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Conscience And Complicity: Assessing Pleas For Religious Exemptions In Hobby Lobby's Wake, Amy Sepinwall 2015 Legal Studies & Business Ethics/Wharton University of Pennsylvania

Conscience And Complicity: Assessing Pleas For Religious Exemptions In Hobby Lobby's Wake, Amy Sepinwall

Amy J. Sepinwall

In the paradigmatic case of conscientious objection, the objector claims that his religion forbids him from actively participating in a wrong (e.g., by fighting in a war). In the religious challenges to the Affordable Care Act’s employer mandate, on the other hand, employers claim that their religious convictions forbid them from merely subsidizing insurance through which their employees might commit a wrong (e.g., by using contraception). The understanding of complicity underpinning these challenges is vastly more expansive than what standard legal doctrine or moral theory contemplates. Courts routinely reject claims of conscientious objection to taxes that fund ...


Does Shari’A Play A Role In Turkey?, Russell Powell 2015 Pepperdine University

Does Shari’A Play A Role In Turkey?, Russell Powell

Pepperdine Law Review

An essay is presented in which the author explores the relationship of religious law with contemporary Turkey. Topics discussed include certain civil law supporting adoption of Sharia in Turkey, role of religious people in providing protection to religious freedom in Turkey, and role of traditional Kemalist secularism laiklik in distinguishing Turkey.


“A Jewish And Democratic State:” Reflections On The Fragility Of Israeli Secularism, Zvi Triger 2015 Pepperdine University

“A Jewish And Democratic State:” Reflections On The Fragility Of Israeli Secularism, Zvi Triger

Pepperdine Law Review

An essay is presented in which the author explores fragility of Israeli secularism related to Jewish religion. Topics discussed are the impact of religious monopoly over personal status in Israel on Israeli secularism, the origination of religious monopoly over personal status during the Ottoman Empire's rule over Palestine, and dispute resolution of domestic cases in communities' and tribes' religious tribunals under their religious laws.


“Islamic Law” In Us Courts: Judicial Jihad Or Constitutional Imperative?, Faisal Kutty 2015 Pepperdine University

“Islamic Law” In Us Courts: Judicial Jihad Or Constitutional Imperative?, Faisal Kutty

Pepperdine Law Review

At the beginning of 2014, about a dozen states introduced or re-introduced bills to ban the use of Sharī’ah law. They hope to join the seven states that have ostensibly banned it to date. Anti-Sharī’ah advocates have cited a number of cases to back their tenuous claim that Sharī’ah is stealthily sneaking in through the doctrine of comity, but a close examination of the cases they cite contradicts their claim. Comity, when one court defers to the jurisdiction of another, has been accepted and denied based on legal principles and public policy, on a case-by-case basis. There ...


Conceptions Of Religion In The Secular State: Evolving Turkish Secularism, Seval Yildirim 2015 Pepperdine University

Conceptions Of Religion In The Secular State: Evolving Turkish Secularism, Seval Yildirim

Pepperdine Law Review

The article focuses on the concepts of religion in secular states such as Republic of Turkey. Topics discussed include distinction between secularism and religion, views of philosopher of liberalism John Locke on delegation of matters of faith to the Church and matters of public good to the state along with the relationship of modernization and secularism.


Foreign And Religious Family Law: Comity, Contract, And The Constitution, Ann Laquer Estin 2015 Pepperdine University

Foreign And Religious Family Law: Comity, Contract, And The Constitution, Ann Laquer Estin

Pepperdine Law Review

The article focuses on role of the U.S. courts in confronting religious laws in dispute resolution of various cases of domestic relations, contracts, and torts. Topics discussed include role of secular courts in maintaining constitutional balance between the free exercise and establishment clauses, constitutional challenges faced by religious adherents, and importance of legal pluralism in the U.S.


Rethinking The “Religious-Question” Doctrine, Christopher C. Lund 2015 Pepperdine University

Rethinking The “Religious-Question” Doctrine, Christopher C. Lund

Pepperdine Law Review

The “religious question” doctrine is a well-known and commonly accepted notion about the First Amendment’s Religion Clauses. The general idea is that, in our system of separated church and state, courts do not decide religious questions. And from this premise, many things flow — including the idea that courts must dismiss otherwise justiciable controversies when they would require courts to resolve religious questions. Yet a vexing thought arises. The religious-question doctrine traditionally comes out of a notion that secular courts cannot resolve metaphysical or theological issues. But when one looks at the cases that courts have been dismissing pursuant to ...


Religious Tribunals And Secular Courts: Navigating Power And Powerlessness, Michelle Greenberg-Kobrin 2015 Pepperdine University

Religious Tribunals And Secular Courts: Navigating Power And Powerlessness, Michelle Greenberg-Kobrin

Pepperdine Law Review

In this article, the author discusses the ways such as common law, and contracts employed by religious systems for navigating their relationship with legal systems of secular states. Topics discussed include the role of religious contracts in helping religious systems negotiate with secularism, the role of religious contracts in protecting autonomy of religious systems, and the structure of marriage and divorce in Jewish law.


Introduction: Religious Law In The 21st Century, Michael A. Helfand 2015 Pepperdine University

Introduction: Religious Law In The 21st Century, Michael A. Helfand

Pepperdine Law Review

An introduction is presented in which the editor discusses various articles present in symposium including role of the U.S. courts in interpreting religious laws, practice of religious laws in secular states, and political, and legal structures of Jewish and Islamic identities.


Response: Situating Ourselves In History, Steven D. Smith 2015 Pepperdine University

Response: Situating Ourselves In History, Steven D. Smith

Pepperdine Law Review

The author presents his views on history of religious freedom incorporated in his Brandeis lecture and in the book "The Rise and Decline of American Religious Freedom." Topics discussed include hegemonic status of special protection to religious freedom for legal academics, role of ending religious freedom in providing protection to religious actors under other constitutional provisions like free speech, and impact of ending religious freedom on other freedom like freedom of association.


The End Of Religious Freedom: What Is At Stake?, Nelson Tebbe 2015 Pepperdine University

The End Of Religious Freedom: What Is At Stake?, Nelson Tebbe

Pepperdine Law Review

In recent work, Steven Smith argues that the American tradition of religious freedom is newly imperiled and may even be nearing exhaustion. This Review puts to one side the substance of that argument and focuses instead on what the stakes might be, should it turn out to be correct. It concludes that the consequences would not be as severe as many people fear.


Theorists, Get Over Yourselves: A Response To Steven D. Smith, Andrew Koppelman 2015 Pepperdine University

Theorists, Get Over Yourselves: A Response To Steven D. Smith, Andrew Koppelman

Pepperdine Law Review

In this article, the author presents his views in response to the article The Last Chapter? by critic of contemporary liberal theory Steven D. Smith in reference to his book "Defending American Religious Neutrality." Topics discussed include the political aspects associated with religious freedom, role of secularism in eroding religious freedom, and conflicts between religion and modern secular egalitarianism.


More “Vitiating Paradoxes”: A Response To Steven D. Smith, Paul Horwitz 2015 Pepperdine University

More “Vitiating Paradoxes”: A Response To Steven D. Smith, Paul Horwitz

Pepperdine Law Review

In this article, the author presents his views in response to the article The Last Chapter? by critic Steven D. Smith. Topics discussed include importance of critical legal studies (CLS) theory in reflecting political aspects of religious freedom, views of Smith in his book "The Rise and Decline of American Religious Freedom," and the relationship of egalitarianism with religious freedom.


The Last Chapter?, Steven D. Smith 2015 Pepperdine University

The Last Chapter?, Steven D. Smith

Pepperdine Law Review

An essay is presented in which the author presents contrasting views of law professors at Stanford and Harvard University, Michael McConnell and Noah Feldman respectively on religious freedom. Topics discussed include requirement of special protection to religious freedom, protection of religious belief and expression under other constitutional provisions such as freedom of speech, and the failure of Obama Administration in providing special freedom of association to religious associations.


The Catholic Law School & Constitutional Self-Government, The Honorable Diarmuid F. O'Scannlain 2015 The Catholic University of America, Columbus School of Law

The Catholic Law School & Constitutional Self-Government, The Honorable Diarmuid F. O'Scannlain

Catholic University Law Review

Diarmuid F. O’Scannlain serves as a Circuit Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit. This talk was delivered at the Columbus School of Law, The Catholic University of America on September 15, 2014 for the 2014 Brendan F. Brown Lecture and has been adapted and updated for this article format.


A Primer On Hobby Lobby: For-Profit Corporate Entities’ Challenge To The Hhs Mandate, Free Exercise Rights, Rfra’S Scope, And The Nondelegation Doctrine, Terri R. Day, Leticia M. Diaz, Danielle Weatherby 2015 Pepperdine University

A Primer On Hobby Lobby: For-Profit Corporate Entities’ Challenge To The Hhs Mandate, Free Exercise Rights, Rfra’S Scope, And The Nondelegation Doctrine, Terri R. Day, Leticia M. Diaz, Danielle Weatherby

Pepperdine Law Review

Earlier this term, the United States Supreme Court heard oral argument in the consolidated case of Hobby Lobby Stores, Inc. v. Sebelius, the first of a litany of cases in which for-profit business entities are invoking the Religious Freedom Restoration Act ("RFRA") in support of their claim that the Affordable Care Act’s HHS Mandate violates their freedom of religion. In particular, these plaintiffs argue that the Mandate’s requirement that employer-provided health insurance covers the costs of contraceptives, the "morning after" pill, and other fertility-related drugs conflicts with their deeply-held religious belief that life begins at conception and is ...


Definitions, Religion, And Free Exercise Guarantees, Mark Strasser 2015 Capital University Law School

Definitions, Religion, And Free Exercise Guarantees, Mark Strasser

Mark Strasser

The First Amendment to the United States Constitution protects the free exercise of religion. Non-religious practices do not receive those same protections, which makes the ability to distinguish between religious and non-religious practices important. Regrettably, members of the Court have been unable to agree about how to distinguish the religious from the non-religious—sometimes, the implicit criteria focus on the sincerity of the beliefs, sometimes the strength of the beliefs or the role that they play in an individual’s life, and sometimes the kind of beliefs. In short, the Court has virtually guaranteed an incoherent jurisprudence by sending contradictory ...


Free Exercise And The Definition Of Religion: Confusion In The Federal Courts, Mark Strasser 2015 Capital University Law School

Free Exercise And The Definition Of Religion: Confusion In The Federal Courts, Mark Strasser

Mark Strasser

The United States Supreme Court has sent mixed messages about what constitutes religion for free exercise purposes. The Court’s failure to offer clear criteria has resulted in widely differing interpretations in the lower courts, resulting in dissimilar treatment of relevantly similar cases. Further, some of the circuit courts employ factors to determine what qualifies as religious that are much more restrictive than the factors employed by the Court.

This article describes some of the differing approaches to defining religion offered in the circuits, noting that one of the approaches adopted across a few circuits not only mischaracterizes the Supreme ...


Continuing The Constitutional Dialogue: A Discussion On Justice Stevens's Establishment Clause And Free Exercise Jurisprudence, Alan Brownstein 2015 Northwestern University School of Law

Continuing The Constitutional Dialogue: A Discussion On Justice Stevens's Establishment Clause And Free Exercise Jurisprudence, Alan Brownstein

Northwestern University Law Review

No abstract provided.


A Fixture On A Changing Court: Justice Stevens And The Establishment Clause, Erwin Chemerinsky 2015 Northwestern University School of Law

A Fixture On A Changing Court: Justice Stevens And The Establishment Clause, Erwin Chemerinsky

Northwestern University Law Review

No abstract provided.


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