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4,394 full-text articles. Page 1 of 76.

Catalogs, Alex Stein, Gideon Parchomovsky 2015 SelectedWorks

Catalogs, Alex Stein, Gideon Parchomovsky

Alex Stein

It is a virtual axiom in the world of law that legal norms come in two prototypes: rules and standards. The accepted lore suggests that rules should be formulated to regulate recurrent and frequent behaviors, whose contours can be defined with sufficient precision. Standards, by contrast, should be employed to address complex, variegated, behaviors that require the weighing of multiple variables. Rules rely on an ex ante perspective and are therefore considered the domain of the legislator; standards embody a preference for ex post, ad-hoc, analysis and are therefore considered the domain of courts. The rules/standards dichotomy has become ...


All Together Now: Using Principles Of Group Dynamics To Train Better Jurors, Sara G. Gordon 2015 University of Nevada, Las Vegas -- William S. Boyd School of Law

All Together Now: Using Principles Of Group Dynamics To Train Better Jurors, Sara G. Gordon

Scholarly Works

We ask juries to make important decisions that have a profound impact on people’s lives. We leave these decisions in the hands of groups of laypeople because we hope that the diverse range of experiences and knowledge in the group will lead to more thoughtful and informed decisionmaking. Studies suggest that diverse groups of jurors have different perspectives on evidence, engage in more thorough debate, and more closely evaluate facts. At the same time, there are a variety of problems associated with group decisionmaking, from the loss of individual motivation in group settings, to the vulnerability of groups to ...


Dualism And Doctrine, Alex Stein, Dov Fox 2015 SelectedWorks

Dualism And Doctrine, Alex Stein, Dov Fox

Alex Stein

What kinds of harm among those that tortfeasors inflict are worthy of compensation? Which forms of self-incriminating evidence are privileged against government compulsion? What sorts of facts constitute a criminal defendant’s intent? Existing doctrine pins the answer to all of these questions on whether the injury, facts, or evidence at stake are “mental” or “physical.” The assumption that operations of the mind are meaningfully distinct from those of the body animates fundamental rules in our law.

A tort victim cannot recover for mental harm on its own because the law presumes that he is able to unfeel any suffering ...


Systemic Lying, Julia Simon-Kerr 2015 SelectedWorks

Systemic Lying, Julia Simon-Kerr

Julia Simon-Kerr

This Article offers the foundational account of systemic lying from a definitional and theoretical perspective. Systemic lying involves the cooperation of multiple actors in the legal system who lie or violate their oaths across cases for a consistent reason that is linked to their conception of justice. It becomes a functioning mechanism within the legal system and changes the operation of the law as written. By identifying systemic lying, this Article challenges the assumption that all lying in the legal system is the same. It argues that systemic lying poses a particular threat to the legal system. This means that ...


Believe It Or Not: Mitigating The Negative Effects Personal Belief And Bias Have On The Criminal Justice System, Sarah A. Mourer 2015 University of Miami

Believe It Or Not: Mitigating The Negative Effects Personal Belief And Bias Have On The Criminal Justice System, Sarah A. Mourer

Sarah Mourer

This article examines the prosecutor’s and defense attorney’s personal pre-trial beliefs regarding the accused’s guilt or innocence. This analysis suggests that when an attorney does hold pretrial beliefs, such beliefs lead to avoidable bias and errors. These biases may alter the findings throughout all stages of the case. The procedure asking that the prosecution seek justice while having nothing more than probable cause results in the prosecutor’s need to have a belief in guilt before proceeding to trial. While this belief is intended to foster integrity and fairness in the criminal justice system, to the contrary ...


The Corporate Conspiracy Vacuum (Formerly "Corporate Conspiracy: How Not Calling A Conspiracy A Conspiracy Is Warping The Law On Corporate Wrongdoing"), Josephine Sandler Nelson 2015 SelectedWorks

The Corporate Conspiracy Vacuum (Formerly "Corporate Conspiracy: How Not Calling A Conspiracy A Conspiracy Is Warping The Law On Corporate Wrongdoing"), Josephine Sandler Nelson

J.S. Nelson

The intracorporate conspiracy doctrine immunizes an enterprise and its agents from conspiracy prosecution based on the legal fiction that an enterprise and its agents are a single actor incapable of the meeting of two minds to form a conspiracy. The doctrine, however, misplaces incentives in contravention of agency law, criminal law, tort law, and public policy. As a result of this absence of accountability, harmful behavior is ordered and performed without consequences, and the victims of the behavior suffer without appropriate remedy.

The vacuum at the center of American conspiracy law has now warped the doctrines around it. Especially in ...


A Dynamic Theory Of Judicial Role, David Landau 2014 Boston College Law School

A Dynamic Theory Of Judicial Role, David Landau

Boston College Law Review

Recent scholarship has focused heavily on the activism of courts in the fragile democracies of the “Global South.” Courts in countries like India, Colombia, and South Africa have issued landmark decisions in difficult political environments, in the process raising unanswered questions about the appropriate conception of judicial role in these climates. Much of the judicial and academic effort in these contexts is self-consciously oriented towards using courts to carry out basic improvements in the quality of political systems seen as badly deficient. In other words, the core task is to improve the quality of the democratic system over time. These ...


Elementary Statutory Interpretation: Rethinking Legislative Intent And History , Victoria F. Nourse 2014 Boston College Law School

Elementary Statutory Interpretation: Rethinking Legislative Intent And History , Victoria F. Nourse

Boston College Law Review

This Article argues that theorists and practitioners of statutory interpretation should rethink two very basic concepts—legislative intent and legislative history. Textualists urge that to look to legislative history is to seek an intent that does not exist. This Article argues we should put this objection to bed because, even if groups do not have minds, they have the functional equivalent of intent: they plan by using internal sequential procedures allowing them to project their collective actions forward in time. What we should mean by legislative “intent” is legislative “context.” For a group, context includes how groups act—their procedures ...


The Case For Defamatory Opinion, Adam Lamparello 2014 SelectedWorks

The Case For Defamatory Opinion, Adam Lamparello

Adam Lamparello

The law should not allow revenge porn in the name of the First Amendment, just as it should not allow private citizens to purchase AK-47’s in the name of the Second Amendment. Citizens can abuse fundamental rights just as governments can infringe them. At some point, courts have to acknowledge that the First Amendment was not intended to give people a fundamental right to trash an individual’s reputation while seeking cover under the self-serving blanket of opinion and taste. It is one thing to stroll into a courthouse with a shirt that says Fuck the Draft, but quite ...


Anti-Constitutional Moments, F.E. Guerra-Pujol 2014 SelectedWorks

Anti-Constitutional Moments, F.E. Guerra-Pujol

F.E. Guerra-Pujol

My previous paper “Gödel’s Loophole,” 41 Cap. U. L. Rev. 637 (2013) -- which has been downloaded over 3000 times on SSRN and has been featured on such websites as io9 and Hacker News -- has generated extensive commentary from academics and laypersons alike.

Because of the interest in the subject matter of my previous paper on “Gödel’s Loophole,” I have written a new paper titled “Anti-Constitutional Moments” in which I combine legal history and constitutional theory in order to explore in detail an intriguing idea I first put forth in my previous work. In summary, previously I retold the ...


The Cross-Fertilization Of Human Rights Norms And Indigenous Peoples In Africa: From Endorois And Beyond, Derek M K Inman 2014 Western University

The Cross-Fertilization Of Human Rights Norms And Indigenous Peoples In Africa: From Endorois And Beyond, Derek M K Inman

The International Indigenous Policy Journal

Beginning in the 20th century, international law expanded beyond law between nations to eventually embrace the concept of human rights. However, until recently, human rights efforts were focused mostly on individuals, their rights and the obligations of the state in question. Indigenous peoples, on the other hand, have always articulated their collective rights and, to their credit, achieved notable success.

While there is no doubt that these achievements should be applauded, what is also of interest, and deserves further study, are the ways in which human rights jurisprudence concerning Indigenous peoples’ collective rights intermingle, cross-fertilize, and integrate. This dynamic relationship ...


The Scope Of Precedent, Randy J. Kozel 2014 University of Michigan Law School

The Scope Of Precedent, Randy J. Kozel

Michigan Law Review

The scope of Supreme Court precedent is capacious. Justices of the Court commonly defer to sweeping rationales and elaborate doctrinal frameworks articulated by their predecessors. This practice infuses judicial precedent with the prescriptive power of enacted constitutional and statutory text. The lower federal courts follow suit, regularly abiding by the Supreme Court’s broad pronouncements. These phenomena cannot be explained by—and, indeed, oftentimes subvert—the classic distinction between binding holdings and dispensable dicta. This Article connects the scope of precedent with recurring and foundational debates about the proper ends of judicial interpretation. A precedent’s forward- looking effect should ...


The Place Of Jurisprudence In The Law Academy:An Appraisal, Kevin Ndoho Macharia 2014 SelectedWorks

The Place Of Jurisprudence In The Law Academy:An Appraisal, Kevin Ndoho Macharia

Kevin Ndoho Macharia

The thesis statement given is that; in essence jurisprudence is a serious legal discourse. It should be accepted universally as a co-unit in the training of lawyers. Its importance is based on the fact that it forms the basis of studying all other units of law. I set out in this paper to explore the place of jurisprudence in the law school curriculum. I also give reasons supporting the thesis statement: why jurisprudence has become generally accepted as the basis of studying all other units of law. I also tackle some criticisms of it being so accepted; and in conclusion ...


The Kingdom Of God In Samuel, Geoffrey P. Miller 2014 NELLCO

The Kingdom Of God In Samuel, Geoffrey P. Miller

New York University Public Law and Legal Theory Working Papers

This paper argues that the idea of the kingdom of God in the Hebrew Bible refers to theocracy – the political system in which authority is exercised by God’s representative on earth. The relevant texts, most importantly parts of the Book of Samuel, explore the advantages and disadvantages of theocratic rule and compare that form of government with other models. Bible’s treatment of this topic is subtle and nuanced, recognizing virtues in theocratic rule but concluding, overall, that it does not deliver sustainable and effective governance in the real world.


When The Commerce Clause Goes International: A Proposed Legal Framework For The Foreign Commerce Clause, Naomi Harlin Goodno 2014 University of Florida Levin College of Law

When The Commerce Clause Goes International: A Proposed Legal Framework For The Foreign Commerce Clause, Naomi Harlin Goodno

Florida Law Review

The world is becoming a smaller place. Technology and the Internet have made global travel and communication easier, quicker, and more common. Novel legal issues arise every day to deal with this modern interconnected world. How does the law address these new problems?

Congress is allowed “[t]o regulate Commerce with foreign Nations, and among the several States, and with the Indian Tribes.” The scope of Congress’s power to regulate commerce “among the several States” (the “Interstate Commerce Clause”) has long been debated. In the modern world of global interaction, Congress’s power to regulate commerce “with foreign Nations ...


Regulation By Amicus:The Department Of Labor’S Policy Making In The Courts, Deborah Thompson Eisenberg 2014 University of Florida Levin College of Law

Regulation By Amicus:The Department Of Labor’S Policy Making In The Courts, Deborah Thompson Eisenberg

Florida Law Review

This Article examines the practice of “regulation by amicus”: that is, an agency’s attempt to mold statutory interpretation and establish policy by filing “friend of the court” briefs in private litigation. Since the United States Supreme Court recognized agency amicus interpretations as a source of controlling law entitled to deference in Auer v. Robbins, agencies have used amicus curiae briefs—in strategic and at times aggressive ways—to advance the political agenda of the President in the courts.

Using the lens of the U.S. Department of Labor’s amicus activity in wage and hour cases, this Article explores ...


Dr John Liebert Presentation, Dr John Liebert 2014 Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University

Dr John Liebert Presentation, Dr John Liebert

National Security and Intelligence Symposium

No abstract provided.


Law In Ancient Egyptian Fiction, Russ VerSteeg 2014 University of Georgia School of Law

Law In Ancient Egyptian Fiction, Russ Versteeg

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


Brown V. Plata: Renewing The Call To End Mandatory Minimum Sentencing, Steven Nauman 2014 University of Florida Levin College of Law

Brown V. Plata: Renewing The Call To End Mandatory Minimum Sentencing, Steven Nauman

Florida Law Review

After more than twenty years of litigation, the United States Supreme Court finally determined whether California’s overcrowded prison system created a constitutional violation in Brown v. Plata. With prisons and jails across the country operating at well over 100% capacity, the Court concluded what advocates had been screaming for over a decade: prison overcrowding cannot be tolerated, and the only remedy is to reduce prison populations. What the Court failed to resolve, however, was what the primary cause of prison overcrowding is and how states and the federal government are supposed to comply with capacity expectations amid concerns for ...


Bringing Our Children Back From The Land Of Nod: Why The Eighth Amendment Forbids Condemning Juveniles To Die In Prison For Accessorial Felony Murder, Mariko K. Shitama 2014 University of Florida Levin College of Law

Bringing Our Children Back From The Land Of Nod: Why The Eighth Amendment Forbids Condemning Juveniles To Die In Prison For Accessorial Felony Murder, Mariko K. Shitama

Florida Law Review

Over 2,589 individuals sit in prison, where they have been condemned to die for crimes they committed before their eighteenth birthday. At least a quarter of these individuals received this sentence for accessorial felony murder, or a crime in which they did not kill or intend to kill the victim. Beginning with Roper v. Simmons in 2005 and continuing with Graham v. Florida in 2010, recent Eighth Amendment jurisprudence has recognized that juveniles are fundamentally different from adults in ways that limit the constitutionality of imposing adult punishment on them. In June 2012, the Supreme Court held that sentencing ...


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