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A Proposal For Improving Argument Before The United States Supreme Court, Louis J. Sirico Jr. 2015 Pepperdine University

A Proposal For Improving Argument Before The United States Supreme Court, Louis J. Sirico Jr.

Pepperdine Law Review

This Article offers a simple solution for reducing the overload of questions at oral argument. Justices, individually or collectively, could pose written questions on facts and law to the litigants' counsel before oral argument and expect written responses. The submitted questions might inquire about the facts of the case, about the litigant's interpretation of the relevant law, about the response that the litigant would make to a hypothetical scenario, or about the precise holding that the litigant wishes the Court to propound. The responses should allow for more thought-out answers than oral argument can produce and might both reduce ...


"Home Rule" Vs. "Dillon's Rule" For Washington Cities, Hugh Spitzer 2015 Seattle University School of Law

"Home Rule" Vs. "Dillon's Rule" For Washington Cities, Hugh Spitzer

Seattle University Law Review

This Article focuses on the tension between the late-nineteenth century “Dillon’s Rule” limiting city powers, and the “home rule” approach that gained traction in the early and mid-twentieth century. Washington’s constitution allows cities to exercise all the police powers possessed by the state government, so long as local regulations do not conflict with general laws. The constitution also vests charter cities with control over their form of government. But all city powers are subject to “general laws” adopted by the legislature. Further, judicial rulings on city powers to provide public services have fluctuated, ranging from decisions citing the ...


The Roberts Court And Penumbral Federalism, Edward Cantu 2015 The Catholic University of America, Columbus School of Law

The Roberts Court And Penumbral Federalism, Edward Cantu

Catholic University Law Review

For several decades the Court has invoked “state dignity” to animate federalism reasoning in isolated doctrinal contexts. Recent Roberts Court decisions suggest that a focus on state dignity, prestige, status, and similar ethereal concepts—which derive from a “penumbral” reading of the Tenth Amendment—represent the budding of a different doctrinal approach to federalism generally. This article terms this new approach “penumbral federalism,” an approach less concerned with delineating state from federal regulatory turf, and more concerned with maintaining the states as viable competitors for the respect and loyalty of the citizenry.

After fleshing out what “penumbral federalism” is and ...


O'Connor's Firsts, Phyllis Crocker 2015 University of Akron

O'Connor's Firsts, Phyllis Crocker

Akron Law Review

No abstract provided.


Chief Justice O'Connor's Juvenile Justice Jurisprudence: A Consistent Approach To Inconsistent Interests, Yvette McGee-Brown, Kimberly Jolson 2015 University of Akron

Chief Justice O'Connor's Juvenile Justice Jurisprudence: A Consistent Approach To Inconsistent Interests, Yvette Mcgee-Brown, Kimberly Jolson

Akron Law Review

No abstract provided.


City Of Norwood V. Horney - Much More Than Eminent Domain: A Foreceful Affirmation Of The Independent Authority Of The Ohio Constitution And The Court's Power To Enforce It, Kathleen Trafford 2015 University of Akron

City Of Norwood V. Horney - Much More Than Eminent Domain: A Foreceful Affirmation Of The Independent Authority Of The Ohio Constitution And The Court's Power To Enforce It, Kathleen Trafford

Akron Law Review

No abstract provided.


Flexible Predictability: Stare Decisis In Ohio, Richard Garner 2015 University of Akron

Flexible Predictability: Stare Decisis In Ohio, Richard Garner

Akron Law Review

No abstract provided.


Judge Levine: A Survey Of His Most Influential Court Of Appeals Decisions - 1993-2002, Jean D'Alessandro 2015 Touro College Jacob D. Fuchsberg Law Center

Judge Levine: A Survey Of His Most Influential Court Of Appeals Decisions - 1993-2002, Jean D'Alessandro

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.


R V Fearon Case Commentary, Western Journal of Legal Studies Editorial Board 2015 Western University

R V Fearon Case Commentary, Western Journal Of Legal Studies Editorial Board

Western Journal of Legal Studies

The widespread use of smart phones and similar devices for data management has created significant constitutional and criminal law issues. This is evident in the context of protection by the Charter with respect to unreasonable search and seizure. When an individual’s section 8 rights are breached, an assessment of the admissibility of evidence under section 24(2) of the Charter is required. In R v Fearon, the Supreme Court of Canada established new limits on the police power to search cell phones and similar devices incident to arrest. Cromwell J stated that these measures do not “represent the only ...


En El Juego De La Designación De Ministros, El Presidente Siempre Gana, Javier Martín Reyes 2015 Columbia University

En El Juego De La Designación De Ministros, El Presidente Siempre Gana, Javier Martín Reyes

Javier Martín Reyes

In the Supreme Court Appointment Game, the President Always Wins


Newsroom: Groundbreaking Jurist To Keynote Commencement '15, Roger Williams University School of Law 2015 Roger Williams University

Newsroom: Groundbreaking Jurist To Keynote Commencement '15, Roger Williams University School Of Law

Life of the Law School (1993- )

No abstract provided.


The Hypocrisy Of "Equal But Separate" In The Courtroom: A Lens For The Civil Rights Era, Jaimie K. McFarlin 2015 Harvard University

The Hypocrisy Of "Equal But Separate" In The Courtroom: A Lens For The Civil Rights Era, Jaimie K. Mcfarlin

Jaimie K. McFarlin

This article serves to examine the role of the courthouse during the Jim Crow Era and the early stages of the Civil Rights Movement, as courthouses fulfilled their dual function of minstreling Plessy’s call for “equality under the law” and orchestrating overt segregation.


Newsroom: A Closer Look At Mass Incarceration, Roger Williams University School of Law 2015 Roger Williams University

Newsroom: A Closer Look At Mass Incarceration, Roger Williams University School Of Law

Life of the Law School (1993- )

No abstract provided.


Judge Posner's Simple Law, Mitchell N. Berman 2015 University of Pennsylvania Law School

Judge Posner's Simple Law, Mitchell N. Berman

Michigan Law Review

The world is complex, Richard Posner observes in his most recent book, Reflections on Judging. It follows that, for judges to achieve “sensible” resolutions of real-world disputes—by which Judge Posner means “in a way that can be explained in ordinary language and justified as consistent with the expectations of normal people” (p. 354)—they must be able to navigate the world’s complexity successfully. To apply legal rules correctly and (where judicial lawmaking is called for) to formulate legal rules prudently, judges must understand the causal mechanisms and processes that undergird complex systems, and they must be able to ...


Six Overrulings, Andrew Koppelman 2015 Northwestern University School of Law

Six Overrulings, Andrew Koppelman

Michigan Law Review

John Paul Stevens, who retired in 2010 at the age of ninety after more than thirty-four years on the Supreme Court, has capped his astoundingly distinguished career by becoming an important public intellectual. He reviews books, gives high-profile interviews, wrote a memoir of the chief justices he has known, and has now written a second book. Six Amendments revisits half a dozen old, lost battles. Stevens appeals over the heads of his colleagues to a higher authority: the public. Now that he is off the Court, Stevens explains why six decisions in which he dissented should be overruled by constitutional ...


Can Judges Make Reliable Numeric Judgments? Distorted Damages And Skewed Sentences, Jeffrey J. Rachlinski, Andrew J. Wistrich, Chris Guthrie 2015 Cornell University Law School

Can Judges Make Reliable Numeric Judgments? Distorted Damages And Skewed Sentences, Jeffrey J. Rachlinski, Andrew J. Wistrich, Chris Guthrie

Indiana Law Journal

In a series of studies involving over six hundred trial judges in three countries, we demonstrate that trial judges’ civil damage awards and criminal sentences are subject to influences that make them erratic. We found that the presence of misleading numeric reference points (or “anchors”) affected judges’ decisions in a series of hypothetical cases. Specifically, judges imposed shorter sentences when assigning sentences in months rather than in years; awarded higher amounts of compensatory damages when informed of a cap on damage awards; imposed different sentences depending upon the sequence in which criminal cases were presented to them; and were influenced ...


Deciding, Curtis E.A. Karnow 2015 California Superior Court (San Francisco)

Deciding, Curtis E.A. Karnow

Curtis E.A. Karnow

Review of cognitive fallacies judges may encounter, such as expectation fallacies, cognitive dissonance, narrative fallacies and generally problems with associative reasoning


Randomized Judicial Review, Andrei Marmor 2015 BLR

Randomized Judicial Review, Andrei Marmor

University of Southern California Legal Studies Working Paper Series

One of the main arguments in support of constitutional judicial review points to the need to curtail the legal and political power of majority rule instantiated by democratic legislative institutions. This article aims to challenge the counter majoritarian argument for judicial review by showing that there is very little difference, at least morally speaking, between the current structure of constitutional judicial review in the US, and a system that would impose limits on majoritarian decisions procedures by an entirely randomized mechanism. The argument is based on a hypothetical model of a randomized system of judicial review, and proceeds to show ...


The Case For Writing International Law Into The U.S. Code, John F. Coyle 2015 University of North Carolina Law School

The Case For Writing International Law Into The U.S. Code, John F. Coyle

Boston College Law Review

In recent years, the U.S. judiciary has taken steps to limit the role played by international law in the U.S. legal system. This Article seeks to explain this retreat and to identify ways by which it may be reversed. It argues first that the present judicial retreat from international law is attributable to two causes: judicial attitudes and judicial inexperience. Many judges have expressed some degree of ambivalence—occasionally rising to the level of hostility—about relying upon international law to provide a rule of decision. At the same time, many judges are largely unfamiliar with an ever-expanding ...


Jury Sentencing And Juveniles: Eighth Amendment Limits And Sixth Amendment Rights, Sarah French Russell 2015 Quinnipiac University School of Law

Jury Sentencing And Juveniles: Eighth Amendment Limits And Sixth Amendment Rights, Sarah French Russell

Boston College Law Review

Across the country, states are grappling with how to comply with the U.S. Supreme Court’s recent decision in Miller v. Alabama, which held that mandatory life-without-parole sentences for juveniles violate the Eighth Amendment. Following Miller, it appears a sentencer may impose life without parole on a juvenile homicide offender only in those rare instances in which the sentencer determines, after considering the mitigating qualities of youth, that the juvenile’s crime reflects “irreparable corruption.” Courts are preparing to conduct resentencing hearings in states nationwide, and new cases where juveniles face the possibility of life in prison are entering ...


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