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Can Sharing Be Taxed?, Diane M. Ring, Shu-Yi Oei 2017 Boston College Law School

Can Sharing Be Taxed?, Diane M. Ring, Shu-Yi Oei

Diane M. Ring

In the past few years, we have seen the rise of a new model of production and consumption of goods and services, often referred to as the “sharing economy.” Fueled by startups such as Uber and Airbnb, sharing enables individuals to obtain rides, accommodations, and other goods and services from peers via personal computer or mobile application in exchange for payment. The rise of sharing has raised questions about how it should be regulated, including whether existing laws and regulations can and should be enforced in this new sector or whether new ones are needed.

In this Article, we explore ...


The Tax Lives Of Uber Drivers: Evidence From Online Forums, Diane M. Ring, Shu-Yi Oei 2017 Boston College Law School

The Tax Lives Of Uber Drivers: Evidence From Online Forums, Diane M. Ring, Shu-Yi Oei

Diane M. Ring

In this Article, we investigate the tax issues and challenges facing Uber and Lyft drivers by studying their online interactions in three internet discussion forums: Reddit.com, Uberpeople.net, and Intuit TurboTax AnswerXchange. Using descriptive statistics and content analysis, we examine (1) the substantive tax concerns facing forum participants, (2) how taxes affect their driving and profitability decisions, and (3) the degree of user sophistication, accuracy of legal advising, and other cultural features of the forums. We find that while forum participants displayed generally accurate understandings of tax filing and income inclusion obligations, their approaches to expenses and deductions were ...


The Future Of The Cadillac Tax, Kathryn L. Moore 2017 University of Kentucky

The Future Of The Cadillac Tax, Kathryn L. Moore

Kathryn L. Moore

The Affordable Care Act includes a 40 percent excise tax on high-cost employer-sponsored health care coverage. Often referred to as the “Cadillac tax,” this excise tax is one of the most controversial elements of the Affordable Care Act.

Currently scheduled to go into effect in 2020, the Cadillac tax poses serious challenges and uncertainty for employers. On the one hand, recent estimates suggest that the Cadillac tax may hit as many as 20 percent of employers with health care plans in 2020. On the other hand, there is a serious question as to whether the tax will be repealed before ...


Western Cab Co. V. Eighth Jud. Dist. Ct., 133 Nev. Adv. Op. 10, (Mar. 16, 2017), Sydney Campau 2017 University of Nevada, Las Vegas -- William S. Boyd School of Law

Western Cab Co. V. Eighth Jud. Dist. Ct., 133 Nev. Adv. Op. 10, (Mar. 16, 2017), Sydney Campau

Nevada Supreme Court Summaries

An employer challenged the validity of Nevada’s Minimum Wage Amendment (MWA). The Court held that (1) the MWA is not preempted by the NLRA, (2) the MWA is not preempted by ERISA, and (3) the MWA is not unconstitutionally vague. The Court declined to address factual issues related to the employer’s wage calculations.


P15. Family Status Discrimination: The Never-Ending Story, Christina Iannozzi 2017 Western Law

P15. Family Status Discrimination: The Never-Ending Story, Christina Iannozzi

Western Research Forum

The idea of work-life balance has received increasing attention from media, government, unions, and academics in recent years. This is due to the significant changes in the nature of the family and of roles within family. An interdisciplinary approach can explain the societal context that has prompted a rise in family status accommodation claims. Most notably, women have entered the paid workforce in unprecedented numbers and demographic shifts have created a growing need for eldercare.

Over the past two decades, divergent approaches to family status discrimination in the employment context have developed in Canada. The central dispute appears to be ...


Dinner For Two: Employer Mandate, Meet Erisa; How Dave & Buster’S Response To The Affordable Care Act’S Employer Mandate May Open The Door For Employees To Seek Erisa Relief, Kendall Victoria Dacey 2017 Pepperdine University

Dinner For Two: Employer Mandate, Meet Erisa; How Dave & Buster’S Response To The Affordable Care Act’S Employer Mandate May Open The Door For Employees To Seek Erisa Relief, Kendall Victoria Dacey

Pepperdine Law Review

When the Affordable Care Act (ACA) became law in late March, 2010, Dave & Buster’s (D&B) had a choice: it could either comply and offer its full-time employees the minimum health insurance coverage required by the new “employer mandate” or it could ignore the new requirements and incur a penalty. Dissatisfied with either option, D&B made the drastic decision to circumvent the ACA entirely, and reduced its full-time staff below the ACA’s employee threshold so as to avoid triggering any penalty or having to pay increased health care costs. However, by dodging the employer mandate, D&B ...


But See Kohlheim: The Third Circuit Muddies The Water On The Compensability Of Employee Meal Periods Under The Fair Labor Standards Act In Babcock V. Butler County, John A. LeBlanc 2017 Boston College Law School

But See Kohlheim: The Third Circuit Muddies The Water On The Compensability Of Employee Meal Periods Under The Fair Labor Standards Act In Babcock V. Butler County, John A. Leblanc

Boston College Law Review

On November 24, 2015, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit, in Babcock v. Butler County, formally adopted the application of the predominant benefit test when determining if the Fair Labor Standards Act requires an hourly employee’s meal period to be compensated. In so doing, the court implicitly concluded that each circuit that previously addressed the issue adopted the predominant benefit test. This Comment argues that the Third Circuit mischaracterized the status of the law on which test the circuit courts apply by overlooking the Eleventh Circuit’s application of the relieved from all duties test.


The New Old Legal Realism, Tracey E. George, Mitu Gulati, Ann C. McGinley 2017 Vanderbilt Law School

The New Old Legal Realism, Tracey E. George, Mitu Gulati, Ann C. Mcginley

Tracey George

Do the decisions of appellate courts matter in the real world? The American judicial system, legal education, and academic scholarship are premised on the view that they do. The authors want to reexamine this question by taking the approach advocated by the original Legal Realists. The current project seeks to add to our knowledge of the relevance of case law by focusing on an area that has received little examination: how pronouncements about employment discrimination law by appellate courts translate into understandings and behavior at the ground level. As our lens, we use evidence of how people talk about the ...


Workplace Pollution: Nuclear Safety, Ethics, And The Exploitation--Avoidance Argument, Kristin Shrader-Frechette 2017 University of New Hampshire

Workplace Pollution: Nuclear Safety, Ethics, And The Exploitation--Avoidance Argument, Kristin Shrader-Frechette

RISK: Health, Safety & Environment

The author reviews evidence of poor worker health and safety practices in United States Department of Energy nuclear facilities in contending that less protective standards for workplace hazards constitute an environmental injustice not rectified by a hazard pay premium.


Corporate America And "The Perks" Of Being A Woman: Increasing Gender Diversity In Corporate Boardrooms, Enkelena Gjuka 2017 St. John's University School of Law

Corporate America And "The Perks" Of Being A Woman: Increasing Gender Diversity In Corporate Boardrooms, Enkelena Gjuka

Journal of Civil Rights and Economic Development

No abstract provided.


Too Much Information!: The Need For Stronger Privacy Protection For The Online Activities Of Employees And Applicants, Ralph Carter 2017 St. John's University School of Law

Too Much Information!: The Need For Stronger Privacy Protection For The Online Activities Of Employees And Applicants, Ralph Carter

Journal of Civil Rights and Economic Development

No abstract provided.


The Power Of A Presumption: California As A Laboratory For Unauthorized Immigrant Workers’ Rights, Kati L. Griffith 2017 Cornell University

The Power Of A Presumption: California As A Laboratory For Unauthorized Immigrant Workers’ Rights, Kati L. Griffith

Kati Griffith

In recent years, California has served as the primary laboratory for policy experimentation related to unauthorized immigrant workers’ rights. No other state, to date, has advanced comparable policy initiatives that preserve state-provided workers’ rights regardless of immigration status. Through close examination of two open Supremacy Clause questions under California’s Agricultural Labor Relations Act, the article illustrates that states can, as a constitutional matter, and should, as a policy matter, serve as laboratories for unauthorized immigrant worker rights. Exploring the outer boundaries of state action in this area is particularly compelling given the significant labor force participation of unauthorized immigrants ...


English-Only Policies: The Need For And Benefits Of The Employment Language Fairness Act, Nick Stratouly, Esq. 2017 St. John's University School of Law

English-Only Policies: The Need For And Benefits Of The Employment Language Fairness Act, Nick Stratouly, Esq.

Journal of Civil Rights and Economic Development

No abstract provided.


Murray Energy Corporation V. Mccarthy, Sarah M. Danno 2017 University of Montana School of Law

Murray Energy Corporation V. Mccarthy, Sarah M. Danno

Public Land and Resources Law Review

Holding that the widespread effects of environmental regulation on the coal industry constituted sufficient importance, the Northern District of West Virginia ordered the Environmental Protection Agency to conduct analysis on employment loss and plant reduction resulting from regulatory effects. In admonishing the EPA’s inaction, the court ruled that the Agency had a non-discretionary duty to evaluate employment and plant reduction. Furthermore, the court held that the EPA’s attempt to put forth general reports in place of required evaluations was an invalid attempt to circumvent its statutory duty.


Performance Indicator Analysis Of Proficiency Criteria In The Drug-Testing-Laboratory Certification Process Of The Dhhs, John M. Gleason, Darold T. Barnum 2017 University of New Hampshire

Performance Indicator Analysis Of Proficiency Criteria In The Drug-Testing-Laboratory Certification Process Of The Dhhs, John M. Gleason, Darold T. Barnum

RISK: Health, Safety & Environment

The authors highlight and propose remedies for problems in the proficiency criteria used in certifying laboratories for drug testing federal employees in the United States.


Exhausted Yet? Stevens V. Pensio Benefit Guaranty Corporation And The Application Of The Exhaustion Doctrine To Statute-Based Erisa Claims, Carson D. Phillips-Spots 2017 University of Maine School of Law

Exhausted Yet? Stevens V. Pensio Benefit Guaranty Corporation And The Application Of The Exhaustion Doctrine To Statute-Based Erisa Claims, Carson D. Phillips-Spots

Maine Law Review

By 1974, the U.S. Congress recognized that employer-provided retirement pension plans had “become an important factor affecting the stabilization of employment and the successful development of industrial relations” and enacted the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA) with the aim of protecting “the interests of participants in employee benefit plans and their beneficiaries.” In enacting ERISA, Congress established “standards of conduct, responsibility, and obligation[s] for fiduciaries of employee benefit plans” and provided for “appropriate remedies, sanctions and ready access to the Federal courts.” Apart from creating federal causes of action to ensure efficient and equitable administration of private ...


Trott V. H.D. Goodall Hospital: When Analyzing Employment Discrimination Cases Under Maine Law, Should Maine Courts Continue To Apply The Mcdonnell Douglas Analysis At The Summary Judgment Stage?, Ari B. Solotoff 2017 University of Maine School of Law

Trott V. H.D. Goodall Hospital: When Analyzing Employment Discrimination Cases Under Maine Law, Should Maine Courts Continue To Apply The Mcdonnell Douglas Analysis At The Summary Judgment Stage?, Ari B. Solotoff

Maine Law Review

Since 2003, the Maine Supreme Judicial Court has applied the Supreme Court’s McDonnell Douglas burden-shifting analysis on summary judgment in employment discrimination claims brought under Maine law. Recently, however, some justices of the Law Court have questioned McDonnell Douglas’s continuing application to summary judgment determinations. They argue that the framework is outdated, overly mechanical, and unnecessary. In Trott v. H.D. Goodall Hospital, the court set forth three guiding principles for lawyers and judges to follow in employment discrimination cases facing disposition at summary judgment. In doing so, the court signaled that McDonnell Douglas should continue to be ...


The Power Of A Presumption: California As A Laboratory For Unauthorized Immigrant Workers’ Rights, Kati L. Griffith 2017 Cornell University

The Power Of A Presumption: California As A Laboratory For Unauthorized Immigrant Workers’ Rights, Kati L. Griffith

Articles and Chapters

In recent years, California has served as the primary laboratory for policy experimentation related to unauthorized immigrant workers’ rights. No other state, to date, has advanced comparable policy initiatives that preserve state-provided workers’ rights regardless of immigration status. Through close examination of two open Supremacy Clause questions under California’s Agricultural Labor Relations Act, the article illustrates that states can, as a constitutional matter, and should, as a policy matter, serve as laboratories for unauthorized immigrant worker rights. Exploring the outer boundaries of state action in this area is particularly compelling given the significant labor force participation of unauthorized immigrants ...


Partnerships In Employment Brief: Guidance On How To Obtain Data On The Use Of Subminimum Wages Within A State To Inform Systems Change Activities, Evelyn Doxey, Leslie Jaehning, Elise McMillan, Kristin Vandagriff, Jean Winsor 2017 Disability Rights Tennessee

Partnerships In Employment Brief: Guidance On How To Obtain Data On The Use Of Subminimum Wages Within A State To Inform Systems Change Activities, Evelyn Doxey, Leslie Jaehning, Elise Mcmillan, Kristin Vandagriff, Jean Winsor

All Institute for Community Inclusion Publications

In October 2011, the Administration on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities awarded grants to lead agencies in six states: California, Iowa, Mississippi, Missouri, New York, and Wisconsin. Two additional states, Alaska and Tennessee, received grants in October 2012. These states proposed activities to spur improved employment and postsecondary outcomes for youth with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD). Until the end of September 2016 the Institute for Community Inclusion and the National Association of State Directors of Developmental Disabilities Services provided training and technical assistance (TA) to the eight state projects through the Partnerships in Employment (PIE) Training and TA Center.

PIE ...


The Matriculation Of The Micro-Unit On The College Campus, Barnett L. Horowitz 2017 National Labor Relations Board

The Matriculation Of The Micro-Unit On The College Campus, Barnett L. Horowitz

Journal of Collective Bargaining in the Academy

To the extent the world of higher education was following the National Labor Relations Board there was probably limited focus on the Board’s Specialty Healthcare case allowing for the so-called “micro-unit”. Board decisions as to the employee status of tenure track faculty or football players or graduate teaching or research assistants were likely to be of greater interest. Yet the recent holding in Columbia University that students providing instructional services were also employees subject to the Act’s coverage put the micro-unit in play on the college campus. Almost immediately after this decision petitions were filed at Yale seeking ...


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