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Faultless Guilt: Toward A Relationship Based View Of Criminal Liability, Amy Sepinwall 2016 Legal Studies & Business Ethics/Wharton University of Pennsylvania

Faultless Guilt: Toward A Relationship Based View Of Criminal Liability, Amy Sepinwall

Amy J. Sepinwall

There is in the criminal law perhaps no principle more canonical than the fault principle, which holds that one may be punished only where one is blameworthy, and one is blameworthy only where one is at fault. Courts, criminal law scholars, moral philosophers and textbook authors all take the fault principle to be the foundational requirement for a just criminal law. Indeed, perceived threats to the fault principle in the mid-Twentieth Century yielded no less an achievement than the drafting of the Model Penal Code, which had as its guiding purpose an effort to safeguard faultless conduct from criminal condemnation ...


Construction, Originalist Interpretation And The Complete Constitution, Richard Kay 2016 Selected Works

Construction, Originalist Interpretation And The Complete Constitution, Richard Kay

Richard Kay

 In recent years, the literature of constitutional originalism has adopted a new concept, “constitutional construction.” This Essay critically examines that concept. Contrary to some claims, the difference between “interpretation” and “construction” is not well established in common law adjudication. Furthermore, contemporary descriptions of constitutional construction tend to leave some ill-defined discretion in the hands of constitutional decision-makers. Finally, the Essay disputes the claim that constitutional construction is indispensable because the constitutional text is incomplete, that failing to provide a decision-rule for many—indeed for most—constitutional disputes. The Constitution would indeed be incomplete if interpreted according to the “new” or ...


“To Remand, Or Not To Remand”: Ventura’S Ordinary Remand Rule And The Evolving Jurisprudence Of Futility, Patrick J. Glen 2016 Georgetown University Law Center

“To Remand, Or Not To Remand”: Ventura’S Ordinary Remand Rule And The Evolving Jurisprudence Of Futility, Patrick J. Glen

Patrick Glen

It is a foundational principle of administrative law that a reviewing court should not dispose of a petition for review or appeal on grounds not relied upon by the agency, and should not reach issues in the first instance not addressed administratively. In such circumstances, there is a strong presumption that the reviewing court should remand the case to the agency for further proceedings rather than reach out to decide the disputed issues. The United States Supreme Court explicitly extended operation of the “ordinary remand rule” to the immigration context in its 2002 decision in INS v. Ventura. Notwithstanding subsequent ...


Franz Kafka, Lawrence Joseph, And The Possibilities Of Jurisprudential Literature, Patrick J. Glen 2016 Georgetown University Law Center

Franz Kafka, Lawrence Joseph, And The Possibilities Of Jurisprudential Literature, Patrick J. Glen

Patrick Glen

The purpose of this article is twofold. First, it offers a complementary reading of Franz Kafka’s writings on the law and Lawrence Joseph’s novel Lawyerland. This reading focuses on the distinct perspectives offered by these authors. Whereas Kafka approaches the law from the perspective of the litigant or accused, Joseph’s perspective, through the eyes of his lawyers and judges, is that of the consummate insider. The importance of perspective rests with the fact that although law might constitute an objective system, its experience is inevitably subjective. The absurd malevolence of law in Kafka can thus be rationalized ...


“To Remand, Or Not To Remand”: Ventura’S Ordinary Remand Rule And The Evolving Jurisprudence Of Futility, Patrick J. Glen 2016 Georgetown University Law Center

“To Remand, Or Not To Remand”: Ventura’S Ordinary Remand Rule And The Evolving Jurisprudence Of Futility, Patrick J. Glen

Patrick Glen

It is a foundational principle of administrative law that a reviewing court should not dispose of a petition for review or appeal on grounds not relied upon by the agency, and should not reach issues in the first instance not addressed administratively. In such circumstances, there is a strong presumption that the reviewing court should remand the case to the agency for further proceedings rather than reach out to decide the disputed issues. The United States Supreme Court explicitly extended operation of the “ordinary remand rule” to the immigration context in its 2002 decision in INS v. Ventura. Notwithstanding subsequent ...


Franz Kafka, Lawrence Joseph, And The Possibilities Of Jurisprudential Literature, Patrick J. Glen 2016 Georgetown University Law Center

Franz Kafka, Lawrence Joseph, And The Possibilities Of Jurisprudential Literature, Patrick J. Glen

Patrick Glen

The purpose of this article is twofold. First, it offers a complementary reading of Franz Kafka’s writings on the law and Lawrence Joseph’s novel Lawyerland. This reading focuses on the distinct perspectives offered by these authors. Whereas Kafka approaches the law from the perspective of the litigant or accused, Joseph’s perspective, through the eyes of his lawyers and judges, is that of the consummate insider. The importance of perspective rests with the fact that although law might constitute an objective system, its experience is inevitably subjective. The absurd malevolence of law in Kafka can thus be rationalized ...


Is The Internet Rotting Oklahoma Law?, Lee Peoples 2016 Oklahoma City University

Is The Internet Rotting Oklahoma Law?, Lee Peoples

Lee Peoples

No abstract provided.


Collective Coercion, Benjamin Means, Susan S. Kuo 2016 University of South Carolina School of Law

Collective Coercion, Benjamin Means, Susan S. Kuo

Boston College Law Review

When a collective-choice situation places coercive pressure on individual participants, the law’s traditional protection of individual autonomy against coercion must be reconciled with its necessary role in resolving problems of collective action. On the one hand, the law might seek to remove coercion from the equation so that individuals are free to make their own decisions. On the other hand, the law might empower a central authority to decide, thereby solving a problem of collective action in order to maximize the group’s shared interests. The tension between these two approaches creates deep uncertainty for the regulation of collective-choice ...


Act Of State Doctrine: Actions Of Intervenors Appointed By The Cuban Government And Statements Of Counsel Do Not Constitute Sufficient Acts Of State To Come Within The Doctrine (Alfred Dunhill Of London, Inc. V. Republic Of Cuba, S. Ct. 1976), John C. Stephens 2016 University of Georgia School of Law

Act Of State Doctrine: Actions Of Intervenors Appointed By The Cuban Government And Statements Of Counsel Do Not Constitute Sufficient Acts Of State To Come Within The Doctrine (Alfred Dunhill Of London, Inc. V. Republic Of Cuba, S. Ct. 1976), John C. Stephens

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


Trademarks “Lanham Act” Foreign Registrants Need Not Allege Use In The United States And May Waive Filing Requirements Required For Domestic Applications (Scm Corporation V. Langis Foods, Ltd., D.C. Cir. 1976), John A. Cutler 2016 University of Georgia School of Law

Trademarks “Lanham Act” Foreign Registrants Need Not Allege Use In The United States And May Waive Filing Requirements Required For Domestic Applications (Scm Corporation V. Langis Foods, Ltd., D.C. Cir. 1976), John A. Cutler

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


Jus Cogens In International Law, With A Projected List, Marjorie M. Whiteman 2016 University of Georgia School of Law

Jus Cogens In International Law, With A Projected List, Marjorie M. Whiteman

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


The World Court And The Peaceful Settlement Of Disputes, Cornelius F. Murphy Jr. 2016 Duquesne University School of Law

The World Court And The Peaceful Settlement Of Disputes, Cornelius F. Murphy Jr.

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


The Moroccan Jurist Al-Khamlīshī: Can A Woman Become A Legislator (Mujtahid)?, Nayel A. Badareen 2564414 2016 University of Arizona

The Moroccan Jurist Al-Khamlīshī: Can A Woman Become A Legislator (Mujtahid)?, Nayel A. Badareen 2564414

Mathal

The idea of deducing legal rulings in Islamic law, or ijtihād, as well as the qualifications of the person who practices ijtihād, known as the mujtahid, has been a complex issue among Muslim ʿulamāʾ for centuries. Many Muslim ʿulamāʾ and Western scholars have maintained that the gate of ijtihād was closed. The title of mujtahid was therefore impossible to attain. The Moroccan intellectual al-Khamlīshī maintains that the strenuous conditions put forth by some of the Sunni jurists to qualify an individual to become a mujtahid actually contributed to the demise of ijtihād. These qualifications, according to al-Khamlīshī, were proven to ...


Beyond Punks In Empty Chairs: An Imaginary Conversation With Clint Eastwood’S Dirty Harry—Toward Peace Through Spiritual Justice, Mark L. Jones 2016 University of Massachusetts School of Law

Beyond Punks In Empty Chairs: An Imaginary Conversation With Clint Eastwood’S Dirty Harry—Toward Peace Through Spiritual Justice, Mark L. Jones

University of Massachusetts Law Review

This Article is based on a presentation at the 2012 conference on “Struggles for Recognition: Individuals, Peoples, and States” co-sponsored by Mercer University, the Concerned Philosophers for Peace, and the Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs, and it seeks to help combat our human tendency to demonize the Other and thus to contribute in some small way to the reduction of unnecessary conflict and violence. The discussion takes the form of a conversation in a bar between four imagined protagonists, who have participated in the conference, and Clint Eastwood’s Dirty Harry, who is having a bad day questioning ...


Ulysses: A Mighty Hero In The Fight For Freedom Of Expression, Marc J. Randazza 2016 University of Massachusetts School of Law

Ulysses: A Mighty Hero In The Fight For Freedom Of Expression, Marc J. Randazza

University of Massachusetts Law Review

James Joyce’s Ulysses was a revolutionary novel, and this much is common knowledge. What is not common knowledge is how useful Ulysses was in pushing the boundaries of freedom of expression. This masterpiece of literature opened the door for modern American free speech jurisprudence, but in recent years has become more of an object of judicial scorn. This Article seeks to educate legal scholars as to the importance of the novel, and attempts to reverse the anti-intellectual spirit that runs through modern American jurisprudence, where the novel is now more used as an object of mockery, or as a ...


Constitutional Borrowing, Nelson Tebbe, Robert L. Tsai 2016 Brooklyn Law School

Constitutional Borrowing, Nelson Tebbe, Robert L. Tsai

Robert L Tsai

Borrowing from one domain to promote ideas in another domain is a staple of constitutional decisionmaking. Precedents, arguments, concepts, tropes, and heuristics all can be carried across doctrinal boundaries for purposes of persuasion. Yet the practice itself remains underanalyzed. This Article seeks to bring greater theoretical attention to the matter It defines what constitutional borrowing is and what it is not, presents a typology that describes its common forms, undertakes a principled defense of borrowing, and identifies some of the risks involved. Our examples draw particular attention to places where legal mechanisms and ideas migrate between fields of law associated ...


• Tempering Civil Rights Conflicts: Common Law For The Moral Marketplace, Adam MacLeod 2016 Faulkner University

• Tempering Civil Rights Conflicts: Common Law For The Moral Marketplace, Adam Macleod

Adam MacLeod

The culture war has sprawled into the marketplace. Property is now sexy but also loaded with moral conflict. Baking or buying a cake, arranging or purchasing flowers, meeting with fellow students on a university campus for religious services, taking and posing for pictures, are all suddenly morally- and politically-freighted acts. Can law provide a peaceful solution to the present conflict between sexual-identity right claims and religious liberty? The purpose of this article is to argue that law, understood in its textured, common-law contours, can provide a more peaceful and reasonable solution than (a) positive law alone, (b) markets unmediated by ...


Importancia De Los Plenos Casatorios En Materia De Derechos Reales, Julio Eduardo Pozo Sánchez 2016 Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos

Importancia De Los Plenos Casatorios En Materia De Derechos Reales, Julio Eduardo Pozo Sánchez

Julio Eduardo Pozo Sánchez

Cinco de los ocho Plenos Casatorios celebrados hasta la fecha han abordado temas que le competen a los Derechos Reales. Veamos de qué tratan.


Legislative Art As Policy And Pedagogy, Albert Stabler 2016 University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Legislative Art As Policy And Pedagogy, Albert Stabler

Marilyn Zurmuehlen Working Papers in Art Education

The primary medium for artist Laurie Jo Reynolds is that of political lobbying. She refers to her practice as “legislative art,” adapting the term “legislative theater,” a technique for grassroots lawmaking developed and coined by Brazilian director and playwright Augusto Boal, who both founded the Theater of the Oppressed and served as a member of the Rio city government from 1993 to 1997. By linking the discourses of art and law, Reynolds’ practice can be understood as a form of education, highlighting the restrictions required for creativity, and the possibilities afforded by structure. In my essay I bring together European ...


The Evangelical Debate Over Climate Change, John Copeland Nagle 2016 Notre Dame Law School

The Evangelical Debate Over Climate Change, John Copeland Nagle

John Copeland Nagle

In 2006, a group of prominent evangelicals issued a statement calling for a greater response to climate change. Soon thereafter, another group of prominent evangelicals responded with their own statement urging caution before taking any action against climate change. This division among evangelicals concerning climate change may be surprising for a community that is usually portrayed as homogenous and as indifferent or hostile toward environmental regulation. Yet there is an ongoing debate among evangelicals regarding the severity of climate change, its causes, and the appropriate response. Why? The answer to this question is important because of the increasing prominence of ...


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