to and delivery of justice by making luck (chance, contingencies, arbitrariness) less significant in process and outcomes. Consent-based processes and private settlement are supposed to support justice by redistributing decision-making power away from judicial-coercive authorities to the people most affected by the dispute. But consent today has become little more than a pro forma process lever for bypassing regulation, litigation, and other more formal structures. No longer does consent serve as a reliable bulwark against luck distortions and arbitrariness in legal systems. Opening shrink-wrap (consent to arbitrate!), being shunted into compulsory mediation (consent ...


Illegal Agreements And The Lesser Evil Principle, Chunlin Leonhard 2014 SelectedWorks

Illegal Agreements And The Lesser Evil Principle, Chunlin Leonhard

Chunlin Leonhard

Illegal agreement disputes force U.S. courts to wrestle with multiple competing interests. The courts’ approach has been generally explained and understood in terms of the general rule of non-enforcement of illegal agreements with numerous exceptions. The case law on this topic has been described as “a vast, confusing and rather mysterious area of the law.” This article offers the insight that, contrary to common belief, courts’ approach to illegal agreements shows a consistent pattern. A review of randomly selected cases shows that the courts have by and large consistently (albeit implicitly) applied the lesser evil principle in resolving the ...


Pragmatic Liberalism: The Outlook Of The Dead, Justin Desautels-Stein 2014 Boston College Law School

Pragmatic Liberalism: The Outlook Of The Dead, Justin Desautels-Stein

Boston College Law Review

At the turn of the twentieth century, the legal profession was rocked in a storm of reform. Among the sparks of change was the view that “law in the books” had drifted too far from the “law in action.” This popular slogan reflected the broader postwar suspicion that the legal profession needed to be more realistic, more effective, and more in touch with the social needs of the time. A hundred years later, we face a similarly urgent demand for change. Across the blogs and journals stretches a thread of anxieties about the lack of fit between legal education and ...


Counsel For The Divorce, Rebecca Aviel 2014 Boston College Law School

Counsel For The Divorce, Rebecca Aviel

Boston College Law Review

This article challenges the legal profession’s foundational assumption that legal services must be delivered in an adversarial posture, with lawyers compelled to engage in robust partisan advocacy on behalf of their clients’ individualized interests. This narrow conception of the lawyer’s role is particularly inapt in family law because many divorcing spouses actually seek joint counsel, understanding that they have profound shared interests in minimizing transaction costs, maximizing the value of the marital estate, and reducing the hostility and animosity that are so harmful to children. Couples who wish to advance these interests by retaining joint counsel are poorly ...


Democracy, Judicial Review And The Rule Of Law In The Age Of Terrorism: The Experience Of Israel - A Comparative Perspective, Ralph Ruebner 2014 University of Georgia School of Law

Democracy, Judicial Review And The Rule Of Law In The Age Of Terrorism: The Experience Of Israel - A Comparative Perspective, Ralph Ruebner

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


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