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Informed Consent As Compelled Professional Speech: Fictions, Facts, And Open Questions, Nadia N. Sawicki 2016 Loyola University Chicago School of Law

Informed Consent As Compelled Professional Speech: Fictions, Facts, And Open Questions, Nadia N. Sawicki

Washington University Journal of Law & Policy

This article explores the relationship between a physician’s First Amendment right to free speech and state informed consent mandates. Sawicki details the convoluted jurisprudence surrounding consent mandates, focusing on one-sided and controversial subject matter that many states require physicians to disclose. Sawicki then offers a legal framework for how a physician-challenged consent mandate may pass through the court system based on existing Supreme Court jurisprudence.


From Baby M To Baby M(Anji): Regulating International Surrogacy Agreements, Yehezkel Margalit 2016 Brooklyn Law School

From Baby M To Baby M(Anji): Regulating International Surrogacy Agreements, Yehezkel Margalit

Journal of Law and Policy

In 1985, when Kim Cotton became Britain’s first commercial surrogate mother, Europe was exposed to the issue of surrogacy for the first time on a large scale. Three years later, in 1988, the famous case of Baby M drew the attention of the American public to surrogacy as well. These two cases implicated fundamental ethical and legal issues regarding domestic surrogacy and triggered a fierce debate about motherhood, child-bearing, and the relationship between procreation, science, and commerce. These two cases exemplified the debate regarding domestic surrogacy—a debate that has now been raging for decades. A new ethical and ...


Paper Trails, Trailing Behind: Improving Informed Consent To Ivf Through Multimedia Applications, Jody L. Madeira, Barbara Andraka-Christou 2016 Indiana University Maurer School of Law

Paper Trails, Trailing Behind: Improving Informed Consent To Ivf Through Multimedia Applications, Jody L. Madeira, Barbara Andraka-Christou

Articles by Maurer Faculty

Though intended to educate patients on the risks, benefits, side effects and alternatives within medical treatment, informed consent documents may have unanticipated consequences for patients. Patients may regard these forms as little more than a ritual to access treatment. Or patients may perceive that these forms exist to protect doctors rather than to contribute to a meaningful, patient-protective educational interaction. To rehabilitate the informed consent project, this essay considers the baggage that informed consent documents have acquired through practical use, explores patients' and providers' lived experience of informed consent, and considers whether a multimedia consent application would be a viable ...


Recent Development: Sieglein V. Schmidt: Pursuant To § 1-206(B) Of The Estates And Trusts Article, Artificial Insemination Encompasses In Vitro Fertilization Using Donated Sperm; A Court May Use The Goldberger Factors To Determine Voluntary Impoverishment; A Trial Court Can Issue A Permanent Injunction For Harassment Based On § 1-203(A) Of The Family Law Article., Virginia J. Yeoman 2016 University of Baltimore Law

Recent Development: Sieglein V. Schmidt: Pursuant To § 1-206(B) Of The Estates And Trusts Article, Artificial Insemination Encompasses In Vitro Fertilization Using Donated Sperm; A Court May Use The Goldberger Factors To Determine Voluntary Impoverishment; A Trial Court Can Issue A Permanent Injunction For Harassment Based On § 1-203(A) Of The Family Law Article., Virginia J. Yeoman

University of Baltimore Law Forum

The Court of Appeals of Maryland held that the term “artificial insemination” includes in vitro fertilization using donated sperm, and that a consenting husband is presumed to be the father of the child born as a result of the procedure. Sieglein v. Schmidt, 447 Md. 647, 652, 136 A.3d 751, 754 (2016). The court also held that the circuit court did not abuse its discretion in finding the husband to be voluntarily impoverished or in issuing a permanent injunction based on harassment. Id.


Litigating Intraoperative Neuromonitoring (Iom), Michael Brook, Kary Irle 2016 University of Baltimore School of Law

Litigating Intraoperative Neuromonitoring (Iom), Michael Brook, Kary Irle

University of Baltimore Law Review

Statistics regarding surgical medical malpractice are staggering. The annual cost of the medical malpractice liability system has been estimated to be $55.6 billion-2.4% of the total healthcare system.' The median award for plaintiffs in actions involving spinal cords is $2.9 million, and the median value for settlements is $1.45 million. A neurosurgeon will spend approximately eleven years of his or her career with outstanding malpractice claims.

Intraoperative neuromonitoring (IOM), also known as surgical neurophysiology, is hardly a novel medical technology. In fact, it has been used in the operating room for over half a century. IOM ...


Medical Malpractice Arbitration: Not Business As Usual, David Larson, David Dahl 2016 Mitchell Hamline School of Law

Medical Malpractice Arbitration: Not Business As Usual, David Larson, David Dahl

Faculty Scholarship

There is an interesting exception to businesses’, employers’, and service providers’ seemingly universal embrace of arbitration processes, particularly mandatory pre-dispute arbitration. Although it may be difficult to believe given arbitration’s current popularity, not everyone requires his or her clients to sign mandatory pre-dispute arbitration agreements. In fact, some service providers prefer to avoid arbitration regardless of whether it is arranged pre- or post-dispute. So which merchants or service providers are choosing to forgo arbitration and, more importantly, why do they dislike arbitration? And do politics have anything to with their choices? Physicians are not, shall we say, the world ...


Texas Advance Directives Act: Nearly A Model Dispute Resolution Mechanism For Intractable Medical Futility Conflicts, Thaddeus Pope 2016 Mitchell Hamline School of Law

Texas Advance Directives Act: Nearly A Model Dispute Resolution Mechanism For Intractable Medical Futility Conflicts, Thaddeus Pope

Faculty Scholarship

Increasingly, clinicians and commentators have been calling for the establishment of special adjudicatory dispute resolution mechanisms to resolve intractable medical futility disputes. As a leading model to follow, policymakers both around the United States and around the world have been looking to the conflict resolution provisions in the 1999 Texas Advance Directives Act (‘TADA’). In this article, I provide a complete and thorough review of the purpose, history, and operation of TADA. I conclude that TADA is a commendable attempt to balance the competing goals of efficiency and fairness in the resolution of these time-sensitive life-and-death conflicts. But TADA is ...


Infinity Goes On Trial: Sanism, Pretextuality, And The Representation Of Defendants With Mental Disabilities, Michael L. Perlin 2016 New York Law School

Infinity Goes On Trial: Sanism, Pretextuality, And The Representation Of Defendants With Mental Disabilities, Michael L. Perlin

Articles & Chapters

This paper, presented to the mid-winter meeting of the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers (Austin, TX, 2/18/16), explains why it is essential for lawyers representing criminal defendants with mental disabilities to understand the meanings and contexts of sanism - a largely invisible and largely socially acceptable irrational prejudice of the same quality and character of other irrational prejudices that cause (and are reflected in) prevailing social attitudes of racism, sexism, homophobia, and ethnic bigotry - and pretextuality - the means by which courts regularly accept (either implicitly or explicitly) testimonial dishonesty, countenance liberty deprivations in disingenuous ways that bear little ...


In The Wasteland Of Your Mind: Criminology, Scientific Discovieries And The Criminal Process, Michael L. Perlin, Alison Lynch 2016 New York Law School

In The Wasteland Of Your Mind: Criminology, Scientific Discovieries And The Criminal Process, Michael L. Perlin, Alison Lynch

Articles & Chapters

This paper addresses a remarkably-underconsidered topic: the potential impact of scientific discoveries and an increased understanding of the biology of human behavior on sentencing decisions in the criminal justice system, specifically, the way that sentencing has the capacity to rely on scientific evidence (such as brain imaging) as a mitigating factor (or perhaps, in the mind of some, as an aggravating factor) in determining punishment.

Such a new method of evaluating criminality, we argue, can be beneficial not only for the defendant, but also for the attorneys and judge involved in the case. If used properly, it may help to ...


Clinical Criteria For Physician Aid In Dying, David Orentlicher 2016 University of Nevada, Las Vegas -- William S. Boyd School of Law

Clinical Criteria For Physician Aid In Dying, David Orentlicher

Scholarly Works

More than 20 years ago, even before voters in Oregon had enacted the first aid in dying (AID) statute in the United States, Timothy Quill and colleagues proposed clinical criteria AID. Their proposal was carefully considered and temperate, but there were little data on the practice of AID at the time. (With AID, a physician writes a prescription for life-ending medication for a terminally ill, mentally capacitated adult.) With the passage of time, a substantial body of data on AID has developed from the states of Oregon and Washington. For more than 17 years, physicians in Oregon have been authorized ...


The Execution Of An Arbitration Provision As A Condition Precedent To Medical Treatment: Legally Enforceable? Medically Ethical?, Marc D. Ginsberg 2016 Mitchell Hamline School of Law

The Execution Of An Arbitration Provision As A Condition Precedent To Medical Treatment: Legally Enforceable? Medically Ethical?, Marc D. Ginsberg

Mitchell Hamline Law Review

No abstract provided.


Live And Let Die: The Consequences Of Oklahoma’S Nondiscrimination In Treatment Act, Kendra Norman 2016 University of Oklahoma College of Law

Live And Let Die: The Consequences Of Oklahoma’S Nondiscrimination In Treatment Act, Kendra Norman

Oklahoma Law Review

No abstract provided.


Abortion, Informed Consent, And Regulatory Spillover, Katherine A. Shaw, Alex Stein 2016 Cardozo School of Law

Abortion, Informed Consent, And Regulatory Spillover, Katherine A. Shaw, Alex Stein

Indiana Law Journal

The constitutional law of abortion stands on the untenable assumption that any state’s abortion regulations impact citizens of that state alone. On this understand-ing, the state’s boundaries demarcate the terrain on which women’s right to abortion clashes with state power to regulate that right.

This Article uncovers a previously unnoticed horizontal dimension of abortion regulation: the medical-malpractice penalties imposed upon doctors for failing to inform patients about abortion risks; the states’ power to define those risks, along with doctors’ informed-consent obligations and penalties; and, critically, the possi-bility that such standards might cross state lines. Planned Parenthood v ...


If We Don’T Own Our Genes, What Protects Subjects In Genetic Research?, Leslie E. Wolf 2016 Georgia State University College of Law

If We Don’T Own Our Genes, What Protects Subjects In Genetic Research?, Leslie E. Wolf

Faculty Publications By Year

No abstract provided.


Do Black Lives Matter? Race As A Measure Of Injury In Tort Law, 18 Scholar: St. Mary's L. Rev. & Soc. Just. 41 (2016), Alberto Bernabe 2016 John Marshall Law School

Do Black Lives Matter? Race As A Measure Of Injury In Tort Law, 18 Scholar: St. Mary's L. Rev. & Soc. Just. 41 (2016), Alberto Bernabe

Faculty Scholarship

Discussions of race-related issues are a constant in American society. Within the last year alone, there have been several high profile events that have prompted important debates about race. Most of the events attracting nationwide attention involved the conduct of law enforcement agents, including incidents in which unarmed black men died at the hands of police officers, peaceful protests that turned violent following the failure to indict the police officers involved in those cases and the use of excessive force on black teenagers attending social events and while at school. Other events included the racial identity controversy regarding a member ...


A House Divided Against Itself Cannot Stand: The Need To Federalize Surrogacy Contracts As A Result Of A Fragmented State System, 49 J. Marshall L. Rev. 1155 (2016), Brett Thomaston 2016 John Marshall Law School

A House Divided Against Itself Cannot Stand: The Need To Federalize Surrogacy Contracts As A Result Of A Fragmented State System, 49 J. Marshall L. Rev. 1155 (2016), Brett Thomaston

The John Marshall Law Review

This comment will explain the necessity for federal regulation of surrogacy contracts by analyzing the current state of surrogacy laws across the United States. This will be accomplished by examining the fragmented state system and how this largely ignored area of the law has been a feeding ground for widespread forum shopping and inconsistent results. This comment will then address the public policy reasons in support of enforcing these contracts. Next, this comment will examine the avenues of congressional power for regulating these types of contracts. Lastly, this comment will propose that the federal government implement legislation containing key language ...


Medical Decision Making For Youth In The Foster Care System, 49 J. Marshall L. Rev. 1103 (2016), Zach Strassburger 2016 John Marshall Law School

Medical Decision Making For Youth In The Foster Care System, 49 J. Marshall L. Rev. 1103 (2016), Zach Strassburger

The John Marshall Law Review

Youth in the foster care system often have no one person who is clearly authorized to make medical decisions for them. From a caseworker insisting upon a vaccine to a birth parent refusing permission for psychotropic medication, the evidence supports the argument that who makes these decisions matters for children’s rights. The Author reviewed relevant laws and policies, surveyed stakeholders to understand actual practices, then interviewed a subset of these stakeholders to get further details about who decides what care a young person receives. This Article argues that policies should be nuanced but consistent, promoting birth parent involvement and ...


Does Medical Malpractice Law Improve Health Care Quality?, Michael D. Frakes, Anupam B. Jena 2016 Duke Law School

Does Medical Malpractice Law Improve Health Care Quality?, Michael D. Frakes, Anupam B. Jena

Faculty Scholarship

Despite the fundamental role of deterrence in justifying a system of medical malpractice law, surprisingly little evidence has been put forth to date bearing on the relationship between medical liability forces on the one hand and medical errors and health care quality on the other. In this paper, we estimate this relationship using clinically validated measures of health care treatment quality constructed using data from the 1979 to 2005 National Hospital Discharge Surveys and the 1987 to 2008 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System records. Drawing upon traditional, remedy-centric tort reforms — e.g., damage caps — we estimate that the current liability ...


Religiously-Motivated Medical Neglect: A Response To Professors Levin, Jacobs, And Arora, Doriane Lambelet Coleman 2016 Duke Law School

Religiously-Motivated Medical Neglect: A Response To Professors Levin, Jacobs, And Arora, Doriane Lambelet Coleman

Faculty Scholarship

This Response to Professors Levin, Jacobs, and Arora’s article To Accommodate or Not to Accommodate: (When) Should the State Regulate Religion to Protect the Rights of Children and Third Parties? focuses on their claim that the law governing religious exemptions to medical neglect is messy, unprincipled, and in need of reform, including because it violates the Establishment Clause. I disagree with this assessment and provide support for my position. Specifically, I summarize and assess the current state of this law and its foundation in the perennial tussle between parental rights and state authority to make decisions for and about ...


Federal Statutory Responsibility And The Mental Health Crisis Among American Indians, Abilene Slaton 2016 University of Oklahoma College of Law

Federal Statutory Responsibility And The Mental Health Crisis Among American Indians, Abilene Slaton

American Indian Law Review

No abstract provided.


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