Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Legal Profession Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

4,129 Full-Text Articles 2,248 Authors 474,811 Downloads 101 Institutions

All Articles in Legal Profession

Faceted Search

4,129 full-text articles. Page 1 of 60.

Navajo Therapeutic Jurisprudence, James W. Zion 2015 Touro College Jacob D. Fuchsberg Law Center

Navajo Therapeutic Jurisprudence, James W. Zion

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.


Control Or Security: A Therapeutic Approach To The Freedom Of Contract, Yuval Feldman 2015 Touro College Jacob D. Fuchsberg Law Center

Control Or Security: A Therapeutic Approach To The Freedom Of Contract, Yuval Feldman

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.


Constructing A Normative Framework For Therapeutic Jurisprudence Using Social Work Principles As A Model, Robert G. Madden, Raymie H. Wayne 2015 Touro College Jacob D. Fuchsberg Law Center

Constructing A Normative Framework For Therapeutic Jurisprudence Using Social Work Principles As A Model, Robert G. Madden, Raymie H. Wayne

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.


Drug Treatment Court: Therapeutic Jurisprudence Applied, Bruce J. Winick, David B. Wexler 2015 Touro College Jacob D. Fuchsberg Law Center

Drug Treatment Court: Therapeutic Jurisprudence Applied, Bruce J. Winick, David B. Wexler

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.


Jurisprudential Countertransference, Marla Kahn 2015 Touro College Jacob D. Fuchsberg Law Center

Jurisprudential Countertransference, Marla Kahn

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.


Rights Are Not Enough: Therapeutic Jurisprudence Lessons For Law Reformers, Nathalie Des Rosiers 2015 Touro College Jacob D. Fuchsberg Law Center

Rights Are Not Enough: Therapeutic Jurisprudence Lessons For Law Reformers, Nathalie Des Rosiers

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.


Introduction Symposium: The Varieties Of Therapeutic Experience, A.J. Stephani 2015 Touro College Jacob D. Fuchsberg Law Center

Introduction Symposium: The Varieties Of Therapeutic Experience, A.J. Stephani

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.


Friends Of Justice: Does Social Media Impact The Public Perception Of The Justice System?, Nicola A. Boothe-Perry 2015 Florida A&M University College of Law

Friends Of Justice: Does Social Media Impact The Public Perception Of The Justice System?, Nicola A. Boothe-Perry

Pace Law Review

This article will demonstrate how the unregulated use of social media by participants in the justice system (judges, attorneys and jurors specifically) affects the public perception and subsequently the integrity of our justice system. The article will provide a holistic review of social media use by judges, attorneys and jurors, and demonstrate why their use of social media should be harnessed in a manner to ensure compliance with ethical rules and reduce potential negative effects to the social contract between law and society.

Social media is like a culvert. It catches pictures, novelties, personal profiles, gossip, news, unfiltered opinions, and ...


Examining Pay Differentials In The Legal Field, Barbara Donn, Christine Cahill, Meghan H. Mihal 2015 St. Thomas Aquinas College

Examining Pay Differentials In The Legal Field, Barbara Donn, Christine Cahill, Meghan H. Mihal

Indiana Journal of Law and Social Equality

This study investigates pay discrimination towards women in the legal field. Recent research has shown that a pay gap does exist in the legal field, and we show that this gap widens throughout the lawyers’ early careers. For our analysis, we focus on the pay differentials between associate level men and women at large private law firms in the United States. The data used in this study is provided by the American Bar Association and is a nationally representative data set following lawyers who began their legal career in 2000. We show that women earn less than their male counterparts ...


Foreword: Critical Race Theory And Empirical Methods Conference, Kimani Paul-Emile 2015 Fordham University School of Law

Foreword: Critical Race Theory And Empirical Methods Conference, Kimani Paul-Emile

Fordham Law Review

Everyone seems to be talking about race. From the protests that erupted in cities across the country over the failure of grand juries in Missouri and New York to indict police officers in the killing of two unarmed black men, to the racially charged statements made by the owners of professional sports teams; and the college fraternity members captured on film singing a racist lynching song; race exploded into the nation’s collective consciousness. Even the Starbucks Coffee chain’s recent “Race Together” campaign, intended to promote discussion about race, sparked a controversy and was quickly withdrawn. These and other ...


When Is Fear For One's Life Race-Gendered? An Intersectional Analysis Of The Bureau Of Immigration Appeals's In Re A-R-C-G- Decision, Ange-Marie Hancock 2015 University of Southern California

When Is Fear For One's Life Race-Gendered? An Intersectional Analysis Of The Bureau Of Immigration Appeals's In Re A-R-C-G- Decision, Ange-Marie Hancock

Fordham Law Review

In August 2014, the U.S. Board of Immigration Appeals (BIA) handed down a breakthrough decision, In re A-R-C-G-, permitting courts to consider domestic violence as a gendered form of persecution in a home country and thus grounds for asylum in the United States. Along with two other 2014 decisions, In re W-G-R- and In re M-E-V-G-, this case represented a marked shift from prior BIA decisions, which for fifteen years had interpreted sections 208(a) and 241(b)(3) of the Immigration and Naturalization Act more narrowly, thus excluding claims of home country abuse as reasonable grounds to grant ...


The Modern Day Scarlet Letter, Ifeoma Ajunwa 2015 David A. Clarke School of Law, University of the District of Columbia

The Modern Day Scarlet Letter, Ifeoma Ajunwa

Fordham Law Review

American society has come to presuppose the efficacy of the collateral legal consequences of criminal conviction. But little attention has been paid to their effects on the reintegration efforts of the formerly incarcerated and, in particular, formerly incarcerated women. An 1848 case, Sutton v. McIlhany, affirmed collateral legal consequences as constituting an important part of criminal punishment. More recent cases, such as Turner v. Glickman, in which a class of people convicted of drug crimes were subsequently denied food stamps and other government benefits, have upheld the constitutionality of imposing these legal penalties on an individual even after she has ...


Race In The Life Sciences: An Empirical Assessment, 1950-2000, Osagie K. Obasogie, Julie N. Harris-Wai, Katherine Darling, Carolyn Keagy 2015 University of California, Hastings College of the Law

Race In The Life Sciences: An Empirical Assessment, 1950-2000, Osagie K. Obasogie, Julie N. Harris-Wai, Katherine Darling, Carolyn Keagy

Fordham Law Review

The mainstream narrative regarding the evolution of race as an idea in the scientific community is that biological understandings of race dominated throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries up until World War II, after which a social constructionist approach is thought to have taken hold. Many believe that the horrific outcomes of the most notorious applications of biological race—eugenics and the Holocaust—moved scientists away from thinking that race reflects inherent differences and toward an understanding that race is a largely social, cultural, and political phenomenon. This understanding of the evolution of race as a scientific idea informed the ...


Faculty Insights Of Educational Diversity, Meera E. Deo 2015 Thomas Jefferson School of Law

Faculty Insights Of Educational Diversity, Meera E. Deo

Fordham Law Review

Twice in the past two years, the U.S. Supreme Court has approved educational diversity as a compelling state interest that justifies the use of race in higher education admissions decisions. Nevertheless, it remains on somewhat shaky ground. Over the past decade, the Court has emphasized that its acceptance of diversity stems from the expectation that a diverse student body will enhance the classroom environment, with students drawing on their diverse backgrounds during classroom conversations that ultimately bring the law to life. Yet, the Court provides no support for its assumption that admitting and enrolling diverse students actually result in ...


An Interdisciplinary Analysis Of The Use Of Ethical Intuition In Legal Compliance Decisionmaking For Business Entities, Eric C. Chaffee 2015 University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law

An Interdisciplinary Analysis Of The Use Of Ethical Intuition In Legal Compliance Decisionmaking For Business Entities, Eric C. Chaffee

Maryland Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Early Female Jewish Members Of The Maryland Bar: 1920–1929, Deborah Sweet Eyler 2015 University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law

The Early Female Jewish Members Of The Maryland Bar: 1920–1929, Deborah Sweet Eyler

Maryland Law Review

No abstract provided.


An Urban Transformation: Oklahoma City University School Of Law Returns To Its Downtown Roots, Lee Peoples 2015 Oklahoma City University

An Urban Transformation: Oklahoma City University School Of Law Returns To Its Downtown Roots, Lee Peoples

Lee Peoples

No abstract provided.


"I Do For My Kids": Negotiating Race And Racial Inequality In Family Court, Tonya L. Brito, David J. Pate Jr., Jia-Hui Stefanie Wong 2015 University of Wisconsin Law School

"I Do For My Kids": Negotiating Race And Racial Inequality In Family Court, Tonya L. Brito, David J. Pate Jr., Jia-Hui Stefanie Wong

Fordham Law Review

Socio-legal scholarship examining issues of access to justice is currently experiencing a renaissance. Renewed inquiry into this field is urgently needed. Studies confirm that only 20 percent of the legal needs of low- income communities are met and that the vast majority of unrepresented litigants are low income, creating what some call a “justice gap” that has become even more urgent in recent years. State tribunals that deal with high-stakes issues particularly relevant to low-income residents, such as family courts and housing courts, are seeing an increasing number of litigants, the majority of whom are unrepresented.


"First Food" Justice: Racial Disparities In Infant Feeding As Food Oppression, Andrea Freeman 2015 University of Hawai’i William S. Richardson School of Law

"First Food" Justice: Racial Disparities In Infant Feeding As Food Oppression, Andrea Freeman

Fordham Law Review

Tabitha Walrond gave birth to Tyler Isaac Walrond on June 27, 1997, when Tabitha, a black woman from the Bronx, was nineteen years old. Four months before the birth, Tabitha, who received New York public assistance, attempted to enroll Tyler in her health insurance plan (HIP), but encountered a mountain of bureaucratic red tape and errors. After several trips to three different offices in the city, Tabitha still could not get a Medicaid card for Tyler. Tabitha’s city caseworker informed her that she would have to wait until after Tyler’s social security card and birth certificate arrived to ...


Critical Race Science And Critical Race Philosophy Of Science, Paul Gowder 2015 University of Iowa University School of Law

Critical Race Science And Critical Race Philosophy Of Science, Paul Gowder

Fordham Law Review

Over several decades, feminist philosophy of science has revealed the ways in which much of science has proceeded from “mainstream” assumptions that privilege men and other hierarchically superordinate groups and existing socially constructed conceptions of gender. In doing so, it has produced a research program that, while rooted in the post- Kuhnian philosophy and sociology of science that has been taken up by many students of scientific method more generally, has been used to critique great swathes of modern science and to reveal both the biases of the mainstream, and the transformative potential of a science that proceeds from the ...


Digital Commons powered by bepress