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The New Progressive Property And The Low-Income Housing Conflict, Zachary A. Bray 2016 University of Kentucky

The New Progressive Property And The Low-Income Housing Conflict, Zachary A. Bray

Zachary Bray

The foundation of property law has been much debated in recent years, as several scholars have sought to provide a theoretical alternative to what they call the dominant, “law-and-economics” approach to property. In place of the law-and-economics approach, these scholars advance a new theoretical approach, which I call “the new progressive property.” At its core, this new approach favors rules thought to promote the collective well-being of the larger community while ensuring that relatively disadvantaged members of society have access to certain basic resources. This Article explores the boundaries and practical implications of the new progressive property. To do so ...


Perspectives On Abandoned Houses In A Time Of Dystopia, Kermit J. Lind 2016 Cleveland State University

Perspectives On Abandoned Houses In A Time Of Dystopia, Kermit J. Lind

Kermit J. Lind

This article describes various perspectives on abandoned houses in urban neighborhoods and the reactions from those perspectives. It notes how conflicting reactions perpetuate the crisis of blight for individual residents and their communities. It argues that real solutions for management of abandonment must be based in local communities and tailored to local conditions. Priority must be placed on consistent maintenance in compliance with local housing and neighborhood health, safety and environmental codes. Housing preservation, rehabilitation, reutilization programs will not succeed without improved and sustained maintenance. Localities will need to take the lead in remodeling residential maintenance using new strategies, methods ...


Cash Is King: How Market-Based Strategies Have Corrupted Classrooms And Criminal Courts In Post-Katrina New Orleans, Olympia Duhart, Hugh Mundy 2016 Selected Works

Cash Is King: How Market-Based Strategies Have Corrupted Classrooms And Criminal Courts In Post-Katrina New Orleans, Olympia Duhart, Hugh Mundy

Hugh Mundy

On many accounts, it is a tale of two cities. The headlines and marketing machines tout to the world that “The Big Easy is Back.” But beyond the celebrations and parades, the story for poor Katrina survivors is very different. While many residents and businesses are enjoying a resurgence a decade after Katrina stormed through, others in post-Katrina New Orleans have a different experience. More than ten years after Hurricane Katrina, the city still struggles with systemic failures. These problem areas include housing, health care, mental health treatment, employment, education, and the criminal justice system. All of these challenges are ...


Confronting Race And Collateral Consequences In Public Housing, Ann Cammett 2016 Seattle University School of Law

Confronting Race And Collateral Consequences In Public Housing, Ann Cammett

Seattle University Law Review

Access to affordable housing is one of the most critical issues currently facing low-income families. In many urban areas, rising costs, dwindling economic opportunity, and gentrification have foreclosed access to previously available rental stock and contributed to a crisis in housing. For African Americans lingering economic disparities arising from generations of forced racial segregation and the disproportional impact of mass incarceration have magnified these problems. In this Article I explore legal barriers to publicly subsidized housing, a “collateral consequence” of criminal convictions that increasingly serves as a powerful form of housing discrimination. Evictions, denial of admission, and permanent exclusion of ...


Cash Is King: How Market-Based Strategies Have Corrupted Classrooms And Criminal Courts In Post-Katrina New Orleans, Olympia Duhart, Hugh Mundy 2016 Seattle University School of Law

Cash Is King: How Market-Based Strategies Have Corrupted Classrooms And Criminal Courts In Post-Katrina New Orleans, Olympia Duhart, Hugh Mundy

Seattle University Law Review

On many accounts, it is a tale of two cities. The headlines and marketing machines tout to the world that “The Big Easy is Back.” But beyond the celebrations and parades, the story for poor Katrina survivors is very different. While many residents and businesses are enjoying a resurgence a decade after Katrina stormed through, others in post-Katrina New Orleans have a different experience. More than ten years after Hurricane Katrina, the city still struggles with systemic failures. These problem areas include housing, health care, mental health treatment, employment, education, and the criminal justice system. All of these challenges are ...


Nationstar Mortg. V. Rodriguez, 132 Nev. Adv. Op. 55 (July 28, 2016), Patrick Caddick 2016 Nevada Law Journal

Nationstar Mortg. V. Rodriguez, 132 Nev. Adv. Op. 55 (July 28, 2016), Patrick Caddick

Nevada Supreme Court Summaries

The subsequent discovery of fraud does not provide good cause for overcoming a default of the 30-day window in which to file a petition for judicial review of foreclosure mediation.


Recent Decisions: Discrimination In Housing, 2016 St. John's University School of Law

Recent Decisions: Discrimination In Housing

The Catholic Lawyer

No abstract provided.


Aid To Education; The Ribicoff Memorandum; Church And State; Law And Morals; Fair Housing Laws; Labor Law; Contingent Fees, 2016 St. John's University School of Law

Aid To Education; The Ribicoff Memorandum; Church And State; Law And Morals; Fair Housing Laws; Labor Law; Contingent Fees

The Catholic Lawyer

No abstract provided.


Abating Neighborhood Blight With Collaborative Policy Networks—Where Have We Been? Where Are We Going?, Kermit J. Lind 2016 Selected Works

Abating Neighborhood Blight With Collaborative Policy Networks—Where Have We Been? Where Are We Going?, Kermit J. Lind

Kermit J. Lind

Blight is a term with multiple meanings and a complex legal and policy history in the United States. Currently, blight and its community costs are frequently associated with vacant and often foreclosed homes, defective and abandoned buildings, litter, vacant lots, and graffiti. As a legal and policy term, blight has roots in the common law definitions of public nuisance. Researchers and scholars in other disciplines have cited blighted neighborhoods as both a cause and symptom of larger socioeconomic problems such as poverty, crime, poor public health, educational deficits, and other personal or systemic distress.

This Article traces the seeds of ...


Expanding Access To Justice: Alternatives To Full Representation In New York State, Randal Jeffrey 2016 New York Law School

Expanding Access To Justice: Alternatives To Full Representation In New York State, Randal Jeffrey

Impact Center for Public Interest Law

No abstract provided.


The Fight For Justice In Housing Court: From The Bronx To A Right To Counsel For All New York City Tenants, Susanna Blankley 2016 New York Law School

The Fight For Justice In Housing Court: From The Bronx To A Right To Counsel For All New York City Tenants, Susanna Blankley

Impact Center for Public Interest Law

No abstract provided.


Why A Right: The Right To Counsel And The Ecology Of Housing Justice, Andrew Scherer 2016 New York Law School

Why A Right: The Right To Counsel And The Ecology Of Housing Justice, Andrew Scherer

Impact Center for Public Interest Law

No abstract provided.


Abating Neighborhood Blight With Collaborative Policy Networks—Where Have We Been? Where Are We Going?, Kermit J. Lind 2016 Cleveland State University

Abating Neighborhood Blight With Collaborative Policy Networks—Where Have We Been? Where Are We Going?, Kermit J. Lind

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

Blight is a term with multiple meanings and a complex legal and policy history in the United States. Currently, blight and its community costs are frequently associated with vacant and often foreclosed homes, defective and abandoned buildings, litter, vacant lots, and graffiti. As a legal and policy term, blight has roots in the common law definitions of public nuisance. Researchers and scholars in other disciplines have cited blighted neighborhoods as both a cause and symptom of larger socioeconomic problems such as poverty, crime, poor public health, educational deficits, and other personal or systemic distress.

This Article traces the seeds of ...


No Place To Call Home: Rethinking Residency Restrictions For Sex Offenders, Gina Puls 2016 Boston College Law School

No Place To Call Home: Rethinking Residency Restrictions For Sex Offenders, Gina Puls

Boston College Journal of Law & Social Justice

Modern day sex offender legislation was first implemented in the early 1990s in response to a number of headline-grabbing incidents. Seeking to protect families and children, federal and state legislators passed regulations aimed at tracking, monitoring, and controlling released sex offenders. A key portion of these legislative developments include state and local level residency restrictions, which prevent sex offenders from living within an established distance—usually 1000 to 2500 feet—of various places where children gather, such as schools and daycare facilities. These laws have created enormous hardship for released sex offenders as they attempt to reintegrate into society, and ...


Domestic Violence Victims A Nuisance To Cities, Filomena Gehart 2016 Pepperdine University

Domestic Violence Victims A Nuisance To Cities, Filomena Gehart

Pepperdine Law Review

Unless municipal nuisance ordinances change, domestic violence victims can face eviction just for calling the police. Nuisance ordinances generally impose fines on a property owner or landlord when the police are called to respond to incidents of crime a certain number of times at the same residence. Many nuisance ordinances also revoke a landlord’s rental license if a property is deemed a nuisance. However, many of these nuisance ordinances do not have an exception for incidents of domestic violence and, consequently, victims are scared to call 911 or request police assistance. This comment surveys the development of nuisance laws ...


Do Community Benefits Agreements Benefit Communities?, Edward W. De Barbieri 2016 Brooklyn Law School

Do Community Benefits Agreements Benefit Communities?, Edward W. De Barbieri

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


From The Great Depression To The Great Recession: On The Failure Of Regulation In The Mortgage Market, Dov Solomon 2016 Notre Dame Law School

From The Great Depression To The Great Recession: On The Failure Of Regulation In The Mortgage Market, Dov Solomon

Journal of Legislation

People tend to attribute the outbreak of the 2008 financial crisis to deregulation. This article challenges this view and presents a unique perspective of the crisis as in fact rooted in the way the residential mortgage market is regulated. Focusing on non-recourse mortgage legislation, which is a unique feature of the US mortgage market dating back to the period following the Great Depression, the article analyzes the contribution of this legislation to the onset of the Great Recession. The discussion shows how regulation that was enacted in response to a major economic crisis not only failed to prevent a large-scale ...


Banks, Break-Ins, And Bad Actors In Mortgage Foreclosure, Christopher K. Odinet 2016 Southern University Law Center

Banks, Break-Ins, And Bad Actors In Mortgage Foreclosure, Christopher K. Odinet

University of Cincinnati Law Review

No abstract provided.


Micro-Housing In Seattle: A Case For Community Participation In Novel Land Use Decisions, Patrick Carter 2016 Seattle University School of Law

Micro-Housing In Seattle: A Case For Community Participation In Novel Land Use Decisions, Patrick Carter

Seattle University Law Review

Rather than relying solely on the formal interpretations of government regulators invited by the structure of local zoning ordinances, the City of Seattle should adopt a process that invites community-based mediation and problem-solving when a significant shift in housing density is contemplated in a developer’s proposal. Greater resident participation in development projects allows the City of Seattle to better support those residents in their reliance interests arising from zoning ordinances while simultaneously furthering the policies that underpin urban zoning. This is especially true when such development projects raise the possibility of substantial impacts on the character of a community ...


In Her Words: Recognizing And Preventing Abusive Litigation Against Domestic Violence Survivors, David Ward 2016 Seattle University School of Law

In Her Words: Recognizing And Preventing Abusive Litigation Against Domestic Violence Survivors, David Ward

Seattle Journal for Social Justice

No abstract provided.


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