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(Un)Civil Denaturalization, Cassandra Burke Robertson, Irina D. Manta 2019 Case Western University School of Law

(Un)Civil Denaturalization, Cassandra Burke Robertson, Irina D. Manta

Faculty Publications

Over the last fifty years, naturalized citizens in the United States were able to feel a sense of finality and security in their rights. Denaturalization, wielded frequently as a political tool in the McCarthy era, had become exceedingly rare. Indeed, denaturalization was best known as an adjunct to criminal proceedings brought against former Nazis and other war criminals who had entered the country under false pretenses.


Denaturalization is no longer so rare. Naturalized citizens’ sense of security has been fundamentally shaken by policy developments in the last five years. The number of denaturalization cases is growing, and if current trends ...


California Divided: The Restrictions And Vulnerabilities In Implementing Sb 54, 26 Asian Am. L.J. ___ (Forthcoming In 2019)., Nicholas Pavlovic, Jerome Ma 2018 SCU Law Class of 2019

California Divided: The Restrictions And Vulnerabilities In Implementing Sb 54, 26 Asian Am. L.J. ___ (Forthcoming In 2019)., Nicholas Pavlovic, Jerome Ma

Immigration Law & Policy Practicum Projects

United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement (“ICE”) significantly relies on state and local personnel and resources to carry out enforcement of immigration law. California Senate Bill 54 (“SB 54”), the “California Values Act,” is California’s attempt to disentangle local law enforcement from federal civil immigration enforcement.

This Article offers an in-depth evaluation of SB 54’s mechanics; identifies vulnerabilities that exist despite SB 54 and potential means for law enforcement agencies (“LEAs”) to combat these issues; and comments on how local individual LEAs and the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation have chosen to exercise the discretion to comply ...


“They’Re Bringing Crime:” White Fear And Closing Borders, Hanna Rosenheimer 2018 Chapman University

“They’Re Bringing Crime:” White Fear And Closing Borders, Hanna Rosenheimer

Student Scholar Symposium Abstracts and Posters

Leading up to the 2016 election, popular rhetoric surrounding immigrants to the United States took a marked turn. This change can be partially explained using Piotr Cap’s proximization theory, a threat-based discursive model that relies on locating threatening events in proximity to the audience in order to justify preventative or protective measures. Quantitative public opinion data from the Chapman University Survey of American Fears suggests that a disbelief in immigrants’ ability to assimilate is strongly correlated with a fear of immigrants committing crimes. White Americans who hold these beliefs typically tend to favor or strongly favor preemptive punitive action ...


Redefining “Particularly Serious Crimes” In Refugee Law, Mary Holper 2018 University of Florida Levin College of Law

Redefining “Particularly Serious Crimes” In Refugee Law, Mary Holper

Florida Law Review

Refugees are not protected from deportation if they have been convicted of a “particularly serious crime” (PSC) which renders them a danger to the community. This raises questions about the meaning of “particularly serious” and “danger to the community.” The Board of Immigration Appeals, Attorney General, and Congress have interpreted PSC quite broadly, leaving many refugees vulnerable to deportation without any consideration of the risk of persecution in their cases. This trend is disturbing as a matter of refugee law, but it is even more disturbing because it demonstrates how certain criminal law trends have played out in immigration law ...


Sanctuaries As Equitable Delegation In An Era Of Mass Immigration Enforcement, Jason A. Cade 2018 Northwestern Pritzker School of Law

Sanctuaries As Equitable Delegation In An Era Of Mass Immigration Enforcement, Jason A. Cade

Northwestern University Law Review

Opponents of—and sometimes advocates for—sanctuary policies describe them as obstructions to the operation of federal immigration law. This premise is flawed. On the better view, the sanctuary movement comports with, rather than fights against, dominant new themes in federal immigration law. A key theme—emerging both in judicial doctrine and on-the-ground practice—focuses on maintaining legitimacy by fostering adherence to equitable norms in enforcement decision-making processes. Against this backdrop, the sanctuary efforts of cities, churches, and campuses are best seen as measures necessary to inject normative (and sometimes legal) accuracy into real-world immigration enforcement decision-making. Sanctuaries can erect ...


Administrative Chaos: Responding To Child Refugees—U.S. Immigration Process In Crisis, Lenni B. Benson 2018 New York Law School

Administrative Chaos: Responding To Child Refugees—U.S. Immigration Process In Crisis, Lenni B. Benson

Washington and Lee Law Review

No abstract provided.


Immigrant Defense Funds For Utopians, César Cuauhtémoc García Hernández 2018 University of Denver Sturm College of Law

Immigrant Defense Funds For Utopians, César Cuauhtémoc García Hernández

Washington and Lee Law Review

No abstract provided.


Judicial Review Of Disproportionate (Or Retaliatory) Deportation, Jason A. Cade 2018 University of Georgia School of Law

Judicial Review Of Disproportionate (Or Retaliatory) Deportation, Jason A. Cade

Washington and Lee Law Review

No abstract provided.


287(G) Agreements In The Trump Era, Huyen Pham 2018 Texas A&M University School of Law

287(G) Agreements In The Trump Era, Huyen Pham

Washington and Lee Law Review

No abstract provided.


Expedited Removal And Due Process: “A Testing Crucible Of Basic Principle” In The Time Of Trump, Daniel Kanstroom 2018 Boston College Law School

Expedited Removal And Due Process: “A Testing Crucible Of Basic Principle” In The Time Of Trump, Daniel Kanstroom

Washington and Lee Law Review

No abstract provided.


Sanctuary Networks And Integrative Enforcement, Ming Hsu Chen 2018 Washington and Lee University School of Law

Sanctuary Networks And Integrative Enforcement, Ming Hsu Chen

Washington and Lee Law Review

My intended focus is on the widespread response—in cities, churches, campuses, and corporations that together comprise “sanctuary networks”1—to the Trump Administration’s Executive Order 13768 Enhancing Public Safety in the Interior of the United States2 as an instance of the changing relationship between federal, local, and private organizations in the regulation of immigration. After briefly covering the legal background of the Trump Interior E.O., the focus of the Article shifts to the institutional dynamics arising in communities. These institutional dynamics exemplify the beginnings of a reimagined immigration enforcement policy with a more integrative flavor.


Deconstructing “Sanctuary Cities”: The Legality Of Federal Grant Conditions That Require State And Local Cooperation On Immigration Enforcement, Peter Margulies 2018 Roger Williams University School of Law

Deconstructing “Sanctuary Cities”: The Legality Of Federal Grant Conditions That Require State And Local Cooperation On Immigration Enforcement, Peter Margulies

Washington and Lee Law Review

No abstract provided.


National Security, Immigration And The Muslim Bans, Shoba Sivaprasad Wadhia 2018 Penn State Law, University Park

National Security, Immigration And The Muslim Bans, Shoba Sivaprasad Wadhia

Washington and Lee Law Review

No abstract provided.


Study Group On Immigrant Representation: The First Decade, Robert A. Katzmann 2018 Chief Judge, U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit

Study Group On Immigrant Representation: The First Decade, Robert A. Katzmann

Fordham Law Review

All of us here have a common goal: ensuring adequate legal representation of the immigrant poor. A courtroom has multiple players with different roles, but all would agree that adequate legal representation of the parties is essential to the fair and effective administration of justice. Deficient representation frustrates the work of courts and ill serves litigants. All too often, and throughout the country, courts that address immigration matters must contend with such a breakdown in legal representation, a crisis of massive proportions with severe, tragic costs to immigrants and their families. For our nation’s immigrants, the urgent need for ...


Universal Representation, Lindsay Nash 2018 Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law

Universal Representation, Lindsay Nash

Fordham Law Review

In an era in which there is little good news for immigrant communities and even holding the line has become an ambitious goal, one progressive project has continued to gain steam: the movement to provide universal representation for noncitizens in removal proceedings. This effort, initially born out of a pilot project in New York City, has generated a host of replication projects throughout the nation and holds the promise of even broader expansion. But as it grows, this effort must confront challenges from within: the sort-of supporters who want to limit this representation system’s coverage in a number of ...


A National Study Of Immigration Detention In The United States, Emily Ryo, Ian Peacock 2018 University of Southern California Law

A National Study Of Immigration Detention In The United States, Emily Ryo, Ian Peacock

Emily Ryo

Amidst growing reports of abuses and rights violations in immigration detention, the Trump administration has sought to expand the use of immigration detention to facilitate its deportation policy. This study offers the first comprehensive empirical analysis of U.S. immigration detention at the national level. Drawing on administrative records and geocoded data pertaining to all noncitizens who were detained by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement in fiscal year 2015, we examine who the detainees are, where they were held, and what happened to them.


Finally Freed Or Infinitely Detained? The Need For A Clear Standard Of Finality For Reinstated Orders Of Removal, John Gavin 2018 Boston College Law School

Finally Freed Or Infinitely Detained? The Need For A Clear Standard Of Finality For Reinstated Orders Of Removal, John Gavin

Boston College Law Review

Circuits are currently split as to whether reinstated orders of removal are final orders of removal. The resolution of this circuit split and related legislative ambiguity has far-reaching implications for the rights of the 150,000 or more unauthorized immigrants who enter the United States each year. Reinstated orders of removal are a means by which the United States government can more rapidly deport individuals who reenter the country after having been previously deported. On July 29, 2016, in Guerra v. Shanahan, the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit declared that reinstated orders of removal are not ...


At Oral Argument, Supreme Court Weighs Immigrant Detention, Peter Margulies 2018 Roger Williams University School of Law

At Oral Argument, Supreme Court Weighs Immigrant Detention, Peter Margulies

Law Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Cracking Down On Cages: Feminist And Prison Abolitionist Considerations For Litigating Solitary Confinement In Canada, Winnie Phillips-Osei 2018 Western University

Cracking Down On Cages: Feminist And Prison Abolitionist Considerations For Litigating Solitary Confinement In Canada, Winnie Phillips-Osei

Master of Laws Research Papers Repository

Guided by prison abolition ethic and intersectional feminism, my key argument is that Charter section 15 is the ideal means of eradicating solitary confinement and its adverse impact on women who are Aboriginal, racialized, mentally ill, or immigration detainees. I utilize a provincial superior court’s failing in exploring a discrimination analysis concerning Aboriginal women, to illustrate my key argument. However, because of the piecemeal fashion in which courts can effect developments in the law, the abolition of solitary confinement may very well occur through a series of ‘little wins’. In Chapter 11, I provide a constitutional analysis, arguing that ...


A Life Absolutely Bare? A Reflection On Resistance By Irregular Refugees Against Fingerprinting As State Biopolitical Control In The European Union, Ziang Zhou 2018 University of California, Berkeley

A Life Absolutely Bare? A Reflection On Resistance By Irregular Refugees Against Fingerprinting As State Biopolitical Control In The European Union, Ziang Zhou

Claremont-UC Undergraduate Research Conference on the European Union

In a legally transitory category, irregular refugees- experience a double precariousness. They risk their lives to travel across treacherous seas to Europe for a better life. However, upon the long-awaited embarkation on the European land, they are exposed once again to the precariousness of the asylum application. They are “powerless”, “with no rights” and “to be sacrificed” as Giorgio Agamben and Hannah Arendt suggested in their respective understanding of a “bare life”, la nuda vita. In light of the administrative difficulties in managing asylum application, the European Union introduced the “Dublin Agreement”, which stipulates mandatory biometric data collection for irregular ...


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