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Human Trafficking And Refugee Law, Vladislava Stoyanova 2016 Lund University

Human Trafficking And Refugee Law, Vladislava Stoyanova

Vladislava Stoyanova

No abstract provided.


Rethinking Counterterrorism In The Age Of Isis, Sahar F. Aziz 2016 Texas A&M University School of Law

Rethinking Counterterrorism In The Age Of Isis, Sahar F. Aziz

Sahar F. Aziz

Failing states are havens for terrorism. A toxic combination of social, economic, and political crises attract violent extremist groups to establish bases in these lawless areas. As the groups grow in strength, the violence spreads from the immediate vicinity to the nation, region, and sometimes even other continents. One need only look to the terrorist attacks in New York, London, Madrid, and Paris as proof that terrorists operating out of failing states eventually set their sights on attacking Western capitals. Although the underlying causes of terrorism are often local, the violence is no longer constrained within a particular country or ...


Access To Communication In United States Prisons: Reducing Recidivism Through Expanded Communication Programs With Inmates, Lilie Gross 2016 University of Puget Sound

Access To Communication In United States Prisons: Reducing Recidivism Through Expanded Communication Programs With Inmates, Lilie Gross

Politics & Government Undergraduate Theses

The need for better communication systems in prisons is dire and will reduce recidivism rates in the United States. Not only is communication via phone lines extremely expensive and corrupt, it is almost impossible. Inmates in United States Prisons need this availability and option to communicate with their families and maintain outside relationships. While maintaining healthy and positive relationships is good for inmate's mental health, it also decreases the risk of recidivism. This paper aims to highlight the benefits of phone communication and relationships between inmates and family on the outside for it will decrease the 50% recidivism rate ...


Ebola, Experimental Medicine, Economics, And Ethics: An Evaluation Of International Disease Outbreak Law, Sara L. Dominey 2016 University of Georgia School of Law

Ebola, Experimental Medicine, Economics, And Ethics: An Evaluation Of International Disease Outbreak Law, Sara L. Dominey

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


Human Rights Law And Racial Hate Speech Regulation In Australia: Reform And Replace?, Dr. Alan Berman 2016 Charles Darwin University School of Law

Human Rights Law And Racial Hate Speech Regulation In Australia: Reform And Replace?, Dr. Alan Berman

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


New Judicial Review In Old Europe, Alyssa S. King 2016 Yale University

New Judicial Review In Old Europe, Alyssa S. King

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


Stories From The Margins: Refugees With Disabilities Rebuilding Lives, Brent C. Elder 2016 Syracuse University

Stories From The Margins: Refugees With Disabilities Rebuilding Lives, Brent C. Elder

Brent Elder

First-hand accounts of resettlement are seldom heard from refugees with disabilities. The purpose of this study was to facilitate a space for refugees with disabilities to tell their life histories, and their experiences related to resettlement. A global ethnographic framework was used to gather life history interview data from six refugees with a label of disability who have resettled in the United States. To better understand participants’ life histories, multiple theoretical perspectives were utilized including: critical cultural theory, critical race theory (CRT), critical disability studies (CDS), and disability studies (DS) which helped to interpret and navigate the nebulous intersections of ...


Disaggregating Corpus Christi: The Illiberal Implications Of Hobby Lobby's Right To Free Exercise, Katharine Jackson 2016 Columbia University

Disaggregating Corpus Christi: The Illiberal Implications Of Hobby Lobby's Right To Free Exercise, Katharine Jackson

Katharine Jackson

This paper first examines and critiques the group rights to religious exercise derived from the three ontologies of the corporation suggested by different legal conceptions of corporate personhood often invoked by Courts. Finding the implicated groups rights inimical to individual religious freedom, the paper then presents an argument as to why a discourse of intra-corporate toleration and voluntariness does a better job at protecting religious liberty.


Re-Examining Customary International Law And The Federal Courts: An Introduction, Anthony J. Bellia 2016 Notre Dame Law School

Re-Examining Customary International Law And The Federal Courts: An Introduction, Anthony J. Bellia

Anthony J. Bellia

Legal scholars have debated intensely the role of customary international law in the American federal system. The debate involves serious questions surrounding the United States's constitutional structure, foreign relations, and human rights. Despite an impressive body of scholarship, the debate has stood at an impasse in recent years, without either side garnering a consensus. This symposium–Re-examining Customary International Law and the Federal Courts–aspires to help advance the debate over the status of customary international law in the federal courts.

The symposium received thoughtful and constructive contributions from Professors Curtis A. Bradley, Bradford R. Clark, Andrew Kent, Carlos ...


The Fate Of Armed Resistance Groups After Peace, David C. Williams 2016 Indiana University Maurer School of Law

The Fate Of Armed Resistance Groups After Peace, David C. Williams

Indiana Journal of Constitutional Design

No abstract provided.


Changing Minds: Proselytism, Freedom, And The First Amendment, Richard W. Garnett 2016 Notre Dame Law School

Changing Minds: Proselytism, Freedom, And The First Amendment, Richard W. Garnett

Richard W Garnett

Proselytism is, as Paul Griffiths has observed, a topic enjoying renewed attention in recent years. What's more, the practice, aims, and effects of proselytism are increasingly framed not merely in terms of piety and zeal; they are seen as matters of geopolitical, cultural, and national-security significance as well. Indeed, it is fair to say that one of today's more pressing challenges is the conceptual and practical tangle of religious liberty, free expression, cultural integrity, and political stability. This essay is an effort to unravel that tangle by drawing on the religious-freedom-related work and teaching of the late Pope ...


Arbitrating Human Rights, Roger P. Alford 2016 Notre Dame Law School

Arbitrating Human Rights, Roger P. Alford

Roger P. Alford

The article addresses the vexing problem of holding corporations liable for assisting in the sovereign abuse of human rights. Currently domestic human rights litigation against corporations appears to be a proxy fight in which the accomplice is pursued while the principal evades punishment. Typically the principal malfeasor - the sovereign - is immune from suit because of foreign sovereign immunity. But corporations can be found liable for aiding and abetting those violations. This article suggests a solution to this problem, drawing on principles from contract law and arbitration. If a corporation is found liable for aiding and abetting sovereign abuse, it may ...


Arbitrating Human Rights, Roger P. Alford 2016 Notre Dame Law School

Arbitrating Human Rights, Roger P. Alford

Roger P. Alford

Corporate liability for human rights abuses is one of the most important developments in current international law and practice. With the advent of human rights litigation against corporations, there is now the prospect of a deep-pocket defendant that is complicit in grave human rights abuses, subject to personal jurisdiction, and not immune from suit. Indeed, if a corporation is accused of "aiding and abetting" human rights abuses, this is all but a concession that the corporate actor is not the principal wrong-doer. It is of course possible that this controversial trend toward corporate responsibility may reflect a genuine concern about ...


The Effectiveness Of International Law: Torture And Counterterrorism, Ogechi Joy Anwukah 2016 Golden Gate University School of Law

The Effectiveness Of International Law: Torture And Counterterrorism, Ogechi Joy Anwukah

Annual Survey of International & Comparative Law

This paper sets out to address the following question: to what extent has international law effectively curtailed the practice of torture in a democratic society within the context of the ‘war against terror’? This paper will first provide an overview of the current regime of international law prohibiting torture. Next, this paper will discuss the absolute ban on torture and violations that have occurred in the name of the ‘war against terror.’ This paper will then address the consequences of the use of torture as a counterterrorism measure. Finally, this paper will critically analyze the effectiveness of international law on ...


Children, Armed Violence And Transition: Challenges For International Law & Policy, Mark Drumbl 2016 Transnational Law Institute, Washington & Lee University School of Law

Children, Armed Violence And Transition: Challenges For International Law & Policy, Mark Drumbl

Mark A. Drumbl

No abstract provided.


Between Light And Shadow: The International Law Against Genocide In The International Court Of Justice’S Judgement In Croatia V. Serbia (2015), Ines Gillich 2016 Johannes Gutenberg-University of Mainz, Germany

Between Light And Shadow: The International Law Against Genocide In The International Court Of Justice’S Judgement In Croatia V. Serbia (2015), Ines Gillich

Pace International Law Review

This Article identifies and critically analyzes the contributions the International Court of Justice (ICJ) made to the international law against genocide via the judgment in Application of the Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide (Croatia v. Serbia) of February 3, 2015. This Article elaborates on the concept of genocide—a term that has originally been coined after the Armenian Genocide and the Holocaust—and the protection against this “crime of crimes” under international law. The analysis section of this Article refers to the historical and procedural context of the dispute between Croatia and Serbia in ...


Applying Domestic Statutes To Foreign Conduct: How Much Does Kiobel Touch And Concern The Presumption Against Extraterritorial Application, Jessica Neer McDonald 2016 University of Miami Law School

Applying Domestic Statutes To Foreign Conduct: How Much Does Kiobel Touch And Concern The Presumption Against Extraterritorial Application, Jessica Neer Mcdonald

University of Miami Inter-American Law Review

This paper examines a tumultuous history of applying United States law to foreign conduct in United States federal courts and the impact of recent Supreme Court decisions in this area. Despite its inconsistent application, the presumption against extraterritorial application may bridle Article III courts’ authority of applying domestic law to foreign conduct. Notably, a complicated test of displacing the presumption has emerged from the recent Supreme Court case of Kiobel v. Royal Dutch Petroleum Co., which concerned foreign conduct under the Alien Tort Statute (“ATS”). The test states the presumption is overcome if the foreign conduct “touches and concerns” the ...


The Failure Of The Universal Declaration Of Human Rights, Jacob Dolinger 2016 University of Miami Law School

The Failure Of The Universal Declaration Of Human Rights, Jacob Dolinger

University of Miami Inter-American Law Review

The UN Human Rights Commission dedicated over two years to the drafting of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which was approved by the General Assembly in 1948.

The underlying reason for the Declaration was the genocide executed by Hitler’s Nazi Germany against the Jewish people throughout Europe during the Second World War. The fundamental mistake of the Commission was that the persecution by the Nazis was not directed against individual persons, but against an entire people, whereas the Declaration deals exclusively with the rights of the individual human being, no reference whatsoever made in the document to collectivities ...


The United States And The International Criminal Court: A Complicated, Uneasy, Yet At Times Engaging Relationship, Leila Nadya Sadat, Mark A. Drumbl 2016 Washington University School of Law in St. Louis

The United States And The International Criminal Court: A Complicated, Uneasy, Yet At Times Engaging Relationship, Leila Nadya Sadat, Mark A. Drumbl

Mark A. Drumbl

The United States is not a party to the International Criminal Court and this Article demonstrates that it has a complicated relationship to questions of complementarity in the Rome Statute. Federal and (to a small degree) state criminal law in the United States codifies some of the crimes that, conceptually, relate to conduct proscribed in the Rome Statute, but coverage is incomplete and jurisdiction may often be lacking. Thus, the United States is able to prosecute a limited number of ICC crimes in federal courts as such, particularly genocide, torture, and some war crimes including the recruitment or use of ...


The Power Of Legal And Historical Fiction(S): The Daniels Decision And The Enduring Influence Of Colonial Ideology, Brenda Macdougall 2016 University of Ottawa

The Power Of Legal And Historical Fiction(S): The Daniels Decision And The Enduring Influence Of Colonial Ideology, Brenda Macdougall

The International Indigenous Policy Journal

It’s been several months since the Supreme Court of Canada (SCC) rendered its judgment in Daniels v. Canada (2016), affirming that the term “Indian” in s. 91(24) of the Constitution Act (1867) includes Métis and Non-Status Indians. There is a general hope that the decision marks a turning point for Métis and Non-Status Indians within Canada’s colonial structures. I’m not certain this optimism is justified. The judgment was reached based on the types of historical evidence presented and, consequently, there are a couple of statements within the written judgment that give me pause to question how ...


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