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Modos De Extinción De La Propiedad, Ronald Benjamin Jallurana Añamuro 2015 UNAP

Modos De Extinción De La Propiedad, Ronald Benjamin Jallurana Añamuro

RONALD BENJAMIN Jallurana Añamuro

De acuerdo al C. C. (art. 968) la propiedad se extingue por: 1. Adquisición del bien por otra persona. 2. Destrucción o pérdida total o consumo del bien. 3. Expropiación. 4. Abandono del bien durante veinte años, en cuyo caso pasa el predio al dominio del estado.


Stop Blaming The Prosecutors: The Real Causes Of Wrongful Convictions And Rightful Exonerations, And What Should Be Done To Fix Them, Adam Lamparello, Charles E. MacLean, James J. Berles 2015 Indiana Tech Law School

Stop Blaming The Prosecutors: The Real Causes Of Wrongful Convictions And Rightful Exonerations, And What Should Be Done To Fix Them, Adam Lamparello, Charles E. Maclean, James J. Berles

Adam Lamparello

Wrongfully convicted and rightfully exonerated criminal defendants spent, on average, ten years in prison before exoneration, and the ramifications to the defendants, the criminal justice system, and society are immeasurable.Prosecutorial misconduct, however, is not the primary cause of wrongful convictions. To begin with, although more than twenty million new adult criminal cases are opened in state and federal courts each year throughout the United States, there have been only 1,281 total exonerations over the last twenty-five years. In only six percent of those cases was prosecutorial misconduct the predominant factor resulting in those wrongful convictions. Of course, although ...


R V Fearon Case Commentary, Western Journal of Legal Studies Editorial Board 2015 Western University

R V Fearon Case Commentary, Western Journal Of Legal Studies Editorial Board

Western Journal of Legal Studies

The widespread use of smart phones and similar devices for data management has created significant constitutional and criminal law issues. This is evident in the context of protection by the Charter with respect to unreasonable search and seizure. When an individual’s section 8 rights are breached, an assessment of the admissibility of evidence under section 24(2) of the Charter is required. In R v Fearon, the Supreme Court of Canada established new limits on the police power to search cell phones and similar devices incident to arrest. Cromwell J stated that these measures do not “represent the only ...


Newsroom: A Closer Look At Mass Incarceration, Roger Williams University School of Law 2015 Roger Williams University

Newsroom: A Closer Look At Mass Incarceration, Roger Williams University School Of Law

Life of the Law School (1993- )

No abstract provided.


Mexico’S Catch-22: How The Necessary Extradition Of Drug Cartel Leaders Undermines Long-Term Criminal Justice Reforms, Walter Rodriguez 2015 Boston College Law School

Mexico’S Catch-22: How The Necessary Extradition Of Drug Cartel Leaders Undermines Long-Term Criminal Justice Reforms, Walter Rodriguez

Boston College International and Comparative Law Review

Grisly cartel violence has plagued Mexico in recent decades, effectively destabilizing its government and encasing its citizenry in trepidation and fear. A joint operation between Mexican Marines and the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration in February 2014, however, finally penetrated the myth of invulnerability for drug trafficking organizations with the arrest of that world’s most powerful leader, Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzmán. Although this development is evidence of Mexican law enforcement’s newfound ability to track and capture the most dominant of drug bosses, Mexico’s criminal justice system continues to lack the requisite structure, political will, and expertise to ...


Free, But Still Behind Bars: Reading The Illinois Post-Conviction Hearing Act To Allow Any Person Convicted Of A Crime To Raise A Claim Of Actual Innocence, Hugh M. Mundy 2015 The John Marshall Law School

Free, But Still Behind Bars: Reading The Illinois Post-Conviction Hearing Act To Allow Any Person Convicted Of A Crime To Raise A Claim Of Actual Innocence, Hugh M. Mundy

Boston College Journal of Law & Social Justice

As the number of wrongfully convicted prisoners who are subsequently exonerated continues to rise, the importance of access to post-conviction relief also increases. Under the Illinois Post-Conviction Hearing Act, this access is restricted to petitioners who are currently imprisoned or otherwise facing a restraint on their liberty. Persons convicted of a crime who have completed their sentence are barred from pursuing post-conviction relief under the Act, regardless of the existence of exculpatory evidence that supports their innocence. Removing this procedural roadblock and interpreting the Act broadly to allow any person convicted of a crime to raise a claim of actual ...


“This Experiment, So Fatal”: Some Initial Thoughts On Strategic Choices In The Campaign Against Solitary Confinement, Elizabeth Alexander 2015 UC Irvine School of Law

“This Experiment, So Fatal”: Some Initial Thoughts On Strategic Choices In The Campaign Against Solitary Confinement, Elizabeth Alexander

UC Irvine Law Review

No abstract provided.


Supermax Administration And The Eighth Amendment: Deference, Discretion, And Double Bunking, 1986–2010, Keramet Reiter 2015 UC Irvine

Supermax Administration And The Eighth Amendment: Deference, Discretion, And Double Bunking, 1986–2010, Keramet Reiter

UC Irvine Law Review

No abstract provided.


Trends In Prisoner Litigation, As The Plra Enters Adulthood, Margo Schlanger 2015 University of Michigan Law School

Trends In Prisoner Litigation, As The Plra Enters Adulthood, Margo Schlanger

UC Irvine Law Review

No abstract provided.


Banning The Bing: Why Extreme Solitary Confinement Is Cruel And Far Too Usual Punishment, Elizabeth Bennion 2015 BYU Law School

Banning The Bing: Why Extreme Solitary Confinement Is Cruel And Far Too Usual Punishment, Elizabeth Bennion

Indiana Law Journal

The United States engages in extreme practices of solitary confinement that maximize isolation and sensory deprivation of prisoners. The length is often indefinite and can stretch for weeks, months, years, or decades. Under these conditions, both healthy prisoners and those with preexisting mental-health issues often severely deteriorate both mentally and physically. New science and data provide increased insight into why and how human beings (and other social animals) deteriorate and suffer in such environments. The science establishes that meaningful social contacts and some level of opportunity for sensory enrichment are minimum human necessities. When those necessities are denied, the high ...


Jury Sentencing And Juveniles: Eighth Amendment Limits And Sixth Amendment Rights, Sarah French Russell 2015 Quinnipiac University School of Law

Jury Sentencing And Juveniles: Eighth Amendment Limits And Sixth Amendment Rights, Sarah French Russell

Boston College Law Review

Across the country, states are grappling with how to comply with the U.S. Supreme Court’s recent decision in Miller v. Alabama, which held that mandatory life-without-parole sentences for juveniles violate the Eighth Amendment. Following Miller, it appears a sentencer may impose life without parole on a juvenile homicide offender only in those rare instances in which the sentencer determines, after considering the mitigating qualities of youth, that the juvenile’s crime reflects “irreparable corruption.” Courts are preparing to conduct resentencing hearings in states nationwide, and new cases where juveniles face the possibility of life in prison are entering ...


Moneyball Sentencing, Dawinder Sidhu 2015 University of New Mexico School of Law

Moneyball Sentencing, Dawinder Sidhu

Boston College Law Review

Sentencing is a backward- and forward-looking enterprise. That is, sentencing is informed by an individual’s past conduct as well as by the criminal justice system’s prediction of the individual’s future criminal conduct. Increasingly, the criminal justice system is making these predictions on an actuarial basis, computing the individual’s risk of recidivism according to the rates of recidivism for people possessing the same group characteristics (e.g., race, sex, socio-economic status, education). The sentencing community is drawn to this statistical technique because it purportedly distinguishes with greater accuracy the high-risk from the low-risk, and thereby allows for ...


The Privacies Of Life: Automatic License Plate Recognition Is Unconstitutional Under The Mosaic Theory Of Fourth Amendment Privacy Law, Jessica Gutierrez-Alm 2015 Winthrop & Weinstine, Associate Attorney

The Privacies Of Life: Automatic License Plate Recognition Is Unconstitutional Under The Mosaic Theory Of Fourth Amendment Privacy Law, Jessica Gutierrez-Alm

Hamline Law Review

Abstract


Symposium: Sounding The Alarm On Mass Incarceration: Moving Beyond The Problem And Toward Solutions, Roger Williams University School of Law 2015 Roger Williams University

Symposium: Sounding The Alarm On Mass Incarceration: Moving Beyond The Problem And Toward Solutions, Roger Williams University School Of Law

Life of the Law School (1993- )

No abstract provided.


Discouraging Police Use Of Choke-Holds In California, Catherine L. Rucker 2015 Golden Gate University School of Law

Discouraging Police Use Of Choke-Holds In California, Catherine L. Rucker

Catherine L Rucker

This resolution would discourage police use of choke-holds by eliminating the training and testing modules for choke holds from the California Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST) curriculum.

Video of the fatal choke-hold: http://www.theguardian.com/us-news/video/2014/dec/04/i-cant-breathe-eric-garner-chokehold-death-video. See 1:20 min to 1:40 min.


Identifying Criminals’ Risk Preferences, Murat C. Mungan, Jonathan Klick 2015 Florida State University

Identifying Criminals’ Risk Preferences, Murat C. Mungan, Jonathan Klick

Faculty Scholarship

There is a 250 year old presumption in the criminology and law enforcement literature that people are deterred more by increases in the certainty rather than increases in the severity of legal sanctions. We call this presumption the Certainty Aversion Presumption (CAP). Simple criminal decision making models suggest that criminals must be risk-seeking if they behave consistently with CAP. This implication leads to disturbing interpretations, such as criminals being categorically different than law abiding people, who often display risk-averse behavior while making financial decisions. Moreover, policy discussions that incorrectly rely on criminals’ risk attitudes implied by CAP are ill-informed, and ...


Extradition Treaty Improvements To Combat Drug Trafficking, J. Richard Barnett 2015 University of Georgia School of Law

Extradition Treaty Improvements To Combat Drug Trafficking, J. Richard Barnett

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


Civil Asset Forfeiture: An Economic Analysis Of Ontario And British Columbia, Patrick Daley 2015 Western University

Civil Asset Forfeiture: An Economic Analysis Of Ontario And British Columbia, Patrick Daley

Western Journal of Legal Studies

This paper compares and analyzes the incentive structure of Ontario and British Columbia’s civil asset forfeiture regimes. Part one surveys the American civil forfeiture experience to draw out theoretical considerations from American academia and inform a discussion of Canadian law. Part two compares the Ontario and British Columbia civil forfeiture regimes and identifies institutional incentives and barriers embedded in the framework of the forfeiture regimes in each province. Part three uses empirical data to explain how Ontario and British Columbia’s incentive structures affect civil forfeiture’s use. The paper argues there is an optimal allocation of resources towards ...


Permissibility Of Colour And Racial Profiling, James Singh Gill 2015 Thompson Rivers University

Permissibility Of Colour And Racial Profiling, James Singh Gill

Western Journal of Legal Studies

Racial profiling in law enforcement is a contentious matter, particularly in light of U.S. police-citizen race tensions. The racial profiling debate has not been settled. Racial profiling proponents view it as a tool to effectively uncover criminal activity among certain racial groups. Critics find that racial profiling perpetuates racial stigmas and is largely inefficient as a policing tool. This article explores the ongoing debate and offers an overview of the Canadian judicial experience with racial profiling. The author proposes a middle-ground solution where racial profiling may be used under certain constraints imposed on law enforcement. The author suggests that ...


Jones, Lackey, And Teague, Richard Broughton 2015 University of Detroit Mercy School of Law

Jones, Lackey, And Teague, Richard Broughton

Richard Broughton

In a recent, high-profile ruling, a federal court finally recognized that a substantial delay in executing a death row inmate violated the Eighth Amendment’s ban on cruel and unusual punishments. Courts have repeatedly rejected these so-called “Lackey claims,” making the federal court’s decision in Jones v. Chappell all the more important. And yet it was deeply flawed. This paper focuses on one of the major flaws in the Jones decision that largely escaped attention: the application of the non-retroactivity rule from Teague v. Lane. By comprehensively addressing the merits of the Teague bar as applied to Lackey claims ...


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