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#Snitches Get Stitches: Witness Intimidation In The Age Of Facebook And Twitter, John Browning 2015 Passman & Jones

#Snitches Get Stitches: Witness Intimidation In The Age Of Facebook And Twitter, John Browning

Pace Law Review

In order to better understand witness intimidation in the age of social media, one must examine both the forms it has taken as well as the response by law enforcement and the criminal justice system. As this article points out, the digital age has brought with it a host of new ways in which witnesses may be subjected to online harassment and intimidation across multiple platforms, and those means have been used to target not only victims and fact witnesses but even prosecutors and expert witnesses as well. The article will also examine potential responses to the problem of witness ...


Friends Of Justice: Does Social Media Impact The Public Perception Of The Justice System?, Nicola A. Boothe-Perry 2015 Florida A&M University College of Law

Friends Of Justice: Does Social Media Impact The Public Perception Of The Justice System?, Nicola A. Boothe-Perry

Pace Law Review

This article will demonstrate how the unregulated use of social media by participants in the justice system (judges, attorneys and jurors specifically) affects the public perception and subsequently the integrity of our justice system. The article will provide a holistic review of social media use by judges, attorneys and jurors, and demonstrate why their use of social media should be harnessed in a manner to ensure compliance with ethical rules and reduce potential negative effects to the social contract between law and society.

Social media is like a culvert. It catches pictures, novelties, personal profiles, gossip, news, unfiltered opinions, and ...


Innovation Paper: Improving Timeliness In The Justice System, Australian Centre for Justice Innovation (ACJI) 2015 Australian Centre for Justice Innovation

Innovation Paper: Improving Timeliness In The Justice System, Australian Centre For Justice Innovation (Acji)

Timeliness in the Justice System: Ideas and Innovations

In Australia and elsewhere, concerns have been expressed for many years that it can take too long to deal with disputes in the justice system. Numerous strategies have been introduced to address these concerns and reduce delay, including the use of more effective technologies; effecting cultural change that imposes obligations on courts, litigants and others to support more timely finalisation of disputes; better management of cases and disputes; promoting earlier dispute resolution through the use of alternative dispute resolution (ADR); and reconfiguring the roles of those within the justice system as well as imposing decreasing incentives that may operate to ...


Cultural Bias In Judicial Decision Making, Masua Sagiv 2015 Buchmann Faculty of Law, Tel Aviv University

Cultural Bias In Judicial Decision Making, Masua Sagiv

Boston College Journal of Law & Social Justice

This Essay describes the phenomenon of cultural bias in judicial decision making, and examines the use of testimonies and opinions of cultural experts as a way to diminish this bias. The Essay compares the legal regimes of the United States and Israel. Whereas in the United States, the general practice of using cultural experts in courts is well developed and regulated, the Israeli legal procedure has no formal method for admitting cultural expert testimony, and examples of opinions or testimonies of cultural experts in the Israeli legal system are sporadic. The Essay further argues that social science evidence is an ...


Judicial Activism’S Effect On Judicial Elections, Nick Fernandes 2015 Chapman University

Judicial Activism’S Effect On Judicial Elections, Nick Fernandes

Student Research Day Abstracts and Posters

High profile Supreme Court cases have become increasingly commonplace, particularly with the Citizens United court decision granting unprecedented rights to corporations. Many in the media have decried these as examples of increasing “judicial activism”. This trend has trickled down to the state supreme courts as justices have increasingly played a more active role in developing policy. Gay marriage has become legalized in numerous states due to this trend. While public sentiment is unlikely to affect the appointed Supreme Court, it could have a substantial impact on state judicial elections.

This paper will specifically be looking at judicial elections in Kentucky ...


Supreme Court Institute Annual Report, 2014-2015, Georgetown University Law Center, Supreme Court Institute 2015 Georgetown University Law Center

Supreme Court Institute Annual Report, 2014-2015, Georgetown University Law Center, Supreme Court Institute

SCI Papers & Reports

During the 2014-2015 academic year-–corresponding to the U.S. Supreme Court’s October Term (OT) 2014-–the Supreme Court Institute (SCI) provided moot courts for advocates in 100% of the cases heard by the Supreme Court, offered a variety of programs related to the Supreme Court, and continued to integrate the moot court program into the education of Georgetown Law students. A list of all SCI moot courts held in OT 2014-–arranged by argument sitting and date of moot and including the name and affiliation of each advocate and the number of observers-–follows the narrative portion of ...


Expertise And Opinion Assignment On The Courts Of Appeals: A Preliminary Investigation, Jonathan Remy Nash 2015 University of Florida Levin College of Law

Expertise And Opinion Assignment On The Courts Of Appeals: A Preliminary Investigation, Jonathan Remy Nash

Florida Law Review

This Article examines the role of expertise in judicial opinion assignment and offers four contributions: First, this Article develops a general theory of opinion assignment on multimember courts. Second, this Article uses that theory to predict how expertise might influence opinion assignment. Third, because the theory advanced in this Article suggests that the courts of appeals are far more likely to witness experience-based opinion assignment than is the Supreme Court, this Article contributes to an understanding of opinion assignment practices in this understudied area. Fourth, this Article identifies two settings in which the theory this Article advances should have observable ...


A Fourth Amendment Framework For The Fee Exercise Clause, Adam Lamparello 2015 Indiana Tech Law School

A Fourth Amendment Framework For The Fee Exercise Clause, Adam Lamparello

Adam Lamparello

This article proposes a paradigm for resolving disputes under the free exercise clause that is analogous to the framework used by the court under the fourth amendment when balancing privacy rights against investigatory powers of law enforcement. In its Fourth Amendment jurisprudence, the Court provides varying degrees of protection to privacy – and imposes different evidentiary requirements on law enforcement – depending on the context in which privacy is affected, the intrusiveness of a particular search, and the asserted governmental interests. For example, privacy receives the strongest protections in areas such as the home, thus requiring law enforcement to have probable cause ...


A Proposal For Improving Argument Before The United States Supreme Court, Louis J. Sirico Jr. 2015 Pepperdine University

A Proposal For Improving Argument Before The United States Supreme Court, Louis J. Sirico Jr.

Pepperdine Law Review

This Article offers a simple solution for reducing the overload of questions at oral argument. Justices, individually or collectively, could pose written questions on facts and law to the litigants' counsel before oral argument and expect written responses. The submitted questions might inquire about the facts of the case, about the litigant's interpretation of the relevant law, about the response that the litigant would make to a hypothetical scenario, or about the precise holding that the litigant wishes the Court to propound. The responses should allow for more thought-out answers than oral argument can produce and might both reduce ...


Access To National Security Information Under The U.S. Freedom Of Information Act, Stephen J. Schulhofer 2015 NYU School of Law

Access To National Security Information Under The U.S. Freedom Of Information Act, Stephen J. Schulhofer

New York University Public Law and Legal Theory Working Papers

Nations throughout the world permit executive officials to maintain secrecy in matters touching “national security.” And secrecy’s potential for eroding democratic values is growing as conceptions of national security expand. The U.S. Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) offers tools to resist that trend. The present paper, prepared for an International Symposium on “Freedom of Information and Governmental Transparency,” examines FOIA practice in national-security cases. Although U.S. courts do not always pursue their FOIA responsibilities aggressively, they frequently succeed in forcing the release of significant, previously classified material. An active judicial check on national security secrecy therefore is ...


A Simple Theory Of Complex Valuation, Anthony J. Casey, Julia Simon-Kerr 2015 University of Chicago Law School

A Simple Theory Of Complex Valuation, Anthony J. Casey, Julia Simon-Kerr

Michigan Law Review

Complex valuations of assets, companies, government programs, damages, and the like cannot be done without expertise, yet judges routinely pick an arbitrary value that falls somewhere between the extreme numbers suggested by competing experts. This creates costly uncertainty and undermines the legitimacy of the court. Proposals to remedy this well-recognized difficulty have become increasingly convoluted. As a result, no solution has been effectively adopted and the problem persists. This Article suggests that the valuation dilemma stems from a misconception of the inquiry involved. Courts have treated valuation as its own special type of inquiry distinct from traditional fact-finding. We show ...


"Home Rule" Vs. "Dillon's Rule" For Washington Cities, Hugh Spitzer 2015 Seattle University School of Law

"Home Rule" Vs. "Dillon's Rule" For Washington Cities, Hugh Spitzer

Seattle University Law Review

This Article focuses on the tension between the late-nineteenth century “Dillon’s Rule” limiting city powers, and the “home rule” approach that gained traction in the early and mid-twentieth century. Washington’s constitution allows cities to exercise all the police powers possessed by the state government, so long as local regulations do not conflict with general laws. The constitution also vests charter cities with control over their form of government. But all city powers are subject to “general laws” adopted by the legislature. Further, judicial rulings on city powers to provide public services have fluctuated, ranging from decisions citing the ...


The Roberts Court And Penumbral Federalism, Edward Cantu 2015 The Catholic University of America, Columbus School of Law

The Roberts Court And Penumbral Federalism, Edward Cantu

Catholic University Law Review

For several decades the Court has invoked “state dignity” to animate federalism reasoning in isolated doctrinal contexts. Recent Roberts Court decisions suggest that a focus on state dignity, prestige, status, and similar ethereal concepts—which derive from a “penumbral” reading of the Tenth Amendment—represent the budding of a different doctrinal approach to federalism generally. This article terms this new approach “penumbral federalism,” an approach less concerned with delineating state from federal regulatory turf, and more concerned with maintaining the states as viable competitors for the respect and loyalty of the citizenry.

After fleshing out what “penumbral federalism” is and ...


O'Connor's Firsts, Phyllis Crocker 2015 University of Akron

O'Connor's Firsts, Phyllis Crocker

Akron Law Review

No abstract provided.


Chief Justice O'Connor's Juvenile Justice Jurisprudence: A Consistent Approach To Inconsistent Interests, Yvette McGee-Brown, Kimberly Jolson 2015 University of Akron

Chief Justice O'Connor's Juvenile Justice Jurisprudence: A Consistent Approach To Inconsistent Interests, Yvette Mcgee-Brown, Kimberly Jolson

Akron Law Review

No abstract provided.


City Of Norwood V. Horney - Much More Than Eminent Domain: A Foreceful Affirmation Of The Independent Authority Of The Ohio Constitution And The Court's Power To Enforce It, Kathleen Trafford 2015 University of Akron

City Of Norwood V. Horney - Much More Than Eminent Domain: A Foreceful Affirmation Of The Independent Authority Of The Ohio Constitution And The Court's Power To Enforce It, Kathleen Trafford

Akron Law Review

No abstract provided.


Flexible Predictability: Stare Decisis In Ohio, Richard Garner 2015 University of Akron

Flexible Predictability: Stare Decisis In Ohio, Richard Garner

Akron Law Review

No abstract provided.


Judge Levine: A Survey Of His Most Influential Court Of Appeals Decisions - 1993-2002, Jean D'Alessandro 2015 Touro College Jacob D. Fuchsberg Law Center

Judge Levine: A Survey Of His Most Influential Court Of Appeals Decisions - 1993-2002, Jean D'Alessandro

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.


R V Fearon Case Commentary, Western Journal of Legal Studies Editorial Board 2015 Western University

R V Fearon Case Commentary, Western Journal Of Legal Studies Editorial Board

Western Journal of Legal Studies

The widespread use of smart phones and similar devices for data management has created significant constitutional and criminal law issues. This is evident in the context of protection by the Charter with respect to unreasonable search and seizure. When an individual’s section 8 rights are breached, an assessment of the admissibility of evidence under section 24(2) of the Charter is required. In R v Fearon, the Supreme Court of Canada established new limits on the police power to search cell phones and similar devices incident to arrest. Cromwell J stated that these measures do not “represent the only ...


En El Juego De La Designación De Ministros, El Presidente Siempre Gana, Javier Martín Reyes 2015 Columbia University

En El Juego De La Designación De Ministros, El Presidente Siempre Gana, Javier Martín Reyes

Javier Martín Reyes

In the Supreme Court Appointment Game, the President Always Wins


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