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The Age Of Constitutions In The Americas, M C. Mirow 2017 Florida International University College of Law

The Age Of Constitutions In The Americas, M C. Mirow

M. C. Mirow

The late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries have been aptly called the “Age of Codifications.” The same period was also the Age of Constitutions. Although a great deal is known about the migration of prenational and transnational legal sources and ideas that led to national codes of civil and criminal law in Europe and the Americas, much less is known about similar processes on the constitutional level. Constitutional historians have been more parochial than their private law counterparts, most likely because of the relationship between constitutions and nations. In the light of independence, nations immediately needed constitutions to solidify gains and ...


Faultless Guilt: Toward A Relationship Based View Of Criminal Liability, Amy Sepinwall 2016 Legal Studies & Business Ethics/Wharton University of Pennsylvania

Faultless Guilt: Toward A Relationship Based View Of Criminal Liability, Amy Sepinwall

Amy J. Sepinwall

There is in the criminal law perhaps no principle more canonical than the fault principle, which holds that one may be punished only where one is blameworthy, and one is blameworthy only where one is at fault. Courts, criminal law scholars, moral philosophers and textbook authors all take the fault principle to be the foundational requirement for a just criminal law. Indeed, perceived threats to the fault principle in the mid-Twentieth Century yielded no less an achievement than the drafting of the Model Penal Code, which had as its guiding purpose an effort to safeguard faultless conduct from criminal condemnation ...


Construction, Originalist Interpretation And The Complete Constitution, Richard Kay 2016 Selected Works

Construction, Originalist Interpretation And The Complete Constitution, Richard Kay

Richard Kay

 In recent years, the literature of constitutional originalism has adopted a new concept, “constitutional construction.” This Essay critically examines that concept. Contrary to some claims, the difference between “interpretation” and “construction” is not well established in common law adjudication. Furthermore, contemporary descriptions of constitutional construction tend to leave some ill-defined discretion in the hands of constitutional decision-makers. Finally, the Essay disputes the claim that constitutional construction is indispensable because the constitutional text is incomplete, that failing to provide a decision-rule for many—indeed for most—constitutional disputes. The Constitution would indeed be incomplete if interpreted according to the “new” or ...


Jurisprudence: Readings And Cases, Dr. Miriam Theresa Rooney 2016 St. John's University School of Law

Jurisprudence: Readings And Cases, Dr. Miriam Theresa Rooney

The Catholic Lawyer

No abstract provided.


Comment On Gardner: Duty And Right In Private Law, Gregory C. Keating 2016 University of Southern California

Comment On Gardner: Duty And Right In Private Law, Gregory C. Keating

University of Southern California Legal Studies Working Paper Series

John Gardner’s From Personal Life to Private Law is a striking marriage of cultivated sensibility and analytic prowess. Professor Gardner is both acutely sensitive to the lived experience of our moral relationships and highly skilled at disentangling the threads which those relationships weave together to realize rich and distinctive forms of value. From Personal Life to Private Law pursues its thesis that there are multiple and deep connections between the ideas of duty, responsibility and reparation that lie at the center of private law and their counterparts in the relationships that figure centrally in our private lives with both ...


Must The Hand Formula Not Be Named?, Gregory C. Keating 2016 University of Southern California

Must The Hand Formula Not Be Named?, Gregory C. Keating

University of Southern California Legal Studies Working Paper Series

This paper responds to Benjamin Zipursky’s Reasonableness in and out of Negligence Law 163 U. PA. L. REV. 2131 (2015). It takes issue with Professor Zipursky’s aversion to the Hand Formula. Trying to write the Hand Formula out of negligence law at this late date is tantamount to repudiating one hundred years of tort law and theory. This revisionary theorizing is as unnecessary as it is quixotic. The Hand Formula is not only too deeply embedded in negligence law to uproot; it is also unobjectionable. Indeed, the Hand Formula is one of modern negligence law’s more important ...


Comment On Avraham And Yuracko: Torts And The Paradox Of Conservative Justice, Gregory C. Keating 2016 University of Southern California

Comment On Avraham And Yuracko: Torts And The Paradox Of Conservative Justice, Gregory C. Keating

University of Southern California Legal Studies Working Paper Series

This paper comments on Ronen Avraham & Kim Yuracko, Torts and Discrimination forthcoming in the Ohio State Law Journal. Professors Avraham and Yuracko’s fine article, Torts and Discrimination, calls our attention to the fact that the entrenched fact of race and gender discrimination exerts a powerful, structural influence on tort damages, especially in bodily injury and wrongful death cases. Damages in tort—and in private law more generally—are reparative. Their role is to put the plaintiff in the position he would have been in but for the defendant’s wrong. Making the plaintiff whole requires that courts determine how ...


Liability Without Regard To Fault: A Comment On Goldberg & Zipursky, Gregory C. Keating 2016 University of Southern California

Liability Without Regard To Fault: A Comment On Goldberg & Zipursky, Gregory C. Keating

University of Southern California Legal Studies Working Paper Series

This paper comments on John C.P. Goldberg & Benjamin C. Zipursky, The Strict Liability in Fault and the Fault in Strict Liability 85 Fordham L.Rev. 743 (2016). In their important writings over the past twenty years, Professors Goldberg and Zipursky have argued that torts are conduct-based wrongs. A conduct-based wrong is one where an agent violates the right of another by failing to conform her conduct to the standard required by the law. Strict liability in tort poses a formidable challenge to the claim that all torts are wrongs whose distinctive feature is that they violate an applicable standard ...


State-Action Immunity And Section 5 Of The Ftc Act, Daniel A. Crane, Adam Hester 2016 University of Michigan Law School

State-Action Immunity And Section 5 Of The Ftc Act, Daniel A. Crane, Adam Hester

Michigan Law Review

The state-action immunity doctrine of Parker v. Brown immunizes anticompetitive state regulations from preemption by federal antitrust law so long as the state takes conspicuous ownership of its anticompetitive policy. In its 1943 Parker decision, the Supreme Court justified this doctrine, observing that no evidence of a congressional will to preempt state law appears in the Sherman Act’s legislative history or context. In addition, commentators generally assume that the New Deal court was anxious to avoid re-entangling the federal judiciary in Lochner-style substantive due process analysis. The Supreme Court has observed, without deciding, that the Federal Trade Commission ...


Understanding Wellness International Network; Ltd. V. Sharif: The Problems With Allowing Parties To Impliedly Consent To Bankruptcy Court Adjudication Of Stern Claims, Elizabeth Jackson 2016 Brooklyn Law School

Understanding Wellness International Network; Ltd. V. Sharif: The Problems With Allowing Parties To Impliedly Consent To Bankruptcy Court Adjudication Of Stern Claims, Elizabeth Jackson

Brooklyn Journal of Corporate, Financial & Commercial Law

The 2011 Supreme Court case Stern v. Marshall defined which claims bankruptcy courts had the authority to adjudicate; but it’s complicated holding left lower courts perplexed. Specifically; the Stern decision created “Stern claims”—claims that bankruptcy courts have the statutory; but not the constitutional; authority to adjudicate. Subsequent cases; such as Executive Benefits Insurance Agency v. Arkison and Wellness International Network; Ltd. v. Sharif; have grappled with whether Stern claims should be treated as “core” claims; which bankruptcy courts can enter final judgments on; or “non-core” claims; which bankruptcy courts can only enter final judgments on if the litigating ...


The Core Of An Unqualified Case For Judicial Review: A Reply To Jeremy Waldron And Contemporary Critics, Alexander Kaufman, Michael B. Runnels 2016 Brooklyn Law School

The Core Of An Unqualified Case For Judicial Review: A Reply To Jeremy Waldron And Contemporary Critics, Alexander Kaufman, Michael B. Runnels

Brooklyn Law Review

No abstract provided.


Is The Internet Rotting Oklahoma Law?, Lee Peoples 2016 Oklahoma City University

Is The Internet Rotting Oklahoma Law?, Lee Peoples

Lee Peoples

No abstract provided.


Collective Coercion, Benjamin Means, Susan S. Kuo 2016 University of South Carolina School of Law

Collective Coercion, Benjamin Means, Susan S. Kuo

Boston College Law Review

When a collective-choice situation places coercive pressure on individual participants, the law’s traditional protection of individual autonomy against coercion must be reconciled with its necessary role in resolving problems of collective action. On the one hand, the law might seek to remove coercion from the equation so that individuals are free to make their own decisions. On the other hand, the law might empower a central authority to decide, thereby solving a problem of collective action in order to maximize the group’s shared interests. The tension between these two approaches creates deep uncertainty for the regulation of collective-choice ...


Act Of State Doctrine: Actions Of Intervenors Appointed By The Cuban Government And Statements Of Counsel Do Not Constitute Sufficient Acts Of State To Come Within The Doctrine (Alfred Dunhill Of London, Inc. V. Republic Of Cuba, S. Ct. 1976), John C. Stephens 2016 University of Georgia School of Law

Act Of State Doctrine: Actions Of Intervenors Appointed By The Cuban Government And Statements Of Counsel Do Not Constitute Sufficient Acts Of State To Come Within The Doctrine (Alfred Dunhill Of London, Inc. V. Republic Of Cuba, S. Ct. 1976), John C. Stephens

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


Trademarks “Lanham Act” Foreign Registrants Need Not Allege Use In The United States And May Waive Filing Requirements Required For Domestic Applications (Scm Corporation V. Langis Foods, Ltd., D.C. Cir. 1976), John A. Cutler 2016 University of Georgia School of Law

Trademarks “Lanham Act” Foreign Registrants Need Not Allege Use In The United States And May Waive Filing Requirements Required For Domestic Applications (Scm Corporation V. Langis Foods, Ltd., D.C. Cir. 1976), John A. Cutler

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


Jus Cogens In International Law, With A Projected List, Marjorie M. Whiteman 2016 University of Georgia School of Law

Jus Cogens In International Law, With A Projected List, Marjorie M. Whiteman

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


The World Court And The Peaceful Settlement Of Disputes, Cornelius F. Murphy Jr. 2016 Duquesne University School of Law

The World Court And The Peaceful Settlement Of Disputes, Cornelius F. Murphy Jr.

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


The Moroccan Jurist Al-Khamlīshī: Can A Woman Become A Legislator (Mujtahid)?, Nayel A. Badareen 2564414 2016 University of Arizona

The Moroccan Jurist Al-Khamlīshī: Can A Woman Become A Legislator (Mujtahid)?, Nayel A. Badareen 2564414

Mathal

The idea of deducing legal rulings in Islamic law, or ijtihād, as well as the qualifications of the person who practices ijtihād, known as the mujtahid, has been a complex issue among Muslim ʿulamāʾ for centuries. Many Muslim ʿulamāʾ and Western scholars have maintained that the gate of ijtihād was closed. The title of mujtahid was therefore impossible to attain. The Moroccan intellectual al-Khamlīshī maintains that the strenuous conditions put forth by some of the Sunni jurists to qualify an individual to become a mujtahid actually contributed to the demise of ijtihād. These qualifications, according to al-Khamlīshī, were proven to ...


Beyond Punks In Empty Chairs: An Imaginary Conversation With Clint Eastwood’S Dirty Harry—Toward Peace Through Spiritual Justice, Mark L. Jones 2016 University of Massachusetts School of Law

Beyond Punks In Empty Chairs: An Imaginary Conversation With Clint Eastwood’S Dirty Harry—Toward Peace Through Spiritual Justice, Mark L. Jones

University of Massachusetts Law Review

This Article is based on a presentation at the 2012 conference on “Struggles for Recognition: Individuals, Peoples, and States” co-sponsored by Mercer University, the Concerned Philosophers for Peace, and the Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs, and it seeks to help combat our human tendency to demonize the Other and thus to contribute in some small way to the reduction of unnecessary conflict and violence. The discussion takes the form of a conversation in a bar between four imagined protagonists, who have participated in the conference, and Clint Eastwood’s Dirty Harry, who is having a bad day questioning ...


Ulysses: A Mighty Hero In The Fight For Freedom Of Expression, Marc J. Randazza 2016 University of Massachusetts School of Law

Ulysses: A Mighty Hero In The Fight For Freedom Of Expression, Marc J. Randazza

University of Massachusetts Law Review

James Joyce’s Ulysses was a revolutionary novel, and this much is common knowledge. What is not common knowledge is how useful Ulysses was in pushing the boundaries of freedom of expression. This masterpiece of literature opened the door for modern American free speech jurisprudence, but in recent years has become more of an object of judicial scorn. This Article seeks to educate legal scholars as to the importance of the novel, and attempts to reverse the anti-intellectual spirit that runs through modern American jurisprudence, where the novel is now more used as an object of mockery, or as a ...


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