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Arguing With Friends, William Baude, Ryan D. Doerfler 2017 University of Chicago

Arguing With Friends, William Baude, Ryan D. Doerfler

Faculty Scholarship

It is a fact of life that judges sometimes disagree about the best outcome in appealed cases. The question is what they should make of this. The two purest possibilities are to shut out all other views, or else to let them all in, leading one to concede ambiguity and uncertainty in most if not all contested cases.

Drawing on the philosophical concepts of “peer disagreement” and “epistemic peerhood,” we argue that there is a better way. Judges ought to give significant weight to the views of others, but only when those others share the judge’s basic methodology or ...


It Can't Wait: Exposing The Connections Between Forms Of Sexual Exploitation, Dawn Hawkins 2017 National Center on Sexual Exploitation

It Can't Wait: Exposing The Connections Between Forms Of Sexual Exploitation, Dawn Hawkins

Dignity: A Journal on Sexual Exploitation and Violence

No abstract provided.


Today's Porn: Not A Constitutional Right; Not A Human Right, Patrick Trueman 2017 National Center on Sexual Exploitation

Today's Porn: Not A Constitutional Right; Not A Human Right, Patrick Trueman

Dignity: A Journal on Sexual Exploitation and Violence

No abstract provided.


For Legal Principles, Mitchell N. Berman 2017 University of Pennsylvania Law School

For Legal Principles, Mitchell N. Berman

Faculty Scholarship

Most legal thinkers believe that legal rules and legal principles are meaningfully distinguished. Many jurists may have no very precise distinction in mind, and those who do might not all agree. But it is widely believed that legal norms come in different logical types, and that one difference is reasonably well captured by a nomenclature that distinguishes “rules” from “principles.” Larry Alexander is the foremost challenger to this bit of legal-theoretic orthodoxy. In several articles, but especially in “Against Legal Principles,” an influential article co-authored with Ken Kress two decades ago, Alexander has argued that legal principles cannot exist.

In ...


Do Muddy Waters Shift Burdens?, Carrie Sperling, Kimberly Holst 2017 University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law

Do Muddy Waters Shift Burdens?, Carrie Sperling, Kimberly Holst

Maryland Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Problems With Moral Subjectivism, Seow Hon TAN 2017 Singapore Management University

The Problems With Moral Subjectivism, Seow Hon Tan

Research Collection School Of Law

Moral dialogue for moral subjectivists is gravely limited. As soon as moral subjectivists hold another person to any moral standard independent of the person’s belief, they must give up their moral subjectivism. Some moral subjectivists might turn out to be moral realists who accord primacy to autonomy. This, however, is a senseless position that renders all persons equally worthless, unless such moral realists concede that norms that limit autonomy exist. But if so, they are not different from any other moral realists after all.


Revolutionary Disobedience, Philip K. Y. Lau 2017 Barry University School of Law

Revolutionary Disobedience, Philip K. Y. Lau

Barry Law Review

Over the past few decades, civil disobedience has become one of the most widely studied subjects in jurisprudence. Scholars such as Rawls and Dworkin have offered their unique reflections on the subject. Whilst many have made great contributions to clarify its purposes and justifications, they have neglected one of the most important and fundamental forms of political disobedience, namely revolutionary disobedience. Unlike an act of civil disobedience, which recognizes governmental authority and legitimacy, revolutionary disobedience explicitly denies and challenges them. Manifested as a rupture between the constituent power (ruled/governed) and constituted power (ruler/governor) in a given state, it ...


I Share, Therefore It's Mine, Donald J. Kochan 2017 Chapman University School of Law

I Share, Therefore It's Mine, Donald J. Kochan

Donald J. Kochan

Uniquely interconnecting lessons from law, psychology, and economics, this article aims to provide a more enriched understanding of what it means to “share” property in the sharing economy. It explains that there is an “ownership prerequisite” to the sharing of property, drawing in part from the findings of research in the psychology of child development to show when and why children start to share. They do so only after developing what psychologists call “ownership understanding.” What the psychological research reveals, then, is that the property system is well suited to create recognizable and enforceable ownership norms that include the rights ...


The Other Preamble: Civic Constitutionalism And The Preamble To The Bill Of Rights, John E. Finn 2017 wesleyan university

The Other Preamble: Civic Constitutionalism And The Preamble To The Bill Of Rights, John E. Finn

Concordia Law Review

This Article considers the civic constitutionalist nature of the Preamble to the Bill of Rights. Civic constitutionalism is a mode of reading constitutional texts that considers power in political, as opposed to legal, terms. Thus, the civic constitution gives citizens, not judges, the primary duty for ensuring a constitutionally compliant society. This Article also presents the underlying reasons, effects, and costs of the obscurity of the civic constitution and, more specifically, the Preamble to the Bill of Rights.


Private Rights And Private Wrongs, Andrew S. Gold 2017 DePaul University College of Law

Private Rights And Private Wrongs, Andrew S. Gold

Michigan Law Review

Review of Private Wrongs by Arthur Ripstein.


Law As Trope: Framing And Evaluating Conceptual Metaphors, Harold Anthony Lloyd 2017 Wake Forest University School of Law

Law As Trope: Framing And Evaluating Conceptual Metaphors, Harold Anthony Lloyd

Pace Law Review

Like others who work with language, many lawyers no doubt appreciate good kennings. However, metaphors also play a much deeper role in thought and law than style, ornament, or verbal virtuosity. As we shall see, metaphors play a necessary role in our categories of thought. As a result, metaphors are a necessary part of thought itself, including legal thought.


Fiduciary-Isms: A Study Of Academic Influence On The Expansion Of The Law, Daniel B. Yeager 2017 California Western School of Law

Fiduciary-Isms: A Study Of Academic Influence On The Expansion Of The Law, Daniel B. Yeager

Daniel B. Yeager

Fiduciary law aspires to nullify power imbalances by obligating strong parties to give themselves over to servient parties. For example, due to profound imbalances of legal know-how, lawyers must as fiduciaries pursue their clients’ interests, not their own, lest clients get lost in the competitive shuffle. As a peculiar hybrid of status and contract relations, politics and law, compassion and capitalism, fiduciary law is very much in vogue in academic circles. As vogue as it is, there remains room for my “Fiduciary-isms...”, a meditation on the expansion of fiduciary law from its origins in the law of trusts through partnerships ...


Marlowe's Faustus: Contract As Metaphor?, Daniel B. Yeager 2017 California Western School of Law

Marlowe's Faustus: Contract As Metaphor?, Daniel B. Yeager

Daniel B. Yeager

No abstract provided.


Our Principled Constitution, Mitchell N. Berman 2017 University of Pennsylvania Law School

Our Principled Constitution, Mitchell N. Berman

Faculty Scholarship

Suppose that one of us contends, and the other denies, that transgender persons have constitutional rights to be treated in accord with their gender identity. It appears that we are disagreeing about “what the law is.” And, most probably, we disagree about what the law is on this matter because we disagree about what generally makes it the case that our constitutional law is this rather than that.

Constitutional theory should provide guidance. It should endeavor to explain what gives our constitutional rules the contents that they have, or what makes true constitutional propositions true. Call any such account a ...


Does Hard Incompatibilism Really Abolish ‘Right’ And ‘Wrong’? Some Thoughts In Response To Larry Alexander, John A. Humbach Mr. 2017 Pace University School of Law

Does Hard Incompatibilism Really Abolish ‘Right’ And ‘Wrong’? Some Thoughts In Response To Larry Alexander, John A. Humbach Mr.

Pace Law Faculty Publications

In a challenge to recent writings of Derk Pereboom and Gregg Caruso,3 Larry Alexander makes the following claim: If one accepts the Pereboom-Caruso “hard incompatibilist” view of choice, which regards blame and retributive punishment as morally unjustified because free will is an illusion, then “normativity completely disappears.” In making this claim, Professor Alexander appears to hold that the moral distinction between right and wrong conduct (“normativity”) cannot effectively exist unless those who do wrong “deserve” to receive blame and punishment in response to their misbehavior. This is not, however, necessarily so.


Bail Reform: New Directions For Pretrial Detention And Release, Megan Stevenson, Sandra G. Mayson 2017 University of Pennsylvania

Bail Reform: New Directions For Pretrial Detention And Release, Megan Stevenson, Sandra G. Mayson

Faculty Scholarship

Our current pretrial system imposes high costs on both the people who are detained pretrial and the taxpayers who foot the bill. These costs have prompted a surge of bail reform around the country. Reformers seek to reduce pretrial detention rates, as well as racial and socioeconomic disparities in the pretrial system, while simultaneously improving appearance rates and reducing pretrial crime. The current state of pretrial practice suggests that there is ample room for improvement. Bail hearings are often cursory, with no defense counsel present. Money-bail practices lead to high rates of detention even among misdemeanor defendants and those who ...


High-Stakes Interpretation, Ryan D. Doerfler 2017 University of Pennsylvania Law School

High-Stakes Interpretation, Ryan D. Doerfler

Faculty Scholarship

Courts look at text differently in high-stakes cases. Statutory language that would otherwise be ‘unambiguous’ suddenly becomes ‘less than clear.’ This, in turn, frees up courts to sidestep constitutional conflicts, avoid dramatic policy changes, and, more generally, get around undesirable outcomes. The standard account of this behavior is that courts’ failure to recognize ‘clear’ or ‘unambiguous’ meanings in such cases is motivated or disingenuous, and, at best, justified on instrumentalist grounds.

This Article challenges that account. It argues instead that, as a purely epistemic matter, it is more difficult to ‘know’ what a text means—and, hence, more difficult to ...


Spatial Terrorism, Dawinder S. Sidhu 2017 University of New Mexico School of Law

Spatial Terrorism, Dawinder S. Sidhu

Dawinder Sidhu

Terrorism, under federal law, generally means an act of politically- or socially-motivated violence perpetrated against innocents. Terrorism within the meaning of federal law, in other words, exists only if a cognizable motive is uncovered. This definition also sees the United States as an undifferentiated landscape—by its own terms, it fails to take into account any geographic nuance in acts of mass violence. This Article suggests that spatial considerations are relevant in determining whether an act of mass violence constitutes an act of terrorism for purposes of federal law. It points to cities—which are characterized by a highly concentrated ...


Emigres: Lost In A Sea Of Ignorance, Ronald C. Griffin 2017 Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University

Emigres: Lost In A Sea Of Ignorance, Ronald C. Griffin

Faculty Books and Book Contributions

In EMIGRES: Lost in a Sea of Ignorance, Prof. Griffin states that austerity grips western nations, where governments spend paltry sums on welfare, refugees, and migrants. In his essay, Griffin parses a trove of knowledge about welfare and what's being done for needy people. There is a recounting of an Irish case, a report on spectacles in the US, and a narrative about the troubles in Europe stirred-up by Syrian refugees.


Abductive Reasoning In Wto Law, Chios Carmody 2017 University of Western Ontario

Abductive Reasoning In Wto Law, Chios Carmody

Law Publications

Law is about many things, but at base it is about rights and obligations. That jural correlation is established and sustained by means of reasoning. We hold that an actor has a right or obligation by virtue of reasoning that classically occurs in one of two forms. An obligation creates a right by means of inductive logic that rests on the conviction of similar instances in the past and the need for proof. It can also create an obligation by means of deductive logic, that is, the process of reasoning from one or more statements (premises) that are used to ...


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