Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Medical Jurisprudence Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

2266 Full-Text Articles 1611 Authors 751074 Downloads 92 Institutions

All Articles in Medical Jurisprudence

Faceted Search

2266 full-text articles. Page 5 of 55.

Pregnancy Denied, Pregnancy Rejected In Stephanie Daley, Susan Ayres, Prema Manjunath 2016 Texas A&M University School of Law

Pregnancy Denied, Pregnancy Rejected In Stephanie Daley, Susan Ayres, Prema Manjunath

Susan Ayres

This article offers a reading of Hilary Brougher’s film Stephanie Daley (2006), in which a teen is accused of murdering her newborn (neonaticide). Brougher depicts a “phenomenology of unwanted pregnancy” and an example of therapeutic jurisprudence. Part One examines Brougher’s treatment of the “shadow side of pregnancy,” and highlights barriers to the empathetic treatment of neonaticide. Part Two emphasizes the process of therapeutic jurisprudence as experienced by the two main characters. Brougher’s film provides a social narrative and phenomenology that may influence laws and legal responses and enlarge social understanding of unwanted pregnancy.


The Negative Effects Of Cumulative Abortion Regulations: Why The 5th Circuit Was Wrong In Upholding Regulations On Medication Abortions (Planned Parenthood Of Greater Texas Surgical Health Services V. Abbott), Benjamin A. Hooper 2016 University of Cincinnati Law Review

The Negative Effects Of Cumulative Abortion Regulations: Why The 5th Circuit Was Wrong In Upholding Regulations On Medication Abortions (Planned Parenthood Of Greater Texas Surgical Health Services V. Abbott), Benjamin A. Hooper

University of Cincinnati Law Review

No abstract provided.


Rights Gone Wrong: A Case Against Wrongful Life, W. Ryan Schuster 2016 College of William & Mary Law School

Rights Gone Wrong: A Case Against Wrongful Life, W. Ryan Schuster

William & Mary Law Review

No abstract provided.


Children’S Anatomy V. Children’S Autonomy: A Precarious Balancing Act With Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis And The Creation Of “Savior Siblings”, Marley McClean 2016 Pepperdine University

Children’S Anatomy V. Children’S Autonomy: A Precarious Balancing Act With Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis And The Creation Of “Savior Siblings”, Marley Mcclean

Pepperdine Law Review

On February 3, 2015, Members of the United Kingdom’s Parliament, in an historical move, voted to approve the creation of human beings from three different parents, i.e., the creation of three-person DNA. In doing so, it became the first country ever to approve laws regulating such a procedure. The procedure uses a customized version of in vitro fertilization (IVF) to mix the DNA of two parents with the healthy mitochondria of a donor woman. While three-person DNA is not yet practiced in the United States, there is a controversial ART procedure practiced and unregulated in the United States ...


The Execution Of An Arbitration Provision As A Condition Precedent To Medical Treatment: Legally Enforceable? Medically Ethical?, Marc D. Ginsberg 2016 Selected Works

The Execution Of An Arbitration Provision As A Condition Precedent To Medical Treatment: Legally Enforceable? Medically Ethical?, Marc D. Ginsberg

Marc D. Ginsberg

No abstract provided.


Law And The Sciences Of The Brain/Mind, Stephen J. Morse 2016 University of Pennsylvania Law School

Law And The Sciences Of The Brain/Mind, Stephen J. Morse

Faculty Scholarship

This chapter is a submission to the Oxford Handbook of Law and the Regulation of Technology edited by Roger Brownsword. It considers whether the new sciences of the brain/mind, especially neuroscience and behavioral genetics, are likely to transform the law’s traditional concepts of the person, agency and responsibility. The chapter begins with a brief speculation about why so many people think these sciences will transform the law. After reviewing the law’s concepts, misguided challenges to them, and the achievements of the new sciences, the chapter confronts the claim that these sciences prove that we are really not ...


The Treatment For Malpractice – Physician, Enhance Thyself: The Impact Of Neuroenhancements For Medical Malpractice, Harvey L. Fiser 2016 Else School of Management, Milsaps College

The Treatment For Malpractice – Physician, Enhance Thyself: The Impact Of Neuroenhancements For Medical Malpractice, Harvey L. Fiser

Pace Law Review

This article will introduce some of the issues and offer some possible guidelines which may eventually guide cases of medical malpractice and medical care in the face of neurointerventions. First, I will briefly address the standard of care in medical malpractice cases in general. Second, I will discuss some of the existing and potential physical and neurological enhancements available for physicians. Finally, I will explore how these neurointerventions could alter the standards for medical malpractice for both the enhanced doctors and the entire medical profession.


The Contours Of The Parallel Claim Exception: The Supreme Court's Opportunity To Define The Ill-Defined, Jarret Sena 2016 Fordham University School of Law

The Contours Of The Parallel Claim Exception: The Supreme Court's Opportunity To Define The Ill-Defined, Jarret Sena

Fordham Urban Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Correctional Discharge Planning & The Missing Linkages, D'Andre D. Lampkin 2016 National University

Correctional Discharge Planning & The Missing Linkages, D'Andre D. Lampkin

D'Andre Lampkin

This research project explores correctional rehabilitation and disconnects between correctional facilities and linkage to follow up mental health treatment. One of the components to releasing inmates is providing them with services that help reintroduce them into society. For the mentally ill, linkage to mental health services after spending any amount of time in a correctional facility is heavily dependent on follow through by the former inmate and the expediency and capacity of the mental health departments’ outpatient facilities within the community the former inmate is released into.


Federalism And State Marijuana Legislation, Dean M. Nickles 2016 University of Notre Dame Law School

Federalism And State Marijuana Legislation, Dean M. Nickles

Notre Dame Law Review

An increasing number of states have passed legislation legalizing medical and recreational marijuana. This Note provides a survey of the language utilized by these states in their legislation and legislative materials, searching for and highlighting those purposes and intentions of the states, which implicate, explicitly or implicitly, federalism. Through this survey of mostly primary source materials, various trends and similarities among the materials will be apparent, and this Note will provide a useful resource for those trying to understand why the states may have enacted these laws.


Overtreatment And Informed Consent: A Fraud-Based Solution To Unwanted And Unnecessary Care, Isaac D. Buck 2016 University of Tennessee College of Law

Overtreatment And Informed Consent: A Fraud-Based Solution To Unwanted And Unnecessary Care, Isaac D. Buck

Florida State University Law Review

According to multiple accounts, the administration of American health care results in as much as $800 billion in wasted spending due largely to the provision of overly expensive, inefficient, and unnecessary services. Beyond inflicting fiscal pain on the nation’s pocketbook, this waste has no clinical benefit—and often results in unnecessary hospital stays, cascading follow-up procedures, and time-wasting inconvenience for American patients. But aside from the mere annoyance of unnecessary care, the administration of overtreatment—that is, unnecessary care in and of itself—causes harm to the patient. Excessive care is deficient care. Unnecessary care risks potential medical error ...


Regulating Identity: Medical Regulation As Social Control, Matt Lamkin 2016 Brigham Young University Law School

Regulating Identity: Medical Regulation As Social Control, Matt Lamkin

BYU Law Review

New biomedical technologies offer growing opportunities not only to prevent and treat illnesses, but also to change how healthy people think, feel, behave, and appear to others. Controversies over these nontherapeutic practices are a pervasive feature of contemporary American culture, from students on “study drugs” and cops on steroids to skin-lightening by black celebrities and the over-prescription of antidepressants. Yet the diversity of these controversies often masks their common root—namely, disputes about the propriety of using medical technologies as tools for shaping one’s identity.

Some observers believe these so-called “enhancement” practices threaten important values, offering unfair advantages to ...


Placebo Patents: Creating Stronger Intellectual Property Protection For Pharmaceuticals Approved By The U.S. Food & Drug Administration, Sarah Renee Craig 2016 University of Georgia School of Law

Placebo Patents: Creating Stronger Intellectual Property Protection For Pharmaceuticals Approved By The U.S. Food & Drug Administration, Sarah Renee Craig

Journal of Intellectual Property Law

No abstract provided.


A Fair Trial: When The Constitution Requires Attorneys To Investigate Their Clients' Brains, Ellen G. Koenig 2016 Fordham University School of Law

A Fair Trial: When The Constitution Requires Attorneys To Investigate Their Clients' Brains, Ellen G. Koenig

Fordham Urban Law Journal

The U.S. Constitution guarantees every criminal defendant the right to a fair trial. This fundamental right includes the right to a defense counsel who provides effective assistance. To be effective, attorneys must sometimes develop specific types of evidence in crafting the best defense. In recent years, the U.S. Supreme Court has found that defense attorneys did not provide effective assistance when they failed to consider neuroscience. But when must defense attorneys develop neuroscience in order to provide effective assistance? This question is difficult because the standard for determining effective assistance is still evolving. There are two leading approaches ...


Avoiding Overtreatment At The End Of Life: Physician-Patient Communication And Truly Informed Consent, Barbara A. Noah, Neal R. Feigenson 2016 Westen New England University School of Law

Avoiding Overtreatment At The End Of Life: Physician-Patient Communication And Truly Informed Consent, Barbara A. Noah, Neal R. Feigenson

Faculty Scholarship

This Article considers how best to ensure that patients have the tools to make informed choices about their care as they near death. Informed decision making can help reduce excessive end-of-life care and unnecessary suffering, and result in care that aligns with patients’ well-considered values and preferences. The many factors that contribute to dying patients receiving too much therapy and life-prolonging care include: the culture of denial of death, physicians’ professional culture and attitudes toward treatment, physicians’ fear of liability, physicians’ avoidance of discussions about prognosis, and the impact of payment incentives that encourage overutilization of medical technologies.

Under the ...


Recent Development: Sieglein V. Schmidt: Pursuant To § 1-206(B) Of The Estates And Trusts Article, Artificial Insemination Encompasses In Vitro Fertilization Using Donated Sperm; A Court May Use The Goldberger Factors To Determine Voluntary Impoverishment; A Trial Court Can Issue A Permanent Injunction For Harassment Based On § 1-203(A) Of The Family Law Article., Virginia J. Yeoman 2016 University of Baltimore Law

Recent Development: Sieglein V. Schmidt: Pursuant To § 1-206(B) Of The Estates And Trusts Article, Artificial Insemination Encompasses In Vitro Fertilization Using Donated Sperm; A Court May Use The Goldberger Factors To Determine Voluntary Impoverishment; A Trial Court Can Issue A Permanent Injunction For Harassment Based On § 1-203(A) Of The Family Law Article., Virginia J. Yeoman

University of Baltimore Law Forum

The Court of Appeals of Maryland held that the term “artificial insemination” includes in vitro fertilization using donated sperm, and that a consenting husband is presumed to be the father of the child born as a result of the procedure. Sieglein v. Schmidt, 447 Md. 647, 652, 136 A.3d 751, 754 (2016). The court also held that the circuit court did not abuse its discretion in finding the husband to be voluntarily impoverished or in issuing a permanent injunction based on harassment. Id.


Texas Advance Directives Act: Nearly A Model Dispute Resolution Mechanism For Intractable Medical Futility Conflicts, Thaddeus Pope 2016 Mitchell Hamline School of Law

Texas Advance Directives Act: Nearly A Model Dispute Resolution Mechanism For Intractable Medical Futility Conflicts, Thaddeus Pope

Faculty Scholarship

Increasingly, clinicians and commentators have been calling for the establishment of special adjudicatory dispute resolution mechanisms to resolve intractable medical futility disputes. As a leading model to follow, policymakers both around the United States and around the world have been looking to the conflict resolution provisions in the 1999 Texas Advance Directives Act (‘TADA’). In this article, I provide a complete and thorough review of the purpose, history, and operation of TADA. I conclude that TADA is a commendable attempt to balance the competing goals of efficiency and fairness in the resolution of these time-sensitive life-and-death conflicts. But TADA is ...


Medical Malpractice Arbitration: Not Business As Usual, David Larson, David Dahl 2016 Mitchell Hamline School of Law

Medical Malpractice Arbitration: Not Business As Usual, David Larson, David Dahl

Faculty Scholarship

There is an interesting exception to businesses’, employers’, and service providers’ seemingly universal embrace of arbitration processes, particularly mandatory pre-dispute arbitration. Although it may be difficult to believe given arbitration’s current popularity, not everyone requires his or her clients to sign mandatory pre-dispute arbitration agreements. In fact, some service providers prefer to avoid arbitration regardless of whether it is arranged pre- or post-dispute. So which merchants or service providers are choosing to forgo arbitration and, more importantly, why do they dislike arbitration? And do politics have anything to with their choices? Physicians are not, shall we say, the world ...


Litigating Intraoperative Neuromonitoring (Iom), Michael Brook, Kary Irle 2016 University of Baltimore School of Law

Litigating Intraoperative Neuromonitoring (Iom), Michael Brook, Kary Irle

University of Baltimore Law Review

Statistics regarding surgical medical malpractice are staggering. The annual cost of the medical malpractice liability system has been estimated to be $55.6 billion-2.4% of the total healthcare system.' The median award for plaintiffs in actions involving spinal cords is $2.9 million, and the median value for settlements is $1.45 million. A neurosurgeon will spend approximately eleven years of his or her career with outstanding malpractice claims.

Intraoperative neuromonitoring (IOM), also known as surgical neurophysiology, is hardly a novel medical technology. In fact, it has been used in the operating room for over half a century. IOM ...


Live And Let Die: The Consequences Of Oklahoma’S Nondiscrimination In Treatment Act, Kendra Norman 2016 University of Oklahoma College of Law

Live And Let Die: The Consequences Of Oklahoma’S Nondiscrimination In Treatment Act, Kendra Norman

Oklahoma Law Review

No abstract provided.


Digital Commons powered by bepress