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A Degree Of Pro-Ip Preference: An Empirical Study Of The Relationship Between Federal Judges' Undergraduate Programs And Their Trade Secret Decisions, Christopher P. Dinkel 2024 Oklahoma State University

A Degree Of Pro-Ip Preference: An Empirical Study Of The Relationship Between Federal Judges' Undergraduate Programs And Their Trade Secret Decisions, Christopher P. Dinkel

West Virginia Law Review

While the previous literature has found that certain background characteristics of federal judges, such as their race, gender, and ideology, statistically correlate with case outcomes, little prior scholarship has examined the connection between judges’ educational backgrounds and their judicial decision-making. The empirical study that this Article presents fills a critical gap in the literature by statistically analyzing the relationship between federal judges’ undergraduate degrees and their rulings in cases related to trade secrets, a highly valuable form of intellectual property (IP) for many companies. Notably, it finds that if a trade secret case is assigned to a judge who possesses …


No Need To Reinvent The Wheel: The Positive Relationship Between Green Technology And Patient Enforcement, Addison S. Fowler 2024 Villanova University Charles Widger School of Law

No Need To Reinvent The Wheel: The Positive Relationship Between Green Technology And Patient Enforcement, Addison S. Fowler

Villanova Environmental Law Journal

No abstract provided.


How Can You Tell If There Is A Crisis? Data And Measurement Challenges In Assessing Jury Representation, Mary R. Rose, Marc A. Musick 2024 Chicago-Kent College of Law

How Can You Tell If There Is A Crisis? Data And Measurement Challenges In Assessing Jury Representation, Mary R. Rose, Marc A. Musick

Chicago-Kent Law Review

No abstract provided.


Race, Peremptory Challenges, And State Courts: A Blueprint For Change, Nancy S. Marder 2024 Chicago-Kent College of Law

Race, Peremptory Challenges, And State Courts: A Blueprint For Change, Nancy S. Marder

Chicago-Kent Law Review

No abstract provided.


Judges, Lawyers, And Willing Jurors: A Tale Of Two Jury Selections, Barbara O'Brien, Catherine M. Grosso 2024 Chicago-Kent College of Law

Judges, Lawyers, And Willing Jurors: A Tale Of Two Jury Selections, Barbara O'Brien, Catherine M. Grosso

Chicago-Kent Law Review

No abstract provided.


Beacons Of Democracy? A Worldwide Exploration Of The Relationship Between Democracy And Lay Participation In Criminal Cases, Sanja K. Ivkovic, Valarie P. Hans 2024 Chicago-Kent College of Law

Beacons Of Democracy? A Worldwide Exploration Of The Relationship Between Democracy And Lay Participation In Criminal Cases, Sanja K. Ivkovic, Valarie P. Hans

Chicago-Kent Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Arrival Of The Civil Jury In Argentina: The Case Of Chaco, Shari S. Diamond, Valarie P. Hans, Natali Chizik, Andres Harfuch 2024 Chicago-Kent College of Law

The Arrival Of The Civil Jury In Argentina: The Case Of Chaco, Shari S. Diamond, Valarie P. Hans, Natali Chizik, Andres Harfuch

Chicago-Kent Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Hybridization Of Lay Courts: From Colombia To England And Wales, Jeremy Boulanger-Bonnelly 2024 Chicago-Kent College of Law

The Hybridization Of Lay Courts: From Colombia To England And Wales, Jeremy Boulanger-Bonnelly

Chicago-Kent Law Review

No abstract provided.


Lay Participation Reform In China: Opportunities And Challenges, Zhiyuan Guo 2024 Chicago-Kent College of Law

Lay Participation Reform In China: Opportunities And Challenges, Zhiyuan Guo

Chicago-Kent Law Review

No abstract provided.


Virtual Technology And The Changing Rituals Of Courtroom Justice, Meredith Rossner, David Tait 2024 Chicago-Kent College of Law

Virtual Technology And The Changing Rituals Of Courtroom Justice, Meredith Rossner, David Tait

Chicago-Kent Law Review

No abstract provided.


Virtual Technology And The Changing Rituals Of Courtroom Justice, Meredith Rossner, David Tait 2024 Chicago-Kent College of Law

Virtual Technology And The Changing Rituals Of Courtroom Justice, Meredith Rossner, David Tait

Chicago-Kent Law Review

No abstract provided.


How Can You Tell If There Is A Crisis? Data And Measurement Challenges In Assessing Jury Representation, Mary R. Rose, Marc A. Musick 2024 Chicago-Kent College of Law

How Can You Tell If There Is A Crisis? Data And Measurement Challenges In Assessing Jury Representation, Mary R. Rose, Marc A. Musick

Chicago-Kent Law Review

No abstract provided.


Beacons Of Democracy? A Worldwide Exploration Of The Relationship Between Democracy And Lay Participation In Criminal Cases, Sanja K. Ivkovic, Valarie P. Hans 2024 Chicago-Kent College of Law

Beacons Of Democracy? A Worldwide Exploration Of The Relationship Between Democracy And Lay Participation In Criminal Cases, Sanja K. Ivkovic, Valarie P. Hans

Chicago-Kent Law Review

No abstract provided.


An "F" In Judicial Education: Why Emerging Technologies And New Risks Demand Judicial Education Reform, Kevin Thomas Frazier J.D., M.P.A. 2024 Ohio Northern University

An "F" In Judicial Education: Why Emerging Technologies And New Risks Demand Judicial Education Reform, Kevin Thomas Frazier J.D., M.P.A.

Ohio Northern University Law Review

No abstract provided.


Not Even A Federal Judge Can Make Texas Protect Kids, Patrick Michels 2024 Texas Monthly

Not Even A Federal Judge Can Make Texas Protect Kids, Patrick Michels

UDC Law Faculty in the News

In a thirteenth-floor courtroom in downtown Dallas, Jackie Juarez took the witness stand to testify about years of mistreatment under the system that raised her. Now eighteen years old, she stood a little over four and a half feet tall, with dark curls that fell atop a long, cream-colored cardigan. She pulled By Patrick Michels the microphone close as she spoke. At eleven years old, she had been placed in the state’s custody, for reasons that remain confidential. She was removed from a group home after reporting inappropriate text messages from a male staffer—he remained employed at the facility, while …


Ukraine’S Supreme Court: Upholding Justice Amid War, Olena Kibenko, Cristobal Diaz 2024 Duke Law School

Ukraine’S Supreme Court: Upholding Justice Amid War, Olena Kibenko, Cristobal Diaz

Judicature International

No abstract provided.


The Unwritten Norms Of Civil Procedure, Diego A. Zambrano 2024 Northwestern Pritzker School of Law

The Unwritten Norms Of Civil Procedure, Diego A. Zambrano

Northwestern University Law Review

The rules of civil procedure depend on norms and conventions that control their application. Civil procedure is a famously rule-based field centered on textual commands in the form of the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure (FRCP). There are over eighty rules, hundreds of local judge-made rules, due process doctrines, and statutory rules, too. But written rules are overrated. Deep down, proceduralists know that the application of written rules hinges on broader norms that animate them, expand or constrain them, and even empower judges to ignore them. Unlike the FRCP and related doctrines, these procedural norms are unwritten, sociological, flexible, and …


Hung Out To Try: A Rule 29 Revision To Stop Hung Jury Retrials, Elijah N. Gelman 2024 Northwestern Pritzker School of Law

Hung Out To Try: A Rule 29 Revision To Stop Hung Jury Retrials, Elijah N. Gelman

Northwestern University Law Review

How many times can a defendant be retried? For those facing hung jury retrials, it’s as many times as the government pleases. Double jeopardy prohibitions do not apply when juries fail to reach a verdict.

There is, theoretically, a built-in procedural solution to stop the government from endlessly retrying defendants. Rule 29 of the Federal Rules of Criminal Procedure allows judges to acquit defendants when “the evidence is insufficient to sustain a conviction.” Considering that a hung jury indicates the jurors could not agree on the sufficiency of the evidence, defendants facing hung jury retrials are prime candidates for this …


Judicial Fidelity, Caprice L. Roberts 2024 Pepperdine University

Judicial Fidelity, Caprice L. Roberts

Pepperdine Law Review

Judicial critics abound. Some say the rule of law is dead across all three branches of government. Four are dead if you count the media as the fourth estate. All are in trouble, even if one approves of each branch’s headlines, but none of them are dead. Not yet. Pundits and scholars see the latest term of the Supreme Court as clear evidence of partisan politics and unbridled power. They decry an upheaval of laws and norms demonstrating the dire situation across the federal judiciary. Democracy is not dead even when the Court issues opinions that overturn precedent, upends long-standing …


Abortion And Affirmative Action: The Fragility Of Supreme Court Political Decision-Making, William E. Nelson 2024 New York University School of Law

Abortion And Affirmative Action: The Fragility Of Supreme Court Political Decision-Making, William E. Nelson

Indiana Journal of Law and Social Equality

This Article shows, on the basis of new evidence, that the canonical case of Marbury v. Madison has been grossly misinterpreted and that as a result of the misinterpretation we cannot understand what is wrong with contemporary cases such as Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization and Students for Fair Admissions, Inc. v. President and Fellows of Harvard College.

The Article will proceed as follows. Because Marbury cannot be properly understood without understanding the eighteenth-century background against which it was decided, Part I will examine legal practices in colonial and post-Revolutionary America, focusing on cases in which judicial review emerged …


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